Chamba, Himachal Pradesh

What is Chamba, Himachal Pradesh known for?


920

subdivision_name1 Himachal Pradesh subdivision_type2 District (Districts of India) subdivision_name2 Chamba district government_footnotes government_type leader_title leader_name established_title Founded established_date 920 area_magnitude unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_total_km2 area_land_km2 population_as_of 2005

the town of Chamba. Sharma & Sethi (1997), p.34 In 920, Raja Sahil Varman (or Raja Sahil Verma) shifted the capital of the kingdom to Chamba, following the specific request of his daughter Champavati (Chamba was named after her). From the time of Raju Maru, 67 Rajas of this dynasty have ruled over Chamba until it finally merged with the Indian Union in April 1948, although Chamba was under United Kingdom British

, which is situated to the east of the present day Chamba town. For three hundred years, kings of Rajput Dynasty ruled from their capital in Bharmour. However, in 920, Raja Sahil Varman (or Raja Sahila Verma), King of Bharmour, shifted his capital from Bharmour to a more centrally located plateau in the lower Ravi valley, and named the city Champavati, after his daughter. There is some variation in the story


made good

. The British territories in the hill came under British Crown after Queen Victoria's proclamation of 1858. The states of Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India) and Bilaspur (Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh) made good progress in many fields during the British rule. During World War I, virtually all rulers of the hill states remained loyal and contributed to the British war effort both in the form of men and materials. Amongst these were the states of Kangra, Jaswan, Datarpur, Guler, Nurpur (Nurpur, India), Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Suket, Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India) and Bilaspur (Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh). The British territories in the hill came under British Crown after Queen Victoria's proclamation of 1858. The states of Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India) and Bilaspur (Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh) made good progress in many fields during the British rule. During World War I, virtually all rulers of the hill states remained loyal and contributed to the British war effort both in the form of men and materials. Amongst these were the states of Kangra, Jaswan, Datarpur, Guler, Nurpur (Nurpur, India), Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Suket, Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India) and Bilaspur (Bilaspur, Himachal Pradesh). - Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh) Himachal Pradesh M Cl align "right" 20,327 - After staying for a few days at Basoli, the Guru marched back to Anandpur, and the local Rajas decided to make peace with him. However, after two years the hostilities between the Rajas and the Guru reappeared. Raja Ajmer Chand allied with the Rajas of Hindur, Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh) and Fatehpur (Fatehpur, Uttar Pradesh), and attacked Anandpur in 1703-04. They failed to oust the Guru in the Third Battle of Anandpur, and retreated. There are a number of archaeological sacred sites requiring iconographic analysis in the Chaurasi complex in Chamba, Himachal Pradesh. Though it may be hagiographical accretion and folk lore, it is said that in the reign of Sahil Varman: "Soon after Sahil Varman's accession Brahmapura was visited by 84 yogis mahasidhas, who were greatly pleased with the Raja's piety and hospitality; and as he ad no heir, they promised him ten sons and in due course ten sons were born and also a daughter named Champavati." Source: (accessed: Sunday March 7, 2010) * Bundelkhand (Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh) Chamba, Himachal Pradesh Chamba -Kangra (Kangra, Himachal Pradesh) (Himachal Pradesh) * Doab Braj (Uttar Pradesh) Carriacou is an island north of Grenada, best-known for the Big Drum Afro-Caribbean song-style (Afro-American music). Big Drum dates back to at least the late 18th century. Most of the other castes of Gaddis are thought to be descended from people who fled to the hills to escape the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's persecutions in the 17th century CE. right 300px thumb Dhauladhar from Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh Dharamsala (File:Montaro Dhauladhar (foto de Dharamsala).jpg) The '''Dhauladhar''' range (lit. The White Range) Singh (2000), p. 2. is a southern branch of the main Outer Himalayan chain of mountains. It rises spectacularly from the Indian plains to the north of Kangra (Kangra, Himachal Pradesh) and Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India). Dharamsala (Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh), the headquarters of Kangra district, lies on its southern spur (Spur (mountain)) in above the Kangra Valley, which divides it from Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh). Dhaula Dhar ''The Imperial Gazetteer of India'', v. 11, ''p. 287.'' Synopsis Manav (Akshaye Khanna) comes to visit India with his wealthy father Jagmohan Mehta (Amrish Puri), his aunt and uncle, and his father's employees. In Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh) he meets Mansi (Aishwarya Rai), the beautiful daughter of a spiritual singer named Tara Babu (Alok Nath); their families meet, and Jagmohan and Tara Babu become acquainted and friendly toward each other. Manav and Mansi fall in love, but when Jagmohan learns of this he packs the family up and moves them to their house in Mumbai, with the excuse that Mansi and her father are of low social status. However, he is nice to Tara Babu's face and invites him to come and stay with him and Mumbai if he, Tara Babu, ever happens to be travelling there. Mansi is distressed by Manav's departure but he assures her that he will not abandon her and that everything will be fine. She gives Manav his scarf which she modified, making it say "Manavsi", a mixture of their names. Dalhousie is a gateway to the ancient Chamba Hill State, now Chamba District of the state of Himachal Pradesh of India. This hill region is a repository of ancient Hindu culture, art, temples, and handicrafts preserved under the longest-running single dynasty since the mid-6th century. Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh) is the hub of this culture. Bharmour, the ancient capital of this kingdom, is home to the Gaddi and Gujjar tribes and has 84 ancient temples dating from the 7th–10th century AD. 200px thumb Nala (Image:Nala Damayanti.jpg)- Damayanti theme, from the Mahabharat in Pahari style '''Pahari painting''' (literal meaning a painting from the mountainous regions, ''pahar'' means a mountain in Hindi) is an umbrella term used for a form of Indian painting, originating from Himalayan Hill kingdoms of North India, during 17th-19th century. Notably Basohli, Mankot, Nurpur, Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Kangra (Kangra, Himachal Pradesh), Guler (Haripur Guler), Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India), and Garhwal (Garhwal Kingdom), and was done mostly in miniature forms. Hindu Hill Kingdoms ''V&A Museum''. Pahari ''Kamat''. During the Second Anglo-Maratha War of 1803-1805, some of the states in the region gave their allegiance to General Gerard Lake. At the conclusion of the war, the frontier of British India was extended to the Yamuna, and an 1809 agreement with Ranjit Singh, ruler of the Sikh Empire west of the Sutlej, brought the states under formal British protection. The Cis-Sutlej states included Kaithal, Patiala, Jind, Thanesar, Maler Kotla, and Faridkot (Faridkot State). Before 1846 the greater part of this territory was independent, the chiefs being subject to supervision from a political officer stationed at Umballa, and styled the agent of the Governor-General of India for the Cis-Sutlej states. A number of states were confiscated, or acquired by Britain under the Doctrine of Lapse. After the First Anglo-Sikh War the full administration of the territory became vested in this officer. In 1849 the Punjab was annexed to British India, when the Cis-Sutlej states commissionership, comprising the districts of Umballa, Ferozepore (Ferozepore District), Ludhiana (Ludhiana District), Thanesar (Thanesar District) and Simla (Simla District), was incorporated with the new Punjab Province (Punjab (British India)). The name continued to be applied to this division until 1862, when, owing to Ferozepore having been transferred to Lahore Division, and a part of Thanesar to Delhi Division, it ceased to be appropriate. The remaining tract became known as the Umballa Division. The princely states of Patiala, Jind, and Nabha were appointed a separate political agency in 1901. Excluding Bahawalpur, for which there was no political agent, and Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), the other states were grouped under the commissioners of Jullunder and Delhi, and the superintendent of the Simla Hill States. '''Pathankot''' (Punjabi (Punjabi language): ਪਠਾਨਕੋਟ) became 22nd district on 27 July 2011 and a municipal corporation in the Indian state (States and territories of India) of Punjab (Punjab (India)). It was a part of the Nurpur princely state ruled by the Rajputs prior to 1849 AD. It is a meeting point of the three northern states (North India) of Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir. Due to its ideal location, Pathankot serves as a travel hub for the three northerly states. Pathankot is the fifth largest city in the state of Punjab in terms of population. It is the last city in Punjab on the national highway that connects Jammu and Kashmir with the rest of India. Situated in the foothills of Kangra and Dalhousie, with the river Chakki flowing close by, the city is often used as a rest-stop before heading into the mountains of Jammu and Kashmir, Dalhousie, Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), and Kangra (Kangra Valley), deep into the Himalayas.


publishing year

book last Bharati first K.R title Chamba Himalaya: amazing land, unique culture accessdate 2009-10-26 url http: books.google.com books?id VO9cP6LYR8wC&printsec frontcover&dq Chamba&lr #v onepage&q &f false publisher Indus Publishing year 2001 isbn 81-7387-125-6 *

Travel Guide publisher Footprint Travel Guides year 2000 isbn 1-900949-79-2 * *

; culture : new light on the early ... work Gaddi Land in Chamba Stone temples url http: books.google.com books?id 2EaFNQ7Zfl8C&pg PA174&dq Chamba&lr #v onepage&q &f false publisher Indus Publishing year 2005 isbn 81-7387-174-4 *


song style

) Carriacou is an island north of Grenada, best-known for the Big Drum Afro-Caribbean song-style (Afro-American music). Big Drum dates back to at least the late 18th century. Carriacou's Afro-Caribbean (wikt:Afro-Caribbean) population is divided into nations, each of which has a distinct rhythm that identifies it; Big Drum glorifies the ancestors of these nations, which include the Manding (Mandinka people), Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Temne people Temne


love scenes

, particularly the legends of Hindu mythology such as Radha Krishna, Shiva-Parvati, Rama Darbar, Yashoda and Krishna, Gopis, love scenes, deer, birds and women, Daya Saptashati and Krishna - Sudama.


