Carpathian Ruthenia

What is Carpathian Ruthenia known for?


quot wooden

of the region is Maramureş. Romania includes the southern Maramureş region, on the south bank of the Tisa (Tisza) river. The name of the mountains themselves is "Carpații Păduroși" which means "Wooden Carpathians". The main city of the Romanian Maramureş region is Sighetu Marmației. During the period of Czechoslovak (Czechoslovakia) administration in the first half of the 20th century, the region was referred to for a while as ''Rusinsko


influence quot

Малоросійство " (t. 2), Kiev, 1993-1999, ISBN 5-7707-5190-8 (t. 1), ISBN 5-7707-8552-7 (t. 2), ISBN 966-504-237-8 (t. 3). Mykhailo Drahomanov, who used the terms ''Little Russia'' and ''Little Russian'' in his historical works, applied the term ''Little Russianness'' to Russified Ukrainians, whose national character was formed under "alien pressure and influence", and who consequently adopted predominantly the "worse


national views

Ukrainian and not in the "learned" yazychiie; it thus initiated the use of vernacular Ukrainian language for literature in the Ukrainian lands in the Habsburg Empire. Because of their populist and national views, the group members suffered harassment by the conservative Ukrainian clergy and Austrian authorities. Since the group came into being during the period of Romanticism, it retained the predominant interests and features of that movement — an interest in folklore and history

; it thus initiated the use of vernacular Ukrainian language for literature in the Ukrainian lands (Ukraine) in the Habsburg Empire. Because of their populist and national views, the group members suffered harassment by the conservative Ukrainian clergy and Austrian authorities. * Józef Kasparek, ''Przepust karpacki: tajna akcja polskiego wywiadu'' (The Carpathian Bridge: a Covert Polish Intelligence Operation), Warsaw, Sigma NOT, 1992, ISBN 83-85001-96-4. *


intense starting

(''Szabadczapatok'') was more intense (starting in November 1939). From January to March 1939 (until Czechoslovakia was dissolved) heavy clashes occurred between Hungarian forces and guard and the army in Ruthenia. Czechoslovakian units were forced to withdraw in three directions - to Slovakia, Poland and Romania. During March the units also faced local insurgents (''Sičovci'') attempting to establish independent Ruthenian state (Carpatho-Ukraine).


active strength

;ref Richard Overy, ''Russia's War: A History of the Soviet Effort: 1941–1945'', Penguin Books, 1998, ISBN 0-14-027169-4 p. XV The official Russian statistics for military dead do not include an additional estimated 500,000 conscripted reservists missing or killed before being listed on active strength, 1,000,000 civilians treated as POW by Germany; and an estimated 150,000 militia and 250,000 Soviet partisan dead, which are considered civilian war losses in the official


literary collection

and actively promote the Ukrainian national cause at the Greek Catholic Theological Seminary in Lviv. The members of the group maintained that the "Ruthenians" of Galicia (Galicia (eastern Europe)), Bukovyna, and Transcarpathia (Carpathian Ruthenia) were all part of one Ukrainian people who had their own language, culture, and history. The great importance of their literary collection, Rusalka Dnistrovaia (The Dniester Nymph, 1836), was in that it was written in the spoken

by Ivan Kotliarevsky's Eneida (Aeneid). The members of the group maintained that the "Ruthenians" of Galicia (Galicia (eastern Europe)), Bukovyna, and Transcarpathia (Carpathian Ruthenia) were all part of one Ukrainian people who had their own language, culture, and history. The great importance of their literary collection, Rusalka Dnistrova (The Dniester Nymph, 1836), was in that it was written in the spoken Ukrainian and not in the "learned" yazychiye


