Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

What is Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission known for?


commercial free

outright from Bluepoint Investment Corporation, pending approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Rogers plans to re-brand the channel as '''Citytv Saskatchewan''', invest into improving the channel's infrastructure, and also launch a high definition (High-definition television) feed for SCN. Despite the planned re-branding, Rogers will still commit to SCN's requirement to air commercial-free educational programming from 6AM to 3PM daily. ref

the brand ''STAR 102.3'' with a hot adult contemporary format, but was rebranded as Bob FM in July 2003. Bob FM primarily plays adult hits from the 1980s and 1990s, but will occasionally play songs from before and after this time period (hence the "whatever" in the station's slogan). CKZZ signed on air at 8 a.m. on May 23, 1991, and ran commercial-free until May 27. The first song played was ''Here We Go (Let's Rock & Roll)'' by C&C Music Factory. Founded by South


difficult years

) A-Channel system. However, the WIC stations there were already purchasing broadcast rights to some of Global's programming. Background At the end of the 1980s and beginning of the 1990s, several Canadian hip hop musicians, including Maestro Fresh Wes (Maestro (rapper)), Devon (Devon (rapper)) and Dream Warriors, had significant chart hits, but there were to be difficult years ahead. Milestone Radio applied to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission


free educational

outright from Bluepoint Investment Corporation, pending approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Rogers plans to re-brand the channel as '''Citytv Saskatchewan''', invest into improving the channel's infrastructure, and also launch a high definition (High-definition television) feed for SCN. Despite the planned re-branding, Rogers will still commit to SCN's requirement to air commercial-free educational programming from 6AM to 3PM daily. ref


hits music

Hits music format. This station is owned by Rawlco Communications and received approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in July 2005 Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-335 and was launched in September 2005 for testing, and officially debuted December 8, 2005 at 2 PM as '''CHMC-FM''' with a smooth jazz format branded as "Magic 99". Magic's first song was Michael Bublé's ''Sway (Sway (song))''. The Haliburton Broadcasting Group was licenced by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in February 2001 to open up a new English language commercial FM radio station in Timmins. Decision CRTC 2001-48 Since May 16, 2005, WBUF has been broadcasting as "92.9 Jack FM" using the increasingly popular Jack FM format, playing an eclectic mix of popular music from the past 40 years. At first, 92.9 was one of the only Jack FM stations which didn't use Howard Cogan as the voice of Jack due to its proximity to Toronto's CJAQ-FM, which identified themselves as ''92.5 Jack FM''. Using Cogan would have most likely caused confusion with listeners due to the fact the two stations are also close by in frequency on the FM dial. WBUF-FM also cannot generally be heard in the Greater Toronto Area because the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) allows CKJN-FM to broadcast which is often overlapping & very unreliable in that vicinity, though this was not the case until CKJN signed on. Azteca 13 Internacional The network also operates an international version of XHDF, '''Azteca 13 Internacional''', reaching 13 countries in Central and South America. On July 15, 2004, the CRTC in Canada (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) denied a request for Azteca 13 Internacional to be broadcasted via digital cable and satellite. However, a second subsequent request was approved on January 20, 2006. The channel is available in Canada on Rogers Digital Cable (Rogers Cable) and Vidéotron. Media - radio career Jeff Fillion (full name Jean-Francois Fillion) began his career in his home town of Chicoutimi (Chicoutimi, Quebec) in the late 1980s working for CFIX-FM. Most of his reputation comes from his stint, from 1997 to 2005, as morning man with radio station CHOI-FM in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. He developed over time a strong following, and at his peak, had more than twice as many listeners as his nearest competitor. However, his very controversial and politically incorrect (political correctness) comments, combined with those of André Arthur, resulted in the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) refusing to renew the station's licence in July 2004. The station and license were bought by RNC Media in June 2007 without interruption to its broadcasting. This twinstick structure was permitted by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission because both companies were on the brink of bankruptcy due to their aggressive competition for limited advertising dollars in small markets. In its decision, however, the CRTC explicitly communicated the expectation that this would exist only as a temporary arrangement, to end as soon as the CBC could afford to directly acquire MCTV's CBC affiliates. That "temporary" deal, however, would last 22 years. In 1998, North Superior Broadcasting received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to reopen CJWA as an FM station, which would replace their existing Wawa rebroadcaster of CFNO (CFNO-FM) in Marathon (Marathon, Ontario). CRTC Decision 1998-147 In 1999, the station added a rebroadcast transmitter at 100.7 FM in Chapleau (Chapleau, Ontario), also through conversion of an existing CFNO retransmitter, as well as a new rebroadcaster at Michipicoten (Michipicoten, Ontario). Decision CRTC 99-260 left thumb 120px Original logo used from launch until May 1, 2011 (File:Onetv.svg) In November 24, 2000, a consortium consisting of Vision TV Digital (parent company, S-VOX), Radio Nord Communications (RNC Media), and Wisdom Media Group, were granted approval for One by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). The channel was tentatively known as ''Wisdom: Canada's Body, Mind & Spirit Channel''. Decision CRTC 2000-450 CRTC 2000-11-24 Prior to the channel's launch, ownership was restructured giving Alliance Atlantis and Renewal Partners Company a minority stake in the channel, while Wisdom Media Group's stake was sold. The channel launched on September 7, 2001 under the name ''One: the Body, Mind & Spirit channel''. The body was created by Canada's Parliament on September 19, 1967, to assumed the responsibilities of two bodies: the Board of Transport Commissioners (1938-1967), which oversaw air and railway regulation, and the Canadian Maritime Commission (1947-1967). The Board of Transport Commissioners also bequeathed the CTC responsibility for telecommunications, which it regulated until ceding that jurisdiction to the Canadian Radio-Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 1976, leading the CRTC to change its name to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. The CTC itself was renamed the National Transportation Agency (NTA) in 1988, then the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) in 1996. History The station signed on in early 2003 on 99.1 FM, Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-224 which was the former home in Winnipeg of CKO for a short period in 1988 and 1989. Originally CJZZ was broadcast from the ''Starbuck Communications Tower'', but Canwest found this caused multipath (Multipath interference) to occur, so they applied to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to broadcast from a new transmitter that Rogers (Rogers Communications) was putting up, CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