low social

Babu (Alok Nath); their families meet, and Jagmohan and Tara Babu become acquainted and friendly toward each other. Manav and Mansi fall in love, but when Jagmohan learns of this he packs the family up and moves them to their house in Mumbai, with the excuse that Mansi and her father are of low social status. However, he is nice to Tara Babu's face and invites him to come and stay with him and Mumbai if he, Tara Babu, ever happens to be travelling there. Mansi is distressed by Manav's departure


hard life

Most of the other castes of Gaddis are thought to be descended from people who fled to the hills to escape the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb's persecutions in the 17th century CE. right 300px thumb Dhauladhar from Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh Dharamsala (File:Montaro Dhauladhar (foto de Dharamsala).jpg) The '''Dhauladhar''' range (lit. The White Range) Singh (2000), p. 2. is a southern branch of the main Outer Himalayan chain of mountains. It rises spectacularly from the Indian plains to the north of Kangra (Kangra, Himachal Pradesh) and Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India). Dharamsala (Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh), the headquarters of Kangra district, lies on its southern spur (Spur (mountain)) in above the Kangra Valley, which divides it from Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh). Dhaula Dhar ''The Imperial Gazetteer of India'', v. 11, ''p. 287.'' Synopsis Manav (Akshaye Khanna) comes to visit India with his wealthy father Jagmohan Mehta (Amrish Puri), his aunt and uncle, and his father's employees. In Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh) he meets Mansi (Aishwarya Rai), the beautiful daughter of a spiritual singer named Tara Babu (Alok Nath); their families meet, and Jagmohan and Tara Babu become acquainted and friendly toward each other. Manav and Mansi fall in love, but when Jagmohan learns of this he packs the family up and moves them to their house in Mumbai, with the excuse that Mansi and her father are of low social status. However, he is nice to Tara Babu's face and invites him to come and stay with him and Mumbai if he, Tara Babu, ever happens to be travelling there. Mansi is distressed by Manav's departure but he assures her that he will not abandon her and that everything will be fine. She gives Manav his scarf which she modified, making it say "Manavsi", a mixture of their names. Dalhousie is a gateway to the ancient Chamba Hill State, now Chamba District of the state of Himachal Pradesh of India. This hill region is a repository of ancient Hindu culture, art, temples, and handicrafts preserved under the longest-running single dynasty since the mid-6th century. Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh) is the hub of this culture. Bharmour, the ancient capital of this kingdom, is home to the Gaddi and Gujjar tribes and has 84 ancient temples dating from the 7th–10th century AD. 200px thumb Nala (Image:Nala Damayanti.jpg)- Damayanti theme, from the Mahabharat in Pahari style '''Pahari painting''' (literal meaning a painting from the mountainous regions, ''pahar'' means a mountain in Hindi) is an umbrella term used for a form of Indian painting, originating from Himalayan Hill kingdoms of North India, during 17th-19th century. Notably Basohli, Mankot, Nurpur, Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Kangra (Kangra, Himachal Pradesh), Guler (Haripur Guler), Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India), and Garhwal (Garhwal Kingdom), and was done mostly in miniature forms. Hindu Hill Kingdoms ''V&A Museum''. Pahari ''Kamat''. During the Second Anglo-Maratha War of 1803-1805, some of the states in the region gave their allegiance to General Gerard Lake. At the conclusion of the war, the frontier of British India was extended to the Yamuna, and an 1809 agreement with Ranjit Singh, ruler of the Sikh Empire west of the Sutlej, brought the states under formal British protection. The Cis-Sutlej states included Kaithal, Patiala, Jind, Thanesar, Maler Kotla, and Faridkot (Faridkot State). Before 1846 the greater part of this territory was independent, the chiefs being subject to supervision from a political officer stationed at Umballa, and styled the agent of the Governor-General of India for the Cis-Sutlej states. A number of states were confiscated, or acquired by Britain under the Doctrine of Lapse. After the First Anglo-Sikh War the full administration of the territory became vested in this officer. In 1849 the Punjab was annexed to British India, when the Cis-Sutlej states commissionership, comprising the districts of Umballa, Ferozepore (Ferozepore District), Ludhiana (Ludhiana District), Thanesar (Thanesar District) and Simla (Simla District), was incorporated with the new Punjab Province (Punjab (British India)). The name continued to be applied to this division until 1862, when, owing to Ferozepore having been transferred to Lahore Division, and a part of Thanesar to Delhi Division, it ceased to be appropriate. The remaining tract became known as the Umballa Division. The princely states of Patiala, Jind, and Nabha were appointed a separate political agency in 1901. Excluding Bahawalpur, for which there was no political agent, and Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), the other states were grouped under the commissioners of Jullunder and Delhi, and the superintendent of the Simla Hill States. '''Pathankot''' (Punjabi (Punjabi language): ਪਠਾਨਕੋਟ) became 22nd district on 27 July 2011 and a municipal corporation in the Indian state (States and territories of India) of Punjab (Punjab (India)). It was a part of the Nurpur princely state ruled by the Rajputs prior to 1849 AD. It is a meeting point of the three northern states (North India) of Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and Jammu and Kashmir. Due to its ideal location, Pathankot serves as a travel hub for the three northerly states. Pathankot is the fifth largest city in the state of Punjab in terms of population. It is the last city in Punjab on the national highway that connects Jammu and Kashmir with the rest of India. Situated in the foothills of Kangra and Dalhousie, with the river Chakki flowing close by, the city is often used as a rest-stop before heading into the mountains of Jammu and Kashmir, Dalhousie, Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), and Kangra (Kangra Valley), deep into the Himalayas.