active support

due to its "lengthy existence within the Russian Empire" and describe it as an "indifferent, and sometimes a negative, stance towards the Ukrainian national-statehood traditions and aspirations, and often, the active support of the Russian culture and imperial policies". Ihor Pidkova (editor), Roman Shust (editor), "Dovidnyk z istorii Ukrainy", 3-Volumes, "Малоросійство" (t. 2), Kiev, 1993-1999, ISBN 5-7707-5190-8 (t. 1), ISBN 5-7707-8552-7 (t. 2), ISBN 966-504-237-8 (t. 3). Mykhailo Drahomanov, who used the terms ''Little Russia'' and ''Little Russian'' in his historical works, applied the term ''Little Russianness'' to Russified Ukrainians, whose national character was formed under "alien pressure and influence", and who consequently adopted predominantly the "worse qualities of other nationalities and lost the better of their own". Ukrainian conservative ideologue and politician Vyacheslav Lypynsky defined the term as "the malaise of statelessness". Ihor Hyrych. "Den". Lypynsky on the imperative of political independence Retrieved May 23, 2007 The same inferiority complex was applied to the Ukrainians of Galicia (Galicia (Central Europe)) with respect to Poland ("gente ruthenus, natione polonus"). Similar term ''Magyarony'' was applied to Magyarized (Magyarization) Rusyns in Carpathian Ruthenia who advocated for the union of that region with Hungary. The '''West Ukrainian People's Republic''' ( **Patriarch Filaret (Mykhailo Denysenko) expanded by Irpen (User:Irpen) 07:13, Jun 9, 2005 (UTC) *New stub: '''Carpatho-Ukraine''', mostly material from Carpathian Ruthenia. ''—Michael (User:Mzajac ) Z. (User talk:Mzajac )  2005-06-7 02:10 Z '' *Wrote a bit of history for '''Ukrainian National Republic''', up to the start of the Directoriya. As a result of First Vienna Award Czechoslovakia was forced to give up territory to Poland and Hungary (southern Slovakia and Carpathian Ruthenia. While conflicts with Polish forces were minor, clash with Hungarian forces and partisans (''Szabadczapatok'') was more intense (starting in November 1939). From January to March 1939 (until Czechoslovakia was dissolved) heavy clashes occurred between Hungarian forces and guard and the army in Ruthenia. Czechoslovakian units were forced to withdraw in three directions - to Slovakia, Poland and Romania. During March the units also faced local insurgents (''Sičovci'') attempting to establish independent Ruthenian state (Carpatho-Ukraine).


distinctive culture

populations. All the groups, including local Slavic (Slavic peoples) population, blended together creating distinctive culture from main Ruthenian (Ruthenians)-speaking areas. Over the time, because of geographical and political isolation from the main Ruthenian-speaking territory, the inhabitants developed distinctive features. In the 19th and 20th centuries, Transcarpathia was an area of continuous struggle between pro-Ukrainian and pro-Russian activists. The former asserted


rostislav

of these forces remained behind and were assimilated by the White Croats. As the Hungarians established the borders of Kingdom of Hungary along the Carpathian Mountains, many of the local inhabitants were assimilated. Local Slavic nobility often intermarried with the Hungarian nobles (Nobility in the Kingdom of Hungary) to the south. Prince Rostislav (Rostislav of Slavonia), a Ruthenian noble unable to continue his family's rule of Kiev, governed a great


cultural great

by Anthony Hope, especially ''The Prisoner of Zenda'' (1894). Recently Vesna Goldsworthy, in ''Inventing Ruritania: the imperialism of the imagination'' (1998) has explored the origins of the ideas that underpin Western perceptions of the "Wild East" of Europe, especially of Ruthenian and other rural Slavs in the upper Balkans, but ideas that are highly applicable to Transcarpathia, all in all "an innocent process: a cultural great power seizes and exploits the resources

Carpathian Ruthenia

right thumb Coat of arms of Carpathian Ruthenia (File:Karptska Ukraina-2 COA.svg) thumb Carpatho-Rusyn sub-groups - Prešov (File:Carpatho-Rusyn sub-groups - Presov area Lemkos (left side) and Przemyśl area Ukrainians in original goral folk-costumes..jpg) area Lemkos (left side) and Przemyśl area Rusyns in stylised traditional folk-costumes. Photo: Village Mokre near Sanok. 2007 thumb right Ukraine (File:Map of Ukraine political simple Oblast Transkarpatien.png)'s Zakarpattia Oblast (in red) thumb A road to Yasinya from a ski centre (File:Jasiňa, cesta k obci.jpg)

'''Carpathian Ruthenia''', also known as '''Transcarpathian Ruthenia''', '''Transcarpathian Ukraine''', '''Transcarpathia''', '''Rusinko''', '''Subcarpathian Rus′''' or '''Subcarpathia''',

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