Boston

What is Boston known for?


program shows

been more than 500 films broadcast. Although primarily seen through television, the program shows a large portion of their shows in interactive webcasts on their main website. According to a 1990 study on ayurvedic medicines in India, 41% of the products tested contained arsenic, and 64% contained lead and mercury. A 2004 study found toxic levels of heavy metals in 20% of ayurvedic preparations made in South Asia and sold in the Boston area, and concluded


liberal interpretation

Before his death, he took lodging at the retreat of Mineral Spring Pond to recover from his illness and drink from the famous healing waters of the springs from Spring Pond. The Register of the Lynn Historical Society, Volumes 15-16 By Lynn Historical Society, page 105 thumb right 200px Birthplace, Irving Street, Beacon Hill, Boston (File:Charles Sumner birthplace.jpg) Sumner was born on Irving Street in Boston on January 6, 1811. He was the son of Charles Pinckney Sumner, a progressive Harvard (Harvard University)-educated lawyer, abolitionist, and early proponent of racially integrated schools, who shocked 19th century Boston by opposing anti-miscegenation laws. "Charles Sumner." Dictionary of American Biography Base Set. American Council of Learned Societies, 1928-1936. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2009. available online His father had been born in poverty Donald, David Herbert. ''Charles Sumner and the Coming Civil War.'' New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1960, pp. ?? and his mother shared a similar background and worked as a seamstress prior to her marriage. Sumner's parents were described as exceedingly formal and undemonstrative. His father's legal practice was a failure, and throughout Sumner's childhood his family teetered on the edge of the middle class. ref


scenes selling

Empire in Anatolia between 1894 and 1896. Francis, Arlene with Florence Rome. ''Arlene Francis: A Memoir''. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978. pp. 4-5 He emigrated to the United States and became a portrait photographer, opening his own studio in Boston in the early 20th century. Later in life, Kazanjian painted canvases of dogwoods, "rabbits in flight," and other nature scenes, selling them at auction in New York. Francis, Arlene with Florence Rome. ''Arlene Francis: A Memoir''. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978. pp. 11–13. WOR-TV didn't get a network affiliation, but it did get a new owner in 1952, when Macy's Bamberger's sold the WOR stations to the General Tire and Rubber Company, which already had broadcasting interests in four cities: in Boston, with the regional Yankee Radio Network and WNAC-AM (WRKO)-FM (WBMX-FM)-TV (WHDH-TV) there; in Memphis (Memphis, Tennessee), with WHBQ (WHBQ (AM)) radio (who would launch a new television station (WHBQ-TV) a year later); and KHJ-AM (KHJ (AM))-FM (KRTH-FM)-TV (KCAL-TV) in Los Angeles and KFRC-AM (KFRC (defunct))-FM (KMEL) in San Francisco. The outlets in the latter two cities were operated by General Tire subsidiary Don Lee Broadcasting (Don Lee (broadcaster)), and the WOR stations were assigned to this subsidiary. In 1955, General Tire purchased RKO Radio Pictures, giving the company's TV stations access to RKO's film library, and soon after General Tire merged its broadcast interests as '''General Teleradio'''. In 1959, General Tire's broadcasting and film divisions were renamed as '''RKO General'''. In the 1980s, Cablevision also expanded into the Chicago, Boston, and Cleveland areas. By the mid-1990s Cablevision would offer service to 2.9 million subscribers in 19 states. Through a series of transactions in the late 1990s, Cablevision decided to consolidate their cable systems into three core areas: New York, Cleveland, and Boston. Despite reducing the number of areas served they were able to bring the number of subscribers to 3.5 million through these transactions. One major transaction made at this time was with Tele-Communications Inc. (TCI). Cablevision gained 10 New York area cable systems from TCI and in exchange TCI gained 33% ownership in the company. In 1999, AT&T took over TCI thus giving them the one-third ownership in Cablevision. Cablevision Systems Corp Cooperate History In 2000, Cablevision sold-off its remaining systems outside of the New York area in Boston, Cleveland, and Kalamazoo, Michigan to Media One, Adelphia (Adelphia Communications Corporation), and Charter Communications respectively. AT&T sold its share of Cablevision in 2001. The tunnel, which opened on November 23, 1985, closed a gap in the East Coast’s most important interstate route, Interstate 95 (Interstate 95 in Maryland), between Maine and Florida. It also is the largest underwater highway tunnel built by the immersed tube method and the widest vehicular tunnel ever built by that same method. Maryland Transportation Authority, Baltimore, MD (2010). "The Fort McHenry Tunnel." Fact sheet. At the time of its opening it was the most expensive underwater tunnel project in the United States, but that figure has since been surpassed by the Big Dig project in Boston. DCRoads.net. "Fort McHenry Tunnel: Historic Overview." Accessed 2011-07-11. The Fort McHenry Tunnel is one of seven toll facilities operated and maintained by the Maryland Transportation Authority. He seems to have been the son of a painter, and to have had a studio in Boston in 1750-1765; among his patrons were many important early American families, including the Apthorps (Charles Apthorp), Amorys, Bulfinches, Lowells (Lowell family), Ewings, Saltonstalls, Winthrops, Winslows and Oties of Boston. History State Street provides core investment custody, fund or investment securities accounting, fund administration, securities finance and transfer agent services to insitutional clients like those named above. It provides these services in North American cities including Boston and other eastern MA cities like Quincy, Massachusetts, and New York City, Kansas City (Kansas City, Missouri), Toronto, and Irvine (Irvine, California) CA and many international financial center cities like London, Frankfurt, Munich, Cologne, Vienna, Grand Cayman, Hong Kong, Beijing, Dublin, Luxembourg and Tokyo. It has recently outsourced or offshored parts of its operations to joint venture operations in Mumbai, Pune and Krakow in an effort to reduce labor costs and match competitor custodians and wall street firms following the same strategy. birth_date commons:Boston


