Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

What is Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission known for?


high quot

Blunt 's "You're Beautiful," which replaces "fucking high" with "flying high" in the second verse, to the entire song be completely changed, such as D12's "Purple Hills", which replaces profanity, drug references, and other inappropriate lyrics from the original "Purple Pills". Another example of the first type (one-line replacement) is The Black Eyed Peas song "Let's Get It Started", whose original title was "Let's Get Retarded" but was changed to make it suitable for radio play. Sean Kingston's "Beautiful Girls (Beautiful Girls (Sean Kingston song))", in some radio edits, changed "You got me suicidal" to "in denial". The whole chorus of Cee Lo Green's "Fuck You" substituted the word "Fuck" with "Forget", thus changing the title to "Forget You (Fuck You (Cee Lo Green song))" on the radio edit. Radio edits may have more words edited than the "clean version", because of the stations' or agencies' standards. An "amended" radio edit which only removes the major profanities while keeping the small profanities can be produced for some stations that allow small profanities (e.g. "You're Going Down" by Sick Puppies and "Bad Girlfriend" by Theory of a Deadman) whereas a "dirty" radio edit preserving the offensive language but maintaining the shorter play time may be produced, which may be aimed at club play, post-watershed (watershed (television)) radio, and non-terrestrial radio stations. Kid Rock wrote the term "radio edit" into two of his songs, both of which are the same on radio and album versions. CKLW decided to jump on the FM bandwagon and made an attempt to put the contemporary hit format on its FM station (93.9, now CIDR-FM) as CFXX, "94 Fox FM," in 1984, but it failed when the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) refused to approve the format change from big band music. The CRTC allowed the FM station to broadcast the "Fox" format for only four hours a day - two in morning drive and two in afternoon drive. The CRTC's rationale in this was that rock music belonged on AM and that FM was for classical, jazz and easy listening music. On July 12, 2006, CTVglobemedia announced its offer to acquire CHUM Limited and its assets, including the Citytv stations, and related cable properties. CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


part amp

Media Fund, 2008 publisher


making efforts

and Telecommunications Commission ’s (CRTC) history of inability to foster an atmosphere of competition that would allow third-party internet service providers (ISPs) to gain a foothold in the Canadian market. He did note, with the CRTC's usage based oral hearing on July 19, 2011, that they were making efforts to address this lack of competition and criticized Bell Canada and other major companies for their involvement in limiting smaller ISPs.


