Beit Hanina

What is Beit Hanina known for?


public activities

Israeli court levels, including the Supreme Court of Israel, as well as in planning commissions. In the framework of his public activities, he has expressed concerns with the impacts of the lack of Arab participation in the urban politics of Jerusalem, while expressing understanding for the rationale. In 2008 he expressed concerns with a planned real estate deal between his own Orthodox Church of Jerusalem and the State of Israel.


title water

for "fair and equitable apportionment". ). Born in 1890 in the village of Beit Hanina, four miles north of Jerusalem, Shoman was raised in a stone hut, where he began his career at the age of seven as a stonemason on construction sites. Shoman emigrated to the United States of America at the age of 20 and went door-to-door selling dry-goods in New York and Baltimore. His success led him to expand and start a dress-making factory in Manhattan’s garment district. thumb 290px Arab Bank headquarters in Amman (File:Arab Bank HQ3.JPG), Jordan.


early centuries

descriptiongog01gu#page 394 mode 1up 394 Sharon, 1999, pp. 94-97. In 636, Beit Hanina was annexed by the Islamic Caliphate led by Umar Ibn al-Khattab as a result of a decisive Muslim victory over the Byzantines at the Battle of Yarmouk. In the early centuries of Islamic rule over Palestine, Yemenite and Qaisi Arabs migrated to Beit Hanina. The economy


jerusalem

longm 12 longs 58 longEW E population 1,071 (al-Balad) 26,762 (al-Jadid) popyear 2007 area 16,284 areakm 16.3 thumbnail The Israeli barrier in northern Jerusalem, which divides Beit Hanina into two villages, both in a separate enclave. (File:East Jerusalem enclaves.jpg) '''Beit Hanina''' ( ) is a Palestinian (Palestinian people) neighborhood in East Jerusalem. It is on the road to Ramallah, eight

kilometers north of central Jerusalem, at an elevation of 780 meters above sea level. Jerusalem neighborhoods Beit Hanina is bordered by Hizma to the east, Shuafat to the south, Beit Iksa and Nabi Samwil to the west, and Bir Nabala, al-Jib, Kafr Aqab and ar-Ram to the north. Beit Hanina

is divided by the Israeli West Bank barrier into '''Al-Jadida''' (the new village), which is located within the Israeli Jerusalem municipality and includes the vast majority of the built-up area, and '''Al-Balad''' (the old village), which lies outside the municipality. ''High Court approves Bir Nabalah enclave''. B'Tselem, 26 November 2006 The total area of Beit Hanina is 16.3


century year

Organization Research Center * *


772

and the Shuafat refugee camp (Palestinian refugee camp). The Israeli West Bank barrier includes Pisgat Ze'ev in the northern section of the Jerusalem Municipality as defined by Israel while excluding Shuafat by running in an S-shape here. The neighborhood was established on a hilltop known in Arabic as ''Ras at-Tawill'', 772 meters above sea level, and its additional phases descend along the ridge and up to a neighboring hill. Pisgat Ze'ev has


national news

pedestrian use, the authority added." History Beit Hanina may date back to the Canaanite period. According to the 19th century French traveler Victor Guérin, Beit Hanina is the biblical Ananiah of the Tribe of Benjamin


low water

. Chenoweth states,"Already Israel and Palestine have very low water resources availability compared to the global average (Food and Agriculture Organization, 2004). In the case of Palestine, this water scarcity directly impacts upon daily life and economic activity for much of the population. With rapid population growth in the region and water resources already inadequate, the long-term hydrological future of region appears problematic."


news national

news national first-palestinian-family-evicted-from-beit-hanina-1.425157 First Palestinian family evicted from Beit Hanina . ''Haaretz''. 2012-04-19. The European Union condemned the eviction, and said they were very concerned by the plans to build a new settlement "in the midst of this traditional Palestinian neighborhood." EU condemns eviction of Palestinian family in East

Hanina and the area.'" People Connected to Beit Hanina Abdel Hamid Shoman, a native of Beit Hanina, founded the Arab Bank. His son, Abdul-Majid Shoman, succeeded his father


agricultural based

was agricultural, based primarily on olives, fig (ficus)s, barley and bulgur. Beit Hanina Community Center In 1099, Crusader (First Crusade) armies captured Jerusalem (Siege of Jerusalem (1099)), including Beit Hanina, inflicting heavy casualties on the Muslim population and causing most of the residents to flee. They later returned to cultivate their orchards and grain fields. The town was recaptured (Siege of Jerusalem (1187)) by the Ayyubid Dynasty led by Salah ad-Din (Saladin). To ensure a Muslim majority and protect it from a renewed Crusader invasion, Salah ad-Din brought powerful Bedouin tribes from the Negev desert and the northern Hejaz to settle in the area. The Friday Mosque in Beit Hanina, Sultan Ibrahim Ibn Adham Mosque, is dedicated to Ibrahim ibn Adham, Guérin had noted it was dedicated to "Sidi Ibrahim". In 1927 Tawfiq Canaan published the inscription above the gate of the mosque, which commemorated its building in 637 1239-1240 CE. Canaan, 1927:14, cited in Sharon, 1999, pp. 94 -97 Ottoman era The village was incorporated into the Ottoman Empire in 1517 with all of Palestine, and in 1596 Beit Hanina appeared in Ottoman tax registers (daftar) as being in the ''Nahiya'' of Quds of the ''Liwa (Liwa (Arabic))'' of Quds (Al-Quds). It had a population of 28 Muslim households. Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 120 Guérin, who visited in 1863, estimated that the village had 300 inhabitants, while an official Ottoman village list of about 1870 showed that "Bet Hanina" had 65 houses and a population of 240, though the population count included only men. Socin, 1879, p. 146 In 1883, the Palestine Exploration Fund's ''Survey of Western Palestine'' described it as a "village of moderate size, of stone houses, standing on very rocky ground on the ridge between two valleys. It is surrounded with olives, and has springs to the west at some little distance. Vineyards also occur near the village." Conder and Kitchener, 1883, SWP III, p. 8 British Mandate era In a census (1922 census of Palestine) conducted in 1922 by the British Mandate authorities (British Mandate of Palestine), "Bait Hanina" had a population of 996, all Muslims, Barron, 1923, Table VII, Sub-district of Jerusalem, p. 14 increasing in the 1931 census (1931 census of Palestine) to a population of 1226, still all Muslims, in 317 houses. Mills, 1932, p. 38 In 1945 Bein Hanina had a population of 1,590, all Arabs, with 14,948 dunams of land, according to an official land and population survey. Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. ''Village Statistics, April, 1945.'' Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 56 Of this, 3,072 dunams were plantations and irrigable land, 4,304 used for cereals, Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. ''Village Statistics, April, 1945.'' Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 101 while 219 dunams were built-up land. Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. ''Village Statistics, April, 1945.'' Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 151 1948 -1967 During the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, Beit Hanina was captured by Jordanian forces, along with the rest of the West Bank, and became a part of Jordan (Jordanian occupation of the West Bank) until 1967. Under Jordanian rule, new roads and schools were built, and many of the town's émigrés invested in the development of a modern suburb, then known as Ras al-Tariq, located to the east along the Jerusalem-Ramallah highway. 1967, and aftermath After the 1967 Six-Day War, the Israelis occupied the West Bank, along with Beit Hanina, and the municipal boundaries of Jerusalem were expanded to include the eastern section of Beit Hanina, now known as Beit Hanina al-Jadid, and formalized that policy in 1980 (Jerusalem Law). In the post 1967 era, according to Ibrahim Mattar, "The first objective of the Israeli planners in drawing these new boundaries was to maximize the land area and minimize the Palestinian population to be included in greater East Jerusalem. By examining the map, one can identify a number of Palestinian villages which have been excluded from the boundaries of greater East Jerusalem but whose lands have been included in these boundaries. For example, in the west, the villages of Beit Iksa and Beit Hanina are considered outside the boundaries while their lands are inside." ). Born in 1890 in the village of Beit Hanina, four miles north of Jerusalem, Shoman was raised in a stone hut, where he began his career at the age of seven as a stonemason on construction sites. Shoman emigrated to the United States of America at the age of 20 and went door-to-door selling dry-goods in New York and Baltimore. His success led him to expand and start a dress-making factory in Manhattan’s garment district. thumb 290px Arab Bank headquarters in Amman (File:Arab Bank HQ3.JPG), Jordan.

Beit Hanina

thumbnail The Israeli barrier in northern Jerusalem, which divides Beit Hanina into two villages, both in a separate enclave. (File:East Jerusalem enclaves.jpg)

'''Beit Hanina''' ( ) is a Palestinian (Palestinian people) neighborhood in East Jerusalem. It is on the road to Ramallah, eight kilometers north of central Jerusalem, at an elevation of 780 meters above sea level. Jerusalem neighborhoods Beit Hanina is bordered by Hizma to the east, Shuafat to the south, Beit Iksa and Nabi Samwil to the west, and Bir Nabala, al-Jib, Kafr Aqab and ar-Ram to the north.

Beit Hanina is divided by the Israeli West Bank barrier into '''Al-Jadida''' (the new village), which is located within the Israeli Jerusalem municipality and includes the vast majority of the built-up area, and '''Al-Balad''' (the old village), which lies outside the municipality. ''High Court approves Bir Nabalah enclave''. B'Tselem, 26 November 2006 The total area of Beit Hanina is 16.3 sq. kilometers (6.3 sq. miles) or 16,284 dunams, of which 2,775 are built up. ''Lands of Beit Hanina (Al-Balad) village threatened by the Israeli Segregation Wall''. Applied Research Institute (ARIJ), 8 August 2006

In 2007, Beit Hanina had a population of over 27,000, including 26,762 Jerusalem residents in the new village

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