Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas

What is Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas known for?


industry construction

for their work. Principal crops include corn, peanuts, sorghum, cotton, bananas, mangos, melons, jocote (''Spondias purpurea''), chard, lettuce and onions. Livestock includes cattle, pigs and domestic fowl as well as beekeeping. Fishing is limited to species such as mojarra and catfish. Just over 20% of the population is dedicated to industry, construction and transportation. The main industry is the Nestlé plant. There are also plants that manufacture plywood and bricks


working population

is about state average. Over 28% of homes have dirt floors and about 64% have cement. About 62% of homes have cinderblock walls, and roofs are either made of tile (about 40%) and or a slab of concrete (about 30%). About 95% of homes have electricity, over 70% have running water and over 77% have sewerage, all above state average. Over 35% of the municipality’s working population is in agriculture. Of these, about a third do not receive any salary for their work. Principal crops include corn, peanuts, sorghum, cotton, bananas, mangos, melons, jocote (''Spondias purpurea''), chard, lettuce and onions. Livestock includes cattle, pigs and domestic fowl as well as beekeeping. Fishing is limited to species such as mojarra and catfish. Just over 20% of the population is dedicated to industry, construction and transportation. The main industry is the Nestlé plant. There are also plants that manufacture plywood and bricks. There is also some handcraft workshops. Over 41% of the population is dedicated to commerce, services and tourism. One of the main tourist attractions for the municipality is the Sumidero Canyon, with the municipal docks on the Grijalva River mostly serving tour boats into the National Park up to the La Angostura Dam. Most commerce is small stores and commercial centers for local needs and some for tourism. Services include hotels, auto repair and professional services. There are three hotels with seventy nine rooms. The Fiesta Grande de Enero thumb A Parachico dancer (File:Parachico.jpg) The '''Fiesta Grande de Enero''' (Great January Feast) takes place from 4 to 23 January every year in Chiapa de Corzo, to honor local patron saints Our Lord of Esquipulas, Anthony the Great and Saint Sebastian. The festival has been included in UNESCO's (UNESCO) Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists (UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage Lists) on November 16, 2010, listed as "Parachicos in the traditional January feast of Chiapa de Corzo". ICH entry. Unesco.org (2009-12-11). Retrieved on 2011-06-03. Since then, the event has experienced a surge in interest, making the Dance of the Parachicos (Parachicos) the highlight. However, this has not assured the survival of the event or of the Parachicos dancers. There are fewer dancers than in the past, and many of the younger generation are not interested in the time it takes to carve a traditional mask from wood then lacquer it. The Sumidero Canyon was once the site of an epic battle between the Spainiards and Chiapanecan Indians. Many Chiapanecans chose to throw themselves from the high edges of the canyon rather than be defeated by Spanish forces. Today, the canyon is a popular destination for ecotourism. Visitors often take boat trips down the river that runs through the canyon and enjoy the area's natural beauty including the many birds and abundant vegetation. The Spanish introduced new crops such as sugar cane, wheat, barley and indigo as main economic staples along native ones such as corn, cotton, cacao (cacao bean) and beans. Livestock such as cattle, horses and sheep were introduced as well. Regions would specialize in certain crops and animals depending on local conditions and for many of these regions, communication and travel were difficult. Most Europeans and their descendents tended to concentrate in cities such as Ciudad Real (San Cristóbal de las Casas), Comitán, Chiapa (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas) and Tuxtla (Tuxtla Gutiérrez). Intermixing of the races was prohibited by colonial law but by the end of the 17th century there was a significant mestizo population. Added to this was a population of African slaves brought in by the Spanish (Afro-Mexican) in the middle of the 16th century due to the loss of native workforce. Jiménez González, p. 30–31. The major center for ceramics in the state is the city of Amatenango del Valle, with its barro blanco (white clay) pottery. Jiménez González, p. 44. The most traditional ceramic in Amatenango and Aguacatenango is a type of large jar called a cantaro used to transport water and other liquids. Many pieces created from this clay are ornamental as well as traditional pieces for everyday use such as comals, dishes, storage containers and flowerpots. All pieces here are made by hand using techniques that go back centuries. Other communities that produce ceramics include Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas), Tonalá (Tonalá, Chiapas), Ocuilpa, Suchiapa and San Cristóbal de las Casas. As a municipality, the city is the local government authority for eighty three other communities which cover a territory of 412.40km2. The three urban communities of the municipality are Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Copoya and El Jobo. However, all of the rural communities have populations of less than 600 and most have less than 200. Important rural communities include Emiliano Zapata (Agua Fría), La Libertad, Tierra Colorada, Lacandón, San Juan and San Vicente El Alto. It borders the municipalities of San Fernando (San Fernando, Chiapas), Osumacinta, Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas), Suchiapa, Ocozocoautla and Berriozábal. - 024 Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas) Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas) -


beauty+including

the area's natural beauty including the many birds and abundant vegetation. The Spanish introduced new crops such as sugar cane, wheat, barley and indigo as main economic staples along native ones such as corn, cotton, cacao (cacao bean) and beans. Livestock such as cattle, horses and sheep were introduced as well. Regions would specialize in certain crops and animals depending on local conditions and for many of these regions, communication


monumental buildings)