school radio

to its existing AM FM combos in each city.) Initially licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 1996, Decision CRTC 96-229 it was the first licensed high school radio (List of high school radio stations in Canada) station in Canada. The station didn't go on air until the 1997–1998 school year because the station is run by high school students and had to wait until the start of the following year. From 1983 to 2011, CKLN Radio Inc. was licenced by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission as a campus (campus radio)-community FM radio station affiliated with Ryerson University, and broadcast at 88.1 MHz on the FM (FM radio) dial with the call sign CKLN-FM. It ceased FM broadcasting on April 15, 2011 after its licence was revoked on January 28, 2011 CRTC revokes licence of Toronto campus radio station and continued as an internet radio outlet until it ceased operations on December 26, 2011. Its domain name is now owned by Chris Scully. "About the domain ckln.fm" October 11, 2011 On September 28, 2011, Dufferin Communications, the owner of CIRR-FM 103.9 (CIRR-FM) (PROUD FM) applied to the CRTC to move to 88.1 MHz, formerly held by CKLN-FM, and to increase its transmitter power. The CRTC issued a Broadcast Notice of Consultation inviting other interested parties to apply for the frequency as well. The deadline for applications was December 19, 2011. Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2011-625 In total, 27 applications were received for the frequency; Calls for Broadcasting Licence Applications 2011. Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. including Dufferin Communications, applications were also filed by MZ Media, Astral Media, Newcap Radio, Larche Communications, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Trust Communications, Intercity Broadcasting (CKFG-FM), CHIN Radio TV International, La Coopérative Radiophonique de Toronto (CHOQ-FM) and numerous ethnic broadcasters, as well as a new student group from Ryerson University who have pledged to launch a new campus station that would be organized and governed very differently from CKLN. "Stations vie for vacant radio licence". ''The Globe and Mail'', December 18, 2012. Specific details of the applications have not yet been released. * Canadian Prime Minister (Prime Minister of Canada) Paul Martin expels Mississauga—Erindale Member of Parliament Carolyn Parrish from the Liberal Party (Liberal Party of Canada) caucus, after the controversial MP tells the Canadian Press she feels no loyalty to the party, or to the prime minister. (CBC) * The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approves an application by the American news channel Fox News for a digital (digital television) licence. Fox's previous exclusion from the Canadian airwaves had been criticized by some Canadians as being motivated by the network's perceived conservative bias. (CBC) * The European Parliament approves the new make-up of the European Commission, headed by José Manuel Barroso. (Xinhua) (Bloomberg) History VideoFACT (as it was originally known) was created in 1984 with the launch of MuchMusic as a condition of its licence applied by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). Two years later with the launch of MusiquePlus, it also became a sponsor, as did MuchMoreMusic when it launched in 1998. This system was partially approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on February 28, 2007, with conditions CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


