Buttevant

What is Buttevant known for?


portrayal

was a successful London and New York playwright who enjoyed considerable literary acclaim in the first decades of the 20th century. In 1911, under the pseudonym of Richard Dehan, she published ''The Dop Doctor'', which was made into a film in 1915 by Fred Paul. The film gave considerable offence in South Africa because if its harsh portrayal of English and Dutch characters. It was eventually banned under the Defence of the Realm Act. The story hinges around


invention/

be excused for thinking the Commission were referring to nearby ''Killmallock''. P.W. Joyce in his ''The Origin and History of Irish Names of Places'', published in Dublin in 1871, dismisses as erroneous and an invention of later times, the theory that the Irish name for Buttevant meant the Church of the Curse, and cites the Four Masters (Annals of the Four Masters) noting that a Franciscan Friary was founded at Cill na Mullach in 1251. The name Buttevant is reportedly a corruption


local military

regional road. The Dublin–Cork railway line (rail transport in Ireland) passes by the town, but the station, from which at the outbreak of World War I in 1914, newly raised battalions of the Royal Munster Fusiliers and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (The Royal Dublin Fusiliers) who had completed their training at the local military barracks, set out for the Western Front (Western Front (World War I)). Origins of the name Barry (De Barry Family) family: Boutez-en


harsh portrayal

was a successful London and New York playwright who enjoyed considerable literary acclaim in the first decades of the 20th century. In 1911, under the pseudonym of Richard Dehan, she published ''The Dop Doctor'', which was made into a film in 1915 by Fred Paul. The film gave considerable offence in South Africa because if its harsh portrayal of English and Dutch characters. It was eventually banned under the Defence of the Realm Act. The story hinges around


family history

) in ''The Faerie Queen ''; Anthony Trollope passed through in his novel ''Castle Richmond''; James Joyce played a game of hurling there in his ''Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man''; the revered Canon Sheehan of Doneraile (Patrick Augustine Sheehan) mentions Buttevant in several of his novels, not least in ''Glenanaar'' in the setting of the fatal events of the Fair of Rathclare; and Elizabeth Bowen mentions it in her elegiacal family history ''Bowen's Court''. Clotilde Augusta Inez


invention

be excused for thinking the Commission were referring to nearby ''Killmallock''. P.W. Joyce in his ''The Origin and History of Irish Names of Places'', published in Dublin in 1871, dismisses as erroneous and an invention of later times, the theory that the Irish name for Buttevant meant the Church of the Curse, and cites the Four Masters (Annals of the Four Masters) noting that a Franciscan Friary was founded at Cill na Mullach in 1251. The name Buttevant is reportedly a corruption


frequently

of the settlement followed a pattern frequently repeated in the Norman colonies of North Cork and Limerick. The original nucleus of the town consisted of a keep situated on an elevation on the south side of the town. Opposite the keep, on a pre-Norman site, was built the parish church, dedicated to St. Brigit, sister of St. Colman (Colman of Cloyne) of Cloyne. A mill, another characteristic element of Norman settlements, was located on the river, to the north of the keep. In addition

to Dublin in August. Here, it remained through the winter, moving to Buttevant, County Cork, in August. and then to Cork (Cork (city)) itself in April 1848. As was by now inevitable for Irish postings, most of the regiment was posted by companies to towns some distance from the headquarters, with these detachments changing location frequently. The regiment was finally brought together again in June 1849. Carter, pp. 214–219 * Ballybeg in Clarecastle, County


sense monumental

to the conviction among some that his (in every sense) monumental commemorative endeavours were entirely practical (in terms of securing his personal objectives) rather than sentimental (Joan's connections being of no direct use to him after her death). History The Division began forming as part of the K2 Army Group towards the end of 1914 after Irish recruits in the early days of the war from England and Belfast first filled the ranks of the 10th (Irish) Division before being assigned to the 16th


