Bowmanville

What is Bowmanville known for?


peterborough

. The interchange with Highway 35 (Highway 35 (Ontario)) and Highway 115 (Highway 115 (Ontario)) to Lindsay (Lindsay, Ontario) and Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario) (exit 436) lies 500 metres east of Bennett Road. Bowmanville is bisected by the Canadian Pacific Railway, while the Canadian National Railway runs to the south of the town. Bowmanville had its own transit system, Clarington Transit from 2002–05, and is now served by Durham Region Transit, which offers

connections to GO Transit and Via Rail. Education Public education is provided by the Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board. There are eight elementary schools in Bowmanville and two secondary schools, Bowmanville High School and Clarington Central Secondary School. The Peterborough Victoria Northumberland and Clarington Catholic District School Board oversees public Catholic education through three elementary and one secondary school ( St. Stephen's Secondary

extensions to many areas, including the Niagara Region (Regional Municipality of Niagara), Waterloo Region (Regional Municipality of Waterloo), Bolton (Bolton, Ontario), Pickering (Pickering, Ontario), Brantford, Bowmanville, Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario) and Uxbridge (Uxbridge, Ontario). To date, an excursion train serves St. Catharines and Niagara Falls on weekends in the summer, and extensions have been made to Guelph and Kitchener


92

, 82, 84, 85, 92, 93,94 In their final season as a Jr. C team before moving to Jr. A, the Eagles went to the Schmalz Cup Final. The Eagles did not have success at the Jr A level until approximately 2004. They had moderate success from there until 2010. The Jr. A league decided it needed to contract some clubs and unfortunately the Eagles were one of the clubs on the contraction list. In their inaugural season back as a Junior C club, the Eagles won the Central Ontario League Championship

was producing an album for fellow Canadian singer Kelita Haverland and Twain was featured on the backing vocals to the song ''Too Hot to Handle''. She also demo-ed songs with Cyril Rawson but the demos were without success, partly due to Twain's wish to become a rock singer, not a country artist. After five months she returned to Canada and moved in with Bailey in a flat in downtown Kirkland Lake. There she met

rock keyboardist Eric Lambier and drummer Randy Yurko and formed a new band, moving three months later to Bowmanville, near Toronto. In late summer 1986 Mary Bailey arranged for Twain to meet John Kim Bell, a half Mohawk (Mohawk nation), half American conductor who had close contacts with the directors of the Canadian Country Music Association. Bell recognized Twain's ability as well as her looks and the two began secretly dating. In the fall


event driving

received little acclaim, but it convinced Bell, who hated pop music, that Twain should stay well away from it and concentrate on country music. He was killed in the summer when he crashed heavily at turn 2 at Mosport Park (Mosport) of Bowmanville near Toronto, Ontario, Canada, during the Budweiser 1000 km (1985 1000 km of Mosport) World Endurance Championship (World Sportscar Championship) event

, driving a Porsche 962C for Kremer Racing with co-driver Marc Surer. '''Clarington''' (2011 (Canada 2011 Census) population 84,548 ) is a municipality in Ontario, Canada in the Regional Municipality of Durham. It was created in 1973 with the merging of the Town of Bowmanville, and the townships of Clarke and Darlington. It took its present name in 1994 after having been known as the Town of Newcastle from 1974-93