blue frequent

, Mendoza, Rosario, Montevideo and Asuncion. AR will place its code on AF and KL service to Nice, Marseille, Toulouse, Lyon and Bordeaux and other European destinations, including Berlin and Munich. Furthermore, mileage earned by cardholders of Aerolíneas Plus and Flying Blue frequent flyer programmes can be redeemed in either airline. title Aerolíneas


views including

commons:Boston


difficult works

in 2001, turning the reins over to Dan Bane. Shields still does consulting for the company. Caldwell moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1952 and became head of the Boston University opera workshop. In 1957 she started the Boston Opera Group, which became the Opera Company of Boston, where she staged a wide range of operas, establishing a reputation for producing difficult works under pressure. She was also known for putting together interesting variations on standard operas


silver line

, for instance Frankfurt Airport, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, London Heathrow Airport, London Gatwick Airport and London Stansted Airport. It is also common to connect an airport and a city with rapid transit, light rail lines or other non-road public transport systems, for instance the AirTrain JFK at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York (Transportation in New York City) and the Silver Line (Silver Line (MBTA)) T at Boston's Logan International Airport by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). Such a connection lowers risk of missed flights due to traffic congestion. Large airports usually have access also through controlled-access highways ('freeways' or 'motorways') from which motor vehicles enter either the departure loop or the arrival loop. Americas BBC shortwave broadcasts to this region were traditionally enhanced by the Atlantic Relay Station and the Caribbean Relay Company, a station in Antigua run jointly with Deutsche Welle. In addition, an exchange agreement with Radio Canada International gave access to their station in New Brunswick. However, "changing listening habits" led the World Service to end shortwave radio transmission directed to North America and Australasia on 1 July 2001. Pages 1-136 from BBC AR Cover 03 commons:Boston


year green

title Green Day publisher Biography Channel date September 11, 2009 accessdate September 6, 2010 ''Dookie'' became a commercial success, helped by extensive MTV airplay for the videos of the songs "Longview (Longview (song))", "Basket Case (Basket Case (song))", and "When I Come Around", all of which reached the number one position on the Modern Rock Tracks charts. That year, Green Day embarked on a nationwide tour with queercore