news shows

by Doug Varty, formally of CHSR-FM in Fredericton, and Keith Tufts, later to found alternative performance venues the Club Flamingo and the Pub Flamingo. CKDU is one of the few radio stations based in the Maritimes where one can hear local hip-hop (Hip hop music), live electronic music, liberal (Liberalism) and anarchist news shows, and the like. CKDU also hosts a number of shows programmed by ethnic minorities in the Halifax area, frequently broadcasting in their native languages rather than either of the official languages of Canada. Generally programming on CKDU is either a regular program which occurs at the same time(s) every week or one-off shows. As a station regulated by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), CKDU is also bound by Canadian Content (Canadian content) regulations. RAI controversy In 2003, RAI pulled its content from Telelatino and petitioned the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to set up its own channel. This effort was backed by Rogers Communications. The Italian community in Montreal was almost wholly in favour of admitting RAI. The Committee for Italians Living Abroad in Montreal (COM.IT.ES.), an arm of the Italian foreign ministry, led the campaign to have RAI admitted. The Italian community in Toronto, however, was divided. Some in Toronto saw the move as part of a scheme by Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi to gain greater influence over the Italian-language media in Canada. Italian law provides the Italian diaspora votes in Italian elections and permanent seats in the Italian parliament. Unlike the more independent Telelatino, RAI was widely seen as pro-Berlusconi. Those in favour of the RAI in Montreal pointed out that TLN quickly replaced its RAI programming with shows bought from SKY, a private television network. Berlusconi is said to have much more control over his private TV companies than over the state-run RAI. KVOS began as an affiliate of DuMont (DuMont Television Network) upon sign-on in 1953 and remained so until DuMont folded in 1956. From January 1, 1955 until the late 1970s, KVOS was a CBS affiliate. In the late 1970s, KVOS sharply reduced its carriage of CBS programming to resolve two commercial disputes. First, Seattle's CBS affiliate, KIRO-TV, had launched complaints against the station and CBS regarding duplicate transmission of CBS programming in the Seattle media market. Second, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission regulations seeking to increase Canadian content and reduce the number of American network affiliates retransmitted on cable television systems in Canada put pressure on the station. On March 28, 2007, Comcast added WUDT to its Detroit lineup on channel 65, replacing the network's national East Coast feed, which had been carried since the 1980s when Comcast in the Detroit area was known as Barden Cablevision, and when Univision was known as Spanish International Network (SIN). Univision WUDT23 ahora en Comcast Univision - WUDT 23 Detroit Portada However, it was never available on WOW! Detroit, Bright House (Bright House Networks) Livonia or Cogeco Windsor; WOW offered the national feed instead, however, Bright House does not have the station or the network on any of its lineups in Livonia, Farmington, Novi or Redford. Channel Lineup - Bright House Networks Michigan Cogeco Windsor doesn't carry the network or the station due to restrictions set by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Comcast has since moved the station to channel 18 in Detroit to make room for the Michigan feed of the Big Ten Network, which now occupies channel 65. Some countries also specify radio format or genre of television programming, in order to ensure diversity. This is the case with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission in Canada. Also, neither the station nor the network are available on cable or satellite systems in Canada. This is because the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) has not approved the network or any of its affiliates to be made available for Canadian audiences — although some of its shows are seen on Telelatino, which is a part Spanish, part Italian cable channel, launched an all-Spanish network on October 23, 2007, called tlñ en español with programs from the United States, Mexico, Spain as well as Central (Central America) and South American countries. History CFMI dates back to 1947 which never made it on the air until the late 1960s. Over the years, the station added FM transmitters in most of British Columbia. On July 26, 2011, CFMI-FM received Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approval by increasing New Westminister's transmitter to the average effective radiated power (ERP) from 37,000 to 53,000 watts (maximum ERP from 75,000 to 100,000 watts), by decreasing the effective height of antenna above average terrain from 686 to 386.4 meters and by relocating its transmitter. http: www.crtc.gc.ca eng archive 2011 2011-440.htm CKVL-FM, as the station was originally known, was founded by Jack Tietolman and Corey Thomson and probably went on the air at some point between 1947 and 1957. Sources disagree on the date, and at least seven different years (including three post-1957 ones) are known to have been reported as the station's first air date. According to the Canadian Communications Foundation, CKVL-FM opened in 1947 according to a 1992 Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) decision, it was in 1950 ; according to the Phonothèque québécoise, it was in 1951 ; according to Gilles Proulx's 1979 book "L'aventure de la radio au Québec", it was in 1954, and according to his 1986 book "La radio d'hier à aujourd'hui", it was in 1958; according to Broadcast Dialogue, it was in 1962 ; and according to the "éphémérides" service used by CKAC , it was in 1970. The website of CKOI-FM does not acknowledge the pre-1976 history of the station. The confusion is increased by the fact that there is no known report suggesting that the station went silent for any noticeable period of time after getting on the air, despite this phenomenon being relatively common among 1950s FM (FM broadcasting) stations. In any case, the Canadian Communication Foundation, which claims the station's first air date was in 1947, does report that CKVL-FM was confirmed as being on the air in 1957. On August 20, 1992, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of CFOX and CKLG from Moffat Communications Ltd. to Shaw Communications. This was part of Moffat's sale of its radio division. Transfer of CKLG CFOX to Shaw was completed on September 1, 1992. Shaw's broadcasting division became Corus Entertainment in 1999. When Western International Communications, owner of classic rocker CFMI (CFMI-FM), sold its radio stations to Corus in 2000, CFOX shifted from album oriented rock to alternative rock, aiming at Rogers (Rogers Communications)' former alternative rocker 104.9 Xfm (CKVX-FM 104.9), which signed on December 31, 1999. History Licensed by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 1987, '''Le Canal Famille''' launched on September 1, 1988 as a replacement to the youth channel TVJQ (Télévision des Jeunes du Québec, otherwise known simply as Télé des Jeunes). Canal Famille was created by Premier Choix TVEC (Super Écran) which itself was already owned by Astral at the time. Initially, as required by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the channel carried no commercials, Decision: Premier Choix: TVEC Inc. "Canal Famille" — 871204400, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, 1 December 1987 except for promotional messages, interstitial programs (such as help segments known as ''R-Force'' (pronounced like "Air Force")), as well as public service announcements. However, since the renewal of its licence in 2006, the channel is able to air product advertisements. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-382: VRAK.TV – Licence renewal, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, 18 August 2006 VRAK.TV does frequently join forces with various companies (mainly grocery products) to present special promotions related to its programming. Initially, as required by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), the channel carried no commercials, Decision: Premier Choix: TVEC Inc. "Canal Famille" — 871204400, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, 1 December 1987 except for promotional messages, interstitial programs (such as help segments known as ''R-Force'' (pronounced like "Air Force")), as well as public service announcements. However, since the renewal of its licence in 2006, the channel is able to air product advertisements. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-382: VRAK.TV – Licence renewal, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, 18 August 2006 VRAK.TV does frequently join forces with various companies (mainly grocery products) to present special promotions related to its programming. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) calls this service "Subsidiary Communications Multiplex Operation" (SCMO). SCMO for internal uses by the radio station, such as internal monitoring and cue control, are allowed under the normal broadcasting certificate. Non-broadcasting uses are allowed when the type of use is authorized CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