literary career

Mary Graves, otherwise Clotilde Graves (1863–1932), the daughter of Major W.H. Graves and Antoinette Dean of Harwich, was born at Buttevant castle on 3 June 1863. She was cousin of Alfred Perceval Graves, the father of the poet Robert Graves. Convent educated in Lourdes, she converted to Catholicism and embarked on a literary career. She was a successful London and New York playwright who enjoyed considerable literary acclaim in the first decades of the 20th century. In 1911, under the pseudonym of Richard Dehan, she published ''The Dop Doctor'', which was made into a film in 1915 by Fred Paul. The film gave considerable offence in South Africa because if its harsh portrayal of English and Dutch characters. It was eventually banned race, organised by Thomas Coleman of St Albans, was run from Bury Orchard, Harlington (Harlington, Bedfordshire) in Bedfordshire to the Obelisk in Wrest Park, Bedfordshire. The winner was Captain Macdowall on "The Wonder", owned by Lord Ranelagh, who won in a time of 16 mins 25 seconds. Reports of the event appeared in the May and July editions of the ''Sporting Magazine'' in 1830. * 1752 — the Jockey Club is formed to establish rules for British racing; it is the governing body of the sport until 1993 when it hands over control to the new British Horseracing Board * 1752 — the first recorded steeplechase takes place in County Cork over a distance of 4.5 miles between the towns of Buttevant and Doneraile, the name of this type of race being derived from the practice of racing the horses across country by going from church steeple to church steeple. National Hunt Racing. Retrieved on 14 November 2009. * 1758 — the Society of Sportsmen of the Curragh, a precursor of the Irish Turf Club is formed.


field books

that the troopers "being att Buttevant Fair this day took Will Tirry and his wife and brought them hither and I examined them". The Irish denomination for Buttevant has reached such a degree of confusion as to make it almost unidentifiable. The oral tradition of the area consistently gives ''Cill na Mullach'', or 'Church of the Hillocks', for Buttevant. When the area was still largely Irish speaking, that tradition was recorded by O'Donovan in the field books of the General Survey of Valuation, Griffith's valuation, which was taken in the Barony of Orrery and Kilmore ''ante'' 1850. Peadar Ua Laoghaire confirms the tradition in his ''Mo Scéal Féin''. That notwithstanding, several other names have insistently been assigned to Buttevant by Irish Government officialdom: ''Cill na mBeallach'', Cill na Mollach, and more recently ''Cill na Mallach'' by the Place Names Commission, explaining eruditely that it may signify ''The Church of the Curse'', for which, the general public can be excused for thinking the Commission were referring to nearby ''Killmallock''. P.W. Joyce in his ''The Origin and History of Irish Names of Places'', published in Dublin in 1871, dismisses as erroneous and an invention of later times, the theory that the Irish name for Buttevant meant the Church of the Curse, and cites the Four Masters (Annals of the Four Masters) noting that a Franciscan Friary was founded at Cill na Mullach in 1251. The name Buttevant is reportedly a corruption of the motto of the DeBarry family. On the Barry coat of arms the inscription is "Butez en Avant" - Strike Kick Push Forward—or, more colloquially, "Bash your way forward." http: www.irishgaelictranslator.com translation topic52600.html De Barry History thumbnail 268px right The British Military Establishment, Buttevant 1815-1922 (Image:Buttevant102.jpg) Henry III of England, by grant of 26 September 1234, conceded a market at Buttevant to David Og de Barry to be held on Sundays, and a fair on the vigil and day of St. Luke the Evangelist (17 October and 18 October), and on six subsequent days. This was done to further the economic prosperity of the borough and connected with a widespread network of such markets and fairs which indicate "an extensive network of commercial traffic and an important part of the infrastructure of the growing agrarian and mercantile economy". The most important markets and all fairs were associated with the major boroughs and can be used as a gauge of their economic and social significance as also the 1301 quo warranto proceedings in Cork at which John de Barry "claimed the basic baronial jurisdiction of gallows, infangetheof, ''vetitia namia'' and fines for shedding blood (where 'Englishmen' were involved) in his manors of Buttevant, Castlelyons, Rathbarry and Lislee". The town of Buttevant accumulated a series of such grants over several centuries. Fairs and markets were held at Buttevant for cattle sheep and pigs on 23 January, 30 April, 27 May, 27 August, and 21 November. Cattle and sheep fairs were held on 27 March, 14 October, 17 December. Pig markets were held on 11 July. Fairs falling on Saturdays were held on Mondays. Fridays were devoted to egg markets. Horse fairs were held on the Fourth Monday in October. Cahirmee Horse Fair, the only surviving fair, is held on 12 July. The development of the settlement followed a pattern frequently repeated in the Norman colonies of North Cork and Limerick. The original nucleus of the town consisted of a keep situated on an elevation on the south side of the town. Opposite the keep, on a pre-Norman site, was built the parish church, dedicated to St. Brigit, sister of St. Colman (Colman of Cloyne) of Cloyne. A mill, another characteristic element of Norman settlements, was located on the river, to the north of the keep. In addition, a hospice for lepers was established about a mile to the North East outside of the town wall. This basic structure was repeated in nearby Castletownroche, where it is still clearly to be seen, in Glanworth, Mallow (Mallow, County Cork), and in Kilmallock and Adare. A further feature of Norman settlements in North Cork was their concomitant religious foundations. Early colonial sites, such as Buttevant and Castletownroche, saw the introduction of the more traditional monastic communities which were housed in foundations outside of the town walls. The Augustinian priories of Bridgetown (''ante'' 1216) and Ballybeg (1229) being respectively founded by the Roches and the de Barry contiguous to the settlements of Castletownroche and Buttevant. With the rise of the new mendicant orders, essentially urban in character and mission, the Norman settlements saw the foundation of mendicant houses within the town walls as with the Franciscans in Buttevant (1251), and the Dominicans in Kilmallock (1291) and Glanworth (c. 1300). The burgage of Buttevant developed to the north of the keep and eventually increased in size to about race, organised by Thomas Coleman of St Albans, was run from Bury Orchard, Harlington (Harlington, Bedfordshire) in Bedfordshire to the Obelisk in Wrest Park, Bedfordshire. The winner was Captain Macdowall on "The Wonder", owned by Lord Ranelagh, who won in a time of 16 mins 25 seconds. Reports of the event appeared in the May and July editions of the ''Sporting Magazine'' in 1830. * 1752 — the Jockey Club is formed to establish rules for British racing; it is the governing body of the sport until 1993 when it hands over control to the new British Horseracing Board * 1752 — the first recorded steeplechase takes place in County Cork over a distance of 4.5 miles between the towns of Buttevant and Doneraile, the name of this type of race being derived from the practice of racing the horses across country by going from church steeple to church steeple. National Hunt Racing. Retrieved on 14 November 2009. * 1758 — the Society of Sportsmen of the Curragh, a precursor of the Irish Turf Club is formed.