major+attention

magazines and annuals, though none drew major attention to the author. Horatio Bridge offered to cover the risk of collecting these stories in the spring of 1837 into one volume, ''Twice-Told Tales'', which made Hawthorne known locally. McFarland, 22–23 '''Boston Bruins''' Boston, MA (Massachusetts) TD Garden New England has many local lagers and ales. Notable examples include Samuel Adams (Samuel Adams (beer)) of the Boston Beer Company in Boston (even though the recipe for the beer does not come from New England); Sea Dog Brewing Company of Bangor (Bangor, Maine); Shipyard Brewing Company of Portland (Portland, Maine); and Smuttynose Brewing Company of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Vermont-based Woodchuck Draft Cider is a popular alcoholic cider. '''Boston Celtics''' Boston, MA (Massachusetts) TD Garden In 1959, a letter in the ''Bulletin of Atomic Scientists'' was the start of a successful campaign to stop the Atomic Energy Commission (United States Atomic Energy Commission) dumping radioactive waste in the sea 19 kilometres from Boston. Jim Falk (1982). ''Global Fission: The Battle Over Nuclear Power'', Oxford University Press, p. 93. In 1962, Linus Pauling won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to stop the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, and the "Ban the Bomb" movement spread. Jerry Brown and Rinaldo Brutoco (1997). ''Profiles in Power: The Anti-nuclear Movement and the Dawn of the Solar Age'', Twayne Publishers, pp. 191-192. *1888 – The Convention of Constantinople is signed, guaranteeing free maritime passage through the Suez Canal during war and peace. *1901 – In Amherst, Massachusetts nurse Jane Toppan is arrested for murdering the Davis family of Boston with an overdose of morphine. * 1901 – Capital punishment: Leon Czolgosz, the assassin of U.S. President William McKinley, is executed by electrocution. *1958 – Fifth Republic (French Fifth Republic) of France is established. *1960 – Eastern Air Lines Flight 375, a Lockheed L-188 Electra, crashes after a bird strike on takeoff from Boston's Logan International Airport, killing 62 of 72 on board. *1963 – Hurricane Flora, kills 6,000 in Cuba and Haiti. In the past criminal organizations have naturally limited themselves by their need to expand, putting them in competition with each other. This competition, often leading to violence, uses valuable resources such as manpower (either killed or sent to prison), equipment and finances. In the United States, the Irish Mob boss of the Winter Hill Gang (in the 1980s) turned informant for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He used this position to eliminate competition and consolidate power within the city of Boston which led to the imprisonment of several senior organized crime figures including Gennaro Angiulo, underboss of the Patriarca crime family. Infighting sometimes occurs within an organization, such as the Castellamarese war of 1930–31 and the Boston Irish Mob Wars of the 1960s and 1970s. One of the major technical innovations that helped to create the sound of the modern piano was the use of a strong iron frame. Also called the "plate", the iron frame sits atop the soundboard (Sound board (music)), and serves as the primary bulwark against the force of string tension (Tension (physics)). The increased structural integrity of the iron frame allowed the use of thicker, tenser, and more numerous strings. In a modern grand the total string tension can exceed 20 tons. The single piece cast iron frame was patented in 1825 in Boston by Alpheus Babcock, combining the metal hitch pin plate (1821, claimed by Broadwood on behalf of Samuel Hervé) and resisting bars (Thom and Allen, 1820, but also claimed by Broadwood and Érard). Babcock later worked for the Chickering & Mackays (Chickering and Sons) firm who patented the first full iron frame for grand pianos in 1843. Composite forged metal frames were preferred by many European makers until the American system was fully adopted by the early 20th century. Emigration Emigration has been a major part of Puerto Rico's recent history as well. Starting in the post-World War II period, due to poverty, cheap airfares, their U.S. citizenship, and promotion by the island government, waves of Puerto Ricans moved to the continental United States, particularly to New York City; Newark (Newark, New Jersey), Jersey City (Jersey City, New Jersey), Paterson (Paterson, New Jersey), and Camden (Camden, New Jersey), New Jersey; Chicago; Providence, Rhode Island; Springfield (Springfield, Massachusetts) and Boston, Massachusetts; Orlando (Orlando, Florida), Miami (Miami, Florida) and Tampa (Tampa, Florida), Florida; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Hartford, Connecticut; Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles, California. This continued even as Puerto Rico's economy improved and its birth rate declined. Emigration continues at the present time, and this, combined with Puerto Rico's slumping below-replacement birth rate, suggests that the island's population will age rapidly and start to decline sometime within the next couple of decades. The 2010 Census in fact recorded Puerto Rico's first population drop in history. The word Nuyorican is sometimes used to describe Puerto Rican New Yorkers. In 1789 the US Marshals Service was established, followed by other federal services such as the US Parks Police (1791) commons:Boston


version early

pdfarchive view 1993 1993%20-%200640.html accessdate - The play had 231 performances in New York before going to Boston and then a cross country tour. The play's success spawned a fashion in green hats of the type worn by Cornell in the play. Later, Talullah Bankhead played the role of Iris March in a failed London production, and Greta Garbo played the role in a movie version. Early life !--Please do not remove referenced information

Boston

'''Boston''' (pronounced Included in the CSA: MA counties: Bristol, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, Suffolk and Worcester; NH counties: Belknap, Hillsborough, Merrimack, Rockingham and Strafford; RI counties (entire state): Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence and Washington (South County)

One of the oldest cities in the United States, Boston was founded on the Shawmut Peninsula in 1630 by Puritan settlers from England.

The area's many colleges and universities make Boston an international center of higher education and medicine, and the city is considered to be a world leader in innovation for a variety of reasons.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017