early work

; culture : new light on the early ... work Gaddi Land in Chamba Stone temples url http: books.google.com books?id 2EaFNQ7Zfl8C&pg PA174&dq Chamba&lr #v onepage&q &f false publisher Indus Publishing year 2005 isbn 81-7387-174-4 *


tara babu

Babu (Alok Nath); their families meet, and Jagmohan and Tara Babu become acquainted and friendly toward each other. Manav and Mansi fall in love, but when Jagmohan learns of this he packs the family up and moves them to their house in Mumbai, with the excuse that Mansi and her father are of low social status. However, he is nice to Tara Babu's face and invites him to come and stay with him and Mumbai if he, Tara Babu, ever happens to be travelling there. Mansi is distressed by Manav's departure

;ref name imp Dhaula Dhar ''The Imperial Gazetteer of India'', v. 11, ''p. 287.'' Synopsis Manav (Akshaye Khanna) comes to visit India with his wealthy father Jagmohan Mehta (Amrish Puri), his aunt and uncle, and his father's employees. In Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh) he meets Mansi (Aishwarya Rai), the beautiful daughter of a spiritual singer named Tara


painting originating

, Himachal Pradesh Chamba is the hub of this culture. Bharmour, the ancient capital of this kingdom, is home to the Gaddi and Gujjar tribes and has 84 ancient temples dating from the 7th–10th century AD. 200px thumb Nala (Image:Nala Damayanti.jpg)- Damayanti theme, from the Mahabharat in Pahari style '''Pahari painting''' (literal meaning a painting from the mountainous regions, ''pahar'' means a mountain in Hindi) is an umbrella term used for a form of Indian painting

, originating from Himalayan Hill kingdoms of North India, during 17th-19th century. Notably Basohli, Mankot, Nurpur, Chamba (Chamba, Himachal Pradesh), Kangra (Kangra, Himachal Pradesh), Guler (Haripur Guler), Mandi (Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India), and Garhwal (Garhwal Kingdom), and was done mostly in miniature forms. Hindu Hill Kingdoms ''V&A Museum''. ref>

Chamba, Himachal Pradesh

'''Chamba''' (Hindi (Hindi language): चम्बा) is an ancient town in the Chamba district in the state of Himachal Pradesh, in northern India. According to the 2001 Indian census (Demographics of India#Census), Chamba has a population of 20,312 people. above mean sea level, the town is situated on the banks of the Ravi River (a major tributary of the Trans-Himalayan (Himalayas) Indus River), at its confluence with the Sal River.

Though historical records date the history of the Chamba region to the Kolian tribes in the 2nd century BC, the area was formally ruled by the Maru dynasty, starting with the Raju Maru from around 500 AD, ruling from the ancient capital of Bharmour, which is located from the town of Chamba. Sharma & Sethi (1997), p.34 In 920, Raja Sahil Varman (or Raja Sahil Verma) shifted the capital of the kingdom to Chamba, following the specific request of his daughter Champavati (Chamba was named after her). From the time of Raju Maru, 67 Rajas of this dynasty have ruled over Chamba until it finally merged with the Indian Union in April 1948, although Chamba was under British (United Kingdom) suzerainty from 1846 to this time.

The town has numerous temples and palaces, Bhatnagar (2008), pages 39-44 Bradnock (2000), p.211

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017