; The development of the ancient city has been divided into a number of phases. The earliest and most important are the Escalera or Chiapa III (700-500BCE) and Francesa or Chiapa IV (500BCE to 100CE) phase. Olmec influence is strongest in the Escalera phase when it became a planned town with formal plazas and monumental buildings. However, contacts with Mayan areas is evident as well. However, even during this phase, there are significant differences in architecture and pottery which suggest a distinct


quot multiple

693668 newspaper Milenio location Mexico City date April 13, 2010 accessdate May 24, 2011 language Spanish trans_title The oldest pre Hispanic tomb in Chiapas

language Spanish trans_title Chiapa de Corzo:Found multiple thousand year old burial The burial shows that many elements of Mesoamerican burials are older than previously thought. The archeological site lies just outside the urban sprawl of modern Chiapa de Corzo, but the city is growing over it and many areas known to contains ruins underground are encroached upon by modern homes and businesses. The discovery of the ancient tomb has


site show

the Archaic period (Mesoamerican chronology) of Mesoamerican history. Lowe, p. 122-123. The immediate area of the municipality was settled around 1200 BCE by a group of people related to the Olmec culture, who are thought to have been speakers of an early Mixe–Zoquean language (Mixe–Zoquean languages). However, the exact relationship between Chiapa de Corzo and the Olmec world has not been definitively established. By 900 or 800 BCE, the village, now archeological site

, show a strong relationship with the Olmec center of La Venta, but it is unknown is Chiapa was ruled by La Venta or not. However, much the settlement shared many features with La Venta, including a ceremonial pond and pottery styles as well as using the same sources for materials such as obsidian and andesite.


traditional food

and the streets quiet. The Parachicos cry during their mass as the festival ends. The traditional food during this time is pork with rice and pepita con tasajo. The Sumidero Canyon was once the site of an epic battle between the Spainiards and Chiapanecan Indians. Many Chiapanecans chose to throw themselves from the high edges of the canyon rather than be defeated by Spanish forces. Today, the canyon is a popular destination for ecotourism. Visitors often take boat trips down the river that runs through the canyon and enjoy the area's natural beauty including the many birds and abundant vegetation. The Spanish introduced new crops such as sugar cane, wheat, barley and indigo as main economic staples along native ones such as corn, cotton, cacao (cacao bean) and beans. Livestock such as cattle, horses and sheep were introduced as well. Regions would specialize in certain crops and animals depending on local conditions and for many of these regions, communication and travel were difficult. Most Europeans and their descendents tended to concentrate in cities such as Ciudad Real (San Cristóbal de las Casas), Comitán, Chiapa (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas) and Tuxtla (Tuxtla Gutiérrez). Intermixing of the races was prohibited by colonial law but by the end of the 17th century there was a significant mestizo population. Added to this was a population of African slaves brought in by the Spanish (Afro-Mexican) in the middle of the 16th century due to the loss of native workforce. Jiménez González, p. 30–31. The major center for ceramics in the state is the city of Amatenango del Valle, with its barro blanco (white clay) pottery. Jiménez González, p. 44. The most traditional ceramic in Amatenango and Aguacatenango is a type of large jar called a cantaro used to transport water and other liquids. Many pieces created from this clay are ornamental as well as traditional pieces for everyday use such as comals, dishes, storage containers and flowerpots. All pieces here are made by hand using techniques that go back centuries. Other communities that produce ceramics include Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas), Tonalá (Tonalá, Chiapas), Ocuilpa, Suchiapa and San Cristóbal de las Casas. As a municipality, the city is the local government authority for eighty three other communities which cover a territory of 412.40km2. The three urban communities of the municipality are Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Copoya and El Jobo. However, all of the rural communities have populations of less than 600 and most have less than 200. Important rural communities include Emiliano Zapata (Agua Fría), La Libertad, Tierra Colorada, Lacandón, San Juan and San Vicente El Alto. It borders the municipalities of San Fernando (San Fernando, Chiapas), Osumacinta, Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas), Suchiapa, Ocozocoautla and Berriozábal. - 024 Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas) Chiapa de Corzo (Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas) -


people carrying

. They are followed by people carrying flags representing various saints. In the middle of these is the flag of the city’s patron saint and “king” of the festival, Saint Sebastian. Environment thumb Grijalva river running through the city. (File:GrijalvaRiverCorzo.jpg) The municipality consists of rolling hills which alternate with flat areas, mostly along rivers and streams. Most of the territory is in the Central Valley region but in the northwest


past year

to give thanks for what has been received over the past year. On 8 January, the Fiesta Grande is announced and the first of the dances, by dancers called “Chuntas,” is performed. The feast day of the Our Lord of Esquipulas is on January 15, who is honored where he is kept at the Señor de Milagros Church. On 16 January the festival of Saint Sebastian is announced. 17 January is dedicated to San Antonio Abad with a parade of Parachicos. On 18 January


intricate

;ref name "encmuc" The most important craft in the municipality is the working of wood, often with these pieces glazed in lacquer. One item is the masks used for traditional dances such as Parachicos. Another is the popular musical instrument the marimba. Lacquer is used on wooden items and other things such as gourds. It is decorative, often with intricate designs. This craft is locally called “laca.” Other important churches

Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas

'''Chiapa de Corzo''' is a small city and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) situated in the west-central part of the Mexican (Mexico) state of Chiapas. Located in the Grijalva River valley of the Chiapas highlands, Chiapa de Corzo lies some 15 km (9.3 mi) to the east of the state capital, Tuxtla Gutiérrez. Chiapa has been occupied since at least 1400 BCE, with a major archeological site which reached it height between 700 BCE and 200 CE. It is important because the earliest inscribed date, the earliest form of hieroglyphic writing and the earliest Mesoamerican tomb burial have all been found here. Chiapa is also the site of the first Spanish city founded in Chiapas in 1528. However, because of the climate, most Spanish would move into the mountains to found what is now known as San Cristóbal de las Casas. Chiapa would be left to the indigenous and to the Dominican (Dominican Order) friars and called Chiapa de los Indios (with San Cristobal known as Chiapa de los Españoles). The current name was created to honor Liberal (Reform War) politician Angel Albino Corzo.

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