music classic

to move from the AM band to the FM band, and was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on August 28, 2007. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2007-334 In September, CFFX began testing at 104.3 FM playing classic country (country music) music. Sale to Cogeco On April 30, 2010, it was announced that all Corus Québec stations, with the exception of CKRS, will be sold


television service

Corporation 's (CBC) dual role as regulator and broadcaster. The new board's first act was to take applications for "second" television stations in Halifax (Halifax Regional Municipality), Montreal (in both English and French (French language)), Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver in response to an outcry for an alternative to the CBC's television service (CBC Television). Calgary and Edmonton were served by privately owned CBC affiliates (network affiliate); the other six markets by CBC owned-and-operated stations (O&Os). Canada On November 1, 2004, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) began hearing applications for Canada's first satellite radio operations. Three applications were filed: one by Standard Broadcasting and the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) in partnership with Sirius, one by Canadian Satellite Radio in partnership with XM, and one at the last minute by CHUM Limited and Astral Media. Canada In February 2007, Shaw Communications submitted an application to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), to bring the USA Network to Canada (and to automatically allow all English-language general interest cable networks from the USA into Canada). However, because of programming rights issues in Canada, certain programs would be subjected to blackout, including ''WWE Raw''. CHANNEL CANADA :: USA Network Could Be Coming To Canada In September 2007, the commission refused Shaw Communications' request to carry USA Network into Canada because it had too much programming that overlapped with Mystery TV. Mystery TV is an English language digital cable specialty channel that is owned by Shaw Media and Groupe TVA (TVA (TV network)). Digital Home Canada - CRTC refuses to allow USA Network in Canada CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


series featured

aired on May 26, 2009, on CTV and on May 31, 2009, on the newly renamed A (A (TV system)). The series featured 11 girls from all across the country. '''Valerie Smith''' is a left wing social activist who lobbies against violent pornography, violent rap music, and other allegedly misogynist content in Canadian (Canada) media. She is best known for trying to prevent Eminem from entering Canada for a concert in October 2000 because of his misogynist lyrics, a move supported


brand quot

the CHNU callsign instead. In any case, the call letters had not featured prominently in the station's on-air branding, as the station opted to use the on-air brand "NOWTV". CHNU relied on television advertisements and donations from viewers for financial support. On September 28, 2007, Rogers' CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) application to acquire the Citytv stations, including CHMI (CHMI-TV) in Winnipeg, was approved. As a condition


news main

of worldwide reality television franchises, e.g., ''Canadian Idol'' and ''So You Think You Can Dance Canada'').  The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission mandates quotas for Canadian content in prime time; these quotas indicate at least half of Canadian prime time programs must be Canadian in origin, but the majority of this is served by national and local news. CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

The '''Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission''' ('''CRTC''', ) is a public organisation in Canada with mandate as a regulatory agency for broadcasting and telecommunications. It was created in 1976 when it took over responsibility for regulating telecommunication carriers. Prior to 1976, it was known as the '''Canadian Radio and Television Commission''', which was established in 1968 by the Parliament of Canada to replace the Board of Broadcast Governors. Its headquarters is located in the Central Building (Édifice central) of Les Terrasses de la Chaudière in Gatineau, Quebec. Contact Us." Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. Retrieved on February 4, 2011. "At the Central Office Les Terrasses de la Chaudière Central Building 1 Promenade du Portage Gatineau, Quebec J8X 4B1." Address in French: "À l'administration centrale Les Terrasses de la Chaudière Édifice central 1, promenade du Portage Gatineau (Québec) J8X 4B1."

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