Buttevant

1831 1536 1841 1524 1851 1530 1861 2372 1871 1756 1881 1409 1891 1580 1901 979 1911 1754 1926 834 1936 881 1946 793 1951 769 1956 1027 1961 981 1966 978 1971 1045 1981 1161 1986 1133 1991 1125 1996 1070 2002 987 2006 914 footnote Census for post 1821 figures. http: www.histpop.org http: www.nisranew.nisra.gov.uk census last Lee first JJ authorlink John Joseph Lee editor-last Goldstrom editor-first J. M. editor2-last Clarkson editor2-first L. A. title Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K. H. Connell year 1981 publisher Clarendon Press location Oxford, England chapter On the accuracy of the Pre-famine (Great Famine (Ireland)) Irish censuses author-link Joel Mokyr last2 O Grada first2 Cormac author2-link Cormac Ó Gráda title New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850 journal The Economic History Review volume 37 issue 4 pages 473–488 date November 1984 url http: www3.interscience.wiley.com journal 120035880 abstract doi 10.1111 j.1468-0289.1984.tb00344.x '''Buttevant''' ( or ''Ecclesia Tumulorum'' in the Latin) is a medieval market town, incorporated by charter of Edward III (Edward III of England), situated in North County Cork, Ireland (Republic of Ireland).

While there may be reason to suggest that the town may occupy the site of an earlier settlement of the Donegans, Carrig Donegan, the origins of the present town are clearly and distinctly Norman, and closely connected with the settlement of the Barrys (De Barry Family) from the 13th century. Buttevant: from ''Cork-Guide'' Here they built their principal stronghold in North Cork.

Buttevant is located on the N20 (N20 road (Ireland)) road (national primary road) between Limerick and Cork (Cork (city)) and the R522 (R522 road) regional road. The Dublin–Cork railway line (rail transport in Ireland) passes by the town, but the station, from which at the outbreak of World War I in 1914, newly raised battalions of the Royal Munster Fusiliers and the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (The Royal Dublin Fusiliers) who had completed their training at the local military barracks, set out for the Western Front (Western Front (World War I)).

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