news main

of worldwide reality television franchises, e.g., ''Canadian Idol'' and ''So You Think You Can Dance Canada'').  The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission mandates quotas for Canadian content in prime time; these quotas indicate at least half of Canadian prime time programs must be Canadian in origin, but the majority of this is served by national and local news. CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


service television

CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


technical reasons

90-993 They applied again in 1997, and were passed over in favour of CBLA (CBLA-FM), the city's existing Radio One (CBC Radio One) station, which the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) wanted to move to FM for technical reasons. In July 2008, Rogers filed an application with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to launch a separate 24-hour news station to be affiliated with Citytv Toronto, and to be known as CityNews (Toronto


title public

content that is primarily alphanumeric such as emails and most webpages. It also issued an exemption order committing to a policy of non-interference. In May 2011, in response to the increase presence of Over-the-Top (OTT) programming, the CRTC put a call out to the public to provide input on the impact OTT programming

''', commonly abbreviated as '''TSN''', is a Canadian (Canada) English language Category C (Category C services) specialty channel and is Canada's leading English language sports TV channel (television channel). TSN premiered in 1984, in the first group of Canadian specialty cable channels.

, Canada's telecommunications regulator, permitted Canadian service providers to carry the Atlanta station, and other U.S. superstations, as premium channels packaged with Canadian premium services, such as the services now known as The Movie Network or Movie Central.


song beautiful

was "Let's Get Retarded" but was changed to make it suitable for radio play. Sean Kingston's "Beautiful Girls (Beautiful Girls (Sean Kingston song))", in some radio edits, changed "You got me suicidal" to "in denial". The whole chorus of Cee Lo Green's "Fuck You" substituted the word "Fuck" with "Forget", thus changing the title to "Forget You (Fuck You (Cee Lo Green song))" on the radio edit. Radio edits may


interest sports

to operate a general interest sports service provisionally named ''Mainstream Sports'', http: www.crtc.gc.ca eng archive 2009 2009-803.htm#9 which was granted in June 2010. Since then, a number of media reports had suggested that MLSE

Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

The '''Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission''' ('''CRTC''', ) is a public organisation in Canada with mandate as a regulatory agency for broadcasting and telecommunications. It was created in 1976 when it took over responsibility for regulating telecommunication carriers. Prior to 1976, it was known as the '''Canadian Radio and Television Commission''', which was established in 1968 by the Parliament of Canada to replace the Board of Broadcast Governors. Its headquarters is located in the Central Building (Édifice central) of Les Terrasses de la Chaudière in Gatineau, Quebec. Contact Us." Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. Retrieved on February 4, 2011. "At the Central Office Les Terrasses de la Chaudière Central Building 1 Promenade du Portage Gatineau, Quebec J8X 4B1." Address in French: "À l'administration centrale Les Terrasses de la Chaudière Édifice central 1, promenade du Portage Gatineau (Québec) J8X 4B1."

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017