Bayt Jibrin

What is