Bernicia

What is Bernicia known for?


natural feature

and, having been taken prisoner, was one of only four (or two) Brythonic survivors. He remained a captive until his ransom was paid by Ceneu ap Llywarch Hen. Early history Castle Hill, on which Stirling Castle is built, forms part of the Stirling Sill, a formation of quartz-dolerite around 350 million years old, which was subsequently modified by glaciation to form a "crag and tail". Fawcett, p.14 It is likely that this natural feature


period location

of the Pictish period. Location The name Rheged appears regularly as an epithet of a certain Urien in a number of early Welsh poems and royal genealogies. His victories over the Anglian (Angles) chieftains of Bernicia in the second half of the sixth century are recorded by Nennius and celebrated by the bard Taliesin, who calls him "Ruler of Rheged". He is thus placed squarely in the North of Britain and more specifically in Westmorland when referred


amp book'

and Deira (Deira (kingdom)). His authority ran from the lands of the Picts and the Dál Riata in modern Scotland to Wales and the Midlands (English Midlands) in the south. Bede, ''Ecclesiastical History'', Book I, Chapter 34 & Book II, Chapter 3. Æthelfrith's power rested on his military success, and this success came to an end in 616, when the exiled Edwin of Deira, with the support of King Rædwald, defeated and killed him in battle by the River Idle


historical knowledge

once again under a single ruler, and promoted the spread of Christianity in Northumbria. He was given a strongly positive assessment by the historian Bede, writing a little less than a century after Oswald's death, who regarded Oswald as a saintly king; it is also Bede who is the main source for present-day historical knowledge of Oswald. After eight years of rule, in which he was the most powerful ruler in Britain (Great Britain), Oswald was killed in the Battle of Maserfield. url


national biography

-Harting "Ecgberht (d. 766)" ''Oxford Dictionary of National Biography'' He studied under Bede, who visited him in 733 at York. Blair ''World of Bede'' p. 305 - 604 Æthelfrith (Æthelfrith of Northumbria) unites Bernicia and Deira (Deira (kingdom)) to form the kingdom of Northumbria. - This period has attracted a great deal of academic and popular debate, in part because

Paulinus (d. 644)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, October 2005 accessed 30 April 2011 **'''Northumbria''' - ***'''Bernicia''' - Eanfrith of Bernicia, King of Bernicia (632–634) ***'''Deira''' - Osric of Deira, King of Deira (632–634) **'''Northumbria''' ***'''Bernicia''' - Frithuwald of Bernicia, King of Northumbria King


kings

-status residence lay the island of Lindisfarne (formerly known, in Welsh, as ''Ynys Metcaut''), which became the seat (diocese) of the Bernician bishops (Bishop of Lindisfarne). It is unknown when the Angles finally conquered the whole region, but around 604 is likely. Kings of British Bryneich There are several Old Welsh pedigrees of princely "Men of the North (Hen Ogledd)" (''Gwŷr y Gogledd'') which may represent the kings of the British kingdom in the area, which may

, Oswald appears to have been recognised by both Bernicians and Deirans as king of a properly united Northumbria. The kings of Bernicia were thereafter supreme in that kingdom, although Deira had its own sub-kings at times during the reigns of Oswiu (Oswiu of Northumbria) and his son Ecgfrith (Ecgfrith of Northumbria). Kings of Bernicia (see also List of monarchs of Northumbria) *Ida (Ida of Bernicia) son of Eoppa (547

Press. * Koch, John T. (1997). ''The Gododdin of Aneurin: Text and context from Dark-Age North Britain''. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-1374-4 * Rollason, David W. (2003). ''Northumbria, 500–1100: Creation and Destruction of a Kingdom''. Cambridge. ISBN 0-521-81335-2. Further reading * Alcock, Leslie, ''Kings and Warriors, Craftsmen and Priests in Northern Britain AD 550–850.'' Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, Edinburgh, 2003. ISBN 0-903903-24-5 * Alcock, Leslie


century writings

was formed by Æthelfrith (Æthelfrith of Northumbria) in central Great Britain in Anglo-Saxon times. At the beginning of the 7th century the two kingdoms of Bernicia and Deira were unified. (In the 12th century writings of Henry of Huntingdon the kingdom was defined as one of the Heptarchy of Anglo-Saxon (Anglo-Saxons) kingdoms.) At its greatest the kingdom extended at least from just south of the Humber, to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth Forth


568

–559) *Glappa (Glappa of Bernicia) son of Ida (559–560) *Adda (Adda of Bernicia) son of Ida (560–568) *Æthelric (Æthelric of Bernicia) son of Ida (568–572) *Theodric (Theodric of Bernicia) son of Ida (572–579) *Frithuwald (Frithuwald of Bernicia) son of Ida (579–585) *Hussa (Hussa of Bernicia), possibly son of Ida (585–593) *Æthelfrith (Æthelfrith of Northumbria), son of Æthelric (593–616) Under Deiran rule 616–633) *Eanfrith of Bernicia son of Æthelfrith (633–634) Under

forces he invaded in 1069 to claim the crown to which the old Witan had once elevated him. It was at this time, on 28 January, that the rebels converged on Durham and murdered William's newly-named earl Robert de Comines (Robert Comine), a Norman (Normans) who ignored the advice of William's ally, the bishop of Durham, Ethelwin. **'''Northumbria''' ***'''Bernicia''' - Adda (Adda of Bernicia), King of Bernicia (King of Northumbria) (560–568) ***''' Deira

(kingdom) Deira ''' - Aella (Aella of Deira), King of Deira (King of Northumbria) (560–589) **'''Northumbria''' ***'''Bernicia''' - Adda (Adda of Bernicia), King of Bernicia (King of Northumbria) (560–568) ***'''Deira (Deira (kingdom))''' - Aella (Aella of Deira), King of Deira (King of Northumbria) (560–589) **'''Northumbria''' ***'''Bernicia''' - Adda (Adda of Bernicia), King of Bernicia (King of Northumbria) (560–568


604

January (no year) -- year_end 634 year_exile_start year_exile_end event1 Shared crown with Deira (Deira (kingdom)) date_event1 604 event2 date_event2 event3 date_event3 event4

-status residence lay the island of Lindisfarne (formerly known, in Welsh, as ''Ynys Metcaut''), which became the seat (diocese) of the Bernician bishops (Bishop of Lindisfarne). It is unknown when the Angles finally conquered the whole region, but around 604 is likely. Kings of British Bryneich There are several Old Welsh pedigrees of princely "Men of the North (Hen Ogledd)" (''Gwŷr y Gogledd'') which may represent the kings of the British kingdom in the area, which may

obtained the throne and the kingdom about 547. His sons spent many years fighting a united force from the surrounding Brythonic kingdoms until their alliance collapsed into civil war. A forcibly united Northumbria Ida’s grandson, Æthelfrith (Æthelfrith of Northumbria) (Æðelfriþ), united Deira (Deira (kingdom)) with his own kingdom by force around the year 604. He ruled the two kingdoms (united as Northumbria) until he was defeated and killed by Rædwald of East Anglia (who had given


560

–559) *Glappa (Glappa of Bernicia) son of Ida (559–560) *Adda (Adda of Bernicia) son of Ida (560–568) *Æthelric (Æthelric of Bernicia) son of Ida (568–572) *Theodric (Theodric of Bernicia) son of Ida (572–579) *Frithuwald (Frithuwald of Bernicia) son of Ida (579–585) *Hussa (Hussa of Bernicia), possibly son of Ida (585–593) *Æthelfrith (Æthelfrith of Northumbria), son of Æthelric (593–616) Under Deiran rule 616–633) *Eanfrith of Bernicia son of Æthelfrith (633–634) Under

of the Britons ''Historia Brittonum'' , ch. 56. The ''Anglo-Saxon Chronicle'' elaborates that he ruled for twelve years and built the Bernician capital of Bamburgh Castle. Later, however, the ''Chronicle'' confuses his territory with the later Northumbria, saying that Ælla (Ælla of Deira), historically a king of Deira rather than Bernicia, succeeded him as king after his death. ''The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle'' (s:Anglo-Saxon Chronicle - Ingram Translation), entry for 560

forces he invaded in 1069 to claim the crown to which the old Witan had once elevated him. It was at this time, on 28 January, that the rebels converged on Durham and murdered William's newly-named earl Robert de Comines (Robert Comine), a Norman (Normans) who ignored the advice of William's ally, the bishop of Durham, Ethelwin. **'''Northumbria''' ***'''Bernicia''' - Adda (Adda of Bernicia), King of Bernicia (King of Northumbria) (560–568) ***''' Deira

Bernicia

'''Bernicia''' (Old English: ''Bernice'', ''Beornice''; Latin: ''Bernicia'') was an Anglo-Saxon (Anglo-Saxons) kingdom established by Anglian (Angles) settlers of the 6th century in what is now southeastern (Scottish Borders) Scotland and North East England.

The Anglian territory of Bernicia was approximately equivalent to the modern English counties of Northumberland and Durham (County Durham), and the former Scottish counties of Berwickshire and East Lothian, stretching from the Forth (River Forth) to the Tees (River Tees). In the early 7th century, it merged with its southern neighbour, Deira (Deira (kingdom)), to form the kingdom of Northumbria and its borders subsequently expanded considerably.

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