extensive water

in the township of Darlington, County Durham. It was a station of the Grand Trunk Railway. It was established on the north shore of Lake Ontario. It possessed a good harbour and there was extensive water power in the vicinity. The surrounding country was fertile. The province of Ontario gazetteer and directory. H. McEvoy Editor and Compiler, Toronto : Robertson & Cook, Publishers, 1869 The success of the Vanstone Mill, fueled by the machinery of the Crown's land grant program, led to the rapid expansion of the Bowmanville settlement in the early years of the 19th century. Under the generous yet discriminate eyes of wealthy local merchants such as John Simpson and Charles Bowman, small properties would often be sold to promote settlement and small business. The town soon developed a balanced economy; all the while gradually establishing itself as a moderate player in shipping, rail transport, metal works and common minor business (including tanneries, liveries, stables and everyday mercantile commodity exchange). By the time of Confederation (Confederation of Canada), Bowmanville was a vital, prosperous and growing town, home to a largely Scots (Scottish people)-Presbyterian community with all manner of farmers, working, and professional class making the town their home. With local economic stability and accessible, abundant land available for the construction of housing, the town soon sported several new churches, each designated to house both Free and Auld Kirk (Presbyterian Church in Canada), Anglican and Protestant congregations, including the Bible Christian Church, later to be a major stream of Canadian Methodism. At present, St. John's Anglican Church. St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, St. Paul's United Church (United Church of Canada) and the impressively ornate Trinity United Church (site of an old Auld Kirk church) still serve the community. All of these edifices, appropriately, lie on or are in close proximity to present-day Church Street. In the 19th century, in 1857, the Ontario Bank was founded in Bowmanville, with local resident John Simpson as its first president. The bank, while appearing to be a local enterprise, was primarily controlled by 16 Montreal businessmen. The Ontario bank eventually opened local branches including locations in Whitby, Oshawa, and Port Hope. In 1874, it was moved to Toronto, and would later become insolvent as a result of investing in speculative stocks in 1906. Humber, William."A Small Town On The Edge". Natural Heritage Natural History Inc.,1997, p19-21 The historic Ontario Bank building at the intersection of King and Temperance was demolished in 1971 Humber, William."A Small Town On The Edge".Natural Heritage Natural History Inc.,1997, p121 In 1884, Scottish immigrant John McKay opened the Cream of Barley Mill next to Soper Creek to manufacture a cereal of his own creation. "Cream of Barley" was shipped throughout the British Empire. Taws, Charles. "When Barley was King!" ''ClaringtonPromoter'', December 2012. Local business organized and modernized in the 20th century, with the Dominion Organ and Piano factory, Specialty Paper Company, the Bowmanville Foundry, and the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company (1910) all providing steady work for Bowmanville's ever-growing working populations. Goodyear even went so far as to provide affordable housing for its employees, and present day Carlisle Ave. (built by magnanimous Goodyear president W.C. Carlisle) in the 1910s still stands as one of Ontario's best preserved examples of industrial housing. The land on which the Bowmanville Hospital was built was donated by J.W. Alexander, the owner of the then-prospering Dominion Organ and Piano factory. Formal education evolved in-step with Ryersonian philosophies of the day, and the advent of the Central Public School (1889) and the Bowmanville High School (1890), (both designed by Whitby architect A.A. Post) were the finishing touches to the town that was a model of then-Ontario Premier Oliver Mowat's philosophy of education, expansion and innovation for the citizens of the province. The 20th century saw a steady rise in the construction of area schools, with Vincent Massey P.S. (1955); Waverley P.S. (1978); Dr. Ross Tilley P.S. (1993); John M. James P.S. (1999) and Harold Longworth P.S. (2003) all accommodating gradual population increases and building developments in specific demographic areas of the town. The local school board was amalgamated with neighboring jurisdictions to form the Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board in 1997. As the town grew and prospered, so arrived Bowmanville's grand era of architectural building and refinement. Many excellently maintained specimens of Italianate, Gothic Revival, Colonial Brick and Queen Anne architecture remain in Bowmanville's older central neighborhoods. Much of Bowmanville's residential and commercial architectural heritage was either lost or threatened by demolition and modern development from 1950 to 1980, but a 25 year renaissance in appreciation and awareness (led largely by local historians and LACAC members) helped to preserve the precious remnants of days gone by. Bowmanville was incorporated as a village in 1852 and as a town in 1858. In 1974, the town was amalgamated with neighbouring Clarke Township (Clarke Township, Ontario) and Darlington Township (Darlington Township, Ontario) to form the '''Town of Newcastle''' as part of the municipal restructuring that created the Regional Municipality of Durham. The Town of Newcastle was renamed '''Municipality of Clarington''' in 1994. Subdivided housing developments first arrived in the 1950s, with a significant increase in housing development through the 1980s and 1990s. The population rose to about 10,000 in the 1970s, about 20,000 in the 1980s, about 25,000 in the 1990s and today is about 35,000. Transportation improvements in the 1980s included a widening of Highway 401 (first built through Bowmanville in 1952) to six lanes and of Highway 2 to 4 5 lanes. Many have referred to this as the "Lane Era" of Bowmanville. Prisoner of war camp Camp 30, the Lake Ontario Officers' Camp-Bowmanville, held captive German army officers from the Afrika Korps, fliers from the Luftwaffe and naval officers from the Kriegsmarine. Farms surrounded the camp that had been a delinquent boys' school prior to the war. In several accounts by former POWs, the prison was represented as very humane, in that the prisoners were well treated and well fed. Among the German officers transferred from England to Bowmanville was Korvettenkapitän Otto Kretschmer, who was the top U-boat ace of World War II. Kretschmer assumed the duties of the senior naval officer, sharing the command with the senior Luftwaffe officer Oberstleutnant Hans Hefele and the senior army officer General Leutnant Hans von Ravenstein. The Bowmanville boys' school had been quickly turned into a POW camp by surrounding the existing school buildings with a barbed wire fence. The facility, which had been designed to house 300 boys, was cramped and undersized for grown men. Two '''Darlington Provincial Park''' is a part of the Ontario Provincial Parks system. It is located just south of Highway 401 (Highway 401 (Ontario)) near the town of Courtice, between the cities of Bowmanville and Oshawa. A small park, the topography is dominated by gentle hills, a terminal moraine deposited by glaciers at the end of the last Ice Age. The park borders on the northern shore of Lake Ontario also encloses McLaughlin Bay. The Bay is shallow, and at some point in the 1990s was completely closed off from the lake by the action of the waves. The property bordering the park to the west is the home of General Motors Corporation's Canadian headquarters.


quot natural

. Humber, William."A Small Town On The Edge". Natural Heritage Natural History Inc.,1997, p19-21 The historic Ontario Bank building at the intersection of King and Temperance was demolished in 1971 Humber, William."A Small Town On The Edge".Natural Heritage Natural History Inc.,1997, p121 In 1884, Scottish immigrant John McKay opened the Cream of Barley Mill next to Soper Creek to manufacture a cereal of his own creation. "


establishing

east of Oshawa (Oshawa, Ontario) along Highway 2 (Highway 2 (Ontario)). The Town of Bowmanville was a stand-alone incorporated municipality from 1858 to 1973. Bowmanville is located in the Greater Toronto Area. Geography Bowmanville is surrounded by rural areas on three sides, and Lake Ontario to the south. Farmland formerly covered central Bowmanville until the population increased, thus establishing a nascent downtown core by the early 19th century. There is a harbour

program, led to the rapid expansion of the Bowmanville settlement in the early years of the 19th century. Under the generous yet discriminate eyes of wealthy local merchants such as John Simpson and Charles Bowman, small properties would often be sold to promote settlement and small business. The town soon developed a balanced economy; all the while gradually establishing itself as a moderate player in shipping, rail transport, metal works and common minor business (including tanneries, liveries

company, McLaughlin Carriage Works, at one time the largest manufacturer of horse-drawn buggies and sleighs in the British Empire. With engines from William C. Durant of Buick he produced the McLaughlin-Buick Model F, establishing The McLaughlin Motor Car Company, incorporated on November 20, 1907. In 1908, its first full year of operation, it produced 154 cars. In 1910 he became a director of General Motors (General Motors Corporation) and sold his company in 1918 becoming president


creation quot

. Humber, William."A Small Town On The Edge". Natural Heritage Natural History Inc.,1997, p19-21 The historic Ontario Bank building at the intersection of King and Temperance was demolished in 1971 Humber, William."A Small Town On The Edge".Natural Heritage Natural History Inc.,1997, p121 In 1884, Scottish immigrant John McKay opened the Cream of Barley Mill next to Soper Creek to manufacture a cereal of his own creation. "Cream of Barley" was shipped throughout the British Empire. Taws, Charles. "When Barley was King!" ''ClaringtonPromoter'', December 2012. Local business organized and modernized in the 20th century, with the Dominion Organ and Piano factory, Specialty Paper Company, the Bowmanville Foundry, and the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company (1910) all providing steady work for Bowmanville's ever-growing working populations. Goodyear even went so far as to provide affordable housing for its employees, and present day Carlisle Ave. (built by magnanimous Goodyear president W.C. Carlisle) in the 1910s still stands as one of Ontario's best preserved examples of industrial housing. The land on which the Bowmanville Hospital was built was donated by J.W. Alexander, the owner of the then-prospering Dominion Organ and Piano factory. Formal education evolved in-step with Ryersonian philosophies of the day, and the advent of the Central Public School (1889) and the Bowmanville High School (1890), (both designed by Whitby architect A.A. Post) were the finishing touches to the town that was a model of then-Ontario Premier Oliver Mowat's philosophy of education, expansion and innovation for the citizens of the province. The 20th century saw a steady rise in the construction of area schools, with Vincent Massey P.S. (1955); Waverley P.S. (1978); Dr. Ross Tilley P.S. (1993); John M. James P.S. (1999) and Harold Longworth P.S. (2003) all accommodating gradual population increases and building developments in specific demographic areas of the town. The local school board was amalgamated with neighboring jurisdictions to form the Kawartha Pine Ridge District School Board in 1997. As the town grew and prospered, so arrived Bowmanville's grand era of architectural building and refinement. Many excellently maintained specimens of Italianate, Gothic Revival, Colonial Brick and Queen Anne architecture remain in Bowmanville's older central neighborhoods. Much of Bowmanville's residential and commercial architectural heritage was either lost or threatened by demolition and modern development from 1950 to 1980, but a 25 year renaissance in appreciation and awareness (led largely by local historians and LACAC members) helped to preserve the precious remnants of days gone by. Bowmanville was incorporated as a village in 1852 and as a town in 1858. In 1974, the town was amalgamated with neighbouring Clarke Township (Clarke Township, Ontario) and Darlington Township (Darlington Township, Ontario) to form the '''Town of Newcastle''' as part of the municipal restructuring that created the Regional Municipality of Durham. The Town of Newcastle was renamed '''Municipality of Clarington''' in 1994. Subdivided housing developments first arrived in the 1950s, with a significant increase in housing development through the 1980s and 1990s. The population rose to about 10,000 in the 1970s, about 20,000 in the 1980s, about 25,000 in the 1990s and today is about 35,000. Transportation improvements in the 1980s included a widening of Highway 401 (first built through Bowmanville in 1952) to six lanes and of Highway 2 to 4 5 lanes. Many have referred to this as the "Lane Era" of Bowmanville. Prisoner of war camp Camp 30, the Lake Ontario Officers' Camp-Bowmanville, held captive German army officers from the Afrika Korps, fliers from the Luftwaffe and naval officers from the Kriegsmarine. Farms surrounded the camp that had been a delinquent boys' school prior to the war. In several accounts by former POWs, the prison was represented as very humane, in that the prisoners were well treated and well fed. Among the German officers transferred from England to Bowmanville was Korvettenkapitän Otto Kretschmer, who was the top U-boat ace of World War II. Kretschmer assumed the duties of the senior naval officer, sharing the command with the senior Luftwaffe officer Oberstleutnant Hans Hefele and the senior army officer General Leutnant Hans von Ravenstein. The Bowmanville boys' school had been quickly turned into a POW camp by surrounding the existing school buildings with a barbed wire fence. The facility, which had been designed to house 300 boys, was cramped and undersized for grown men. Two '''Darlington Provincial Park''' is a part of the Ontario Provincial Parks system. It is located just south of Highway 401 (Highway 401 (Ontario)) near the town of Courtice, between the cities of Bowmanville and Oshawa. A small park, the topography is dominated by gentle hills, a terminal moraine deposited by glaciers at the end of the last Ice Age. The park borders on the northern shore of Lake Ontario also encloses McLaughlin Bay. The Bay is shallow, and at some point in the 1990s was completely closed off from the lake by the action of the waves. The property bordering the park to the west is the home of General Motors Corporation's Canadian headquarters.


elaborate

of the war. A daily routine of exercise, sporting events and work assignments was established. As well as English being taught, professors from the nearby University of Toronto gave lectures for university credit classes. A school was also formed, which taught midshipmen seamanship and navigation courses. Current movies were shown each week. National and religious holidays were observed, and music concerts were given regularly. Elaborate stage plays were produced. Extraordinary puppets were


newcastle

footnotes '''Bowmanville''' is the largest community in the Municipality of Clarington (Clarington, Ontario) (formerly known as the Town of Newcastle) in Durham Region (Regional Municipality of Durham), Ontario, Canada. It is located in Southern Ontario about 75 km east of Toronto and 15 km

8,947 - style "text-align:right;" !Town of !Newcastle - - style "text-align:right;" 1981 32,229 - style "text-align:right;" 1991 49,479 - style "text-align:right;" !Bowmanville- !Newcastle - ! !(urban area) - - style "text-align:right;" 2001 32,777 - style "text-align:right;" 2006 38,966 - style "text-align:right;" 2011 43,555 - style "text-align:right;" Settlers were attracted to the area

, the town was amalgamated with neighbouring Clarke Township (Clarke Township, Ontario) and Darlington Township (Darlington Township, Ontario) to form the '''Town of Newcastle''' as part of the municipal restructuring that created the Regional Municipality of Durham. The Town of Newcastle was renamed '''Municipality of Clarington''' in 1994. Subdivided housing developments first arrived in the 1950s, with a significant increase in housing development through the 1980s and 1990s. The population


stage plays

of the war. A daily routine of exercise, sporting events and work assignments was established. As well as English being taught, professors from the nearby University of Toronto gave lectures for university credit classes. A school was also formed, which taught midshipmen seamanship and navigation courses. Current movies were shown each week. National and religious holidays were observed, and music concerts were given regularly. Elaborate stage plays were produced. Extraordinary puppets were

Bowmanville

'''Bowmanville''' is the largest community in the Municipality of Clarington (Clarington, Ontario) (formerly known as the Town of Newcastle) in Durham Region (Regional Municipality of Durham), Ontario, Canada. It is located in Southern Ontario about 75 km east of Toronto and 15 km east of Oshawa (Oshawa, Ontario) along Highway 2 (Highway 2 (Ontario)). The Town of Bowmanville was a stand-alone incorporated municipality from 1858 to 1973.

Bowmanville is located in the Greater Toronto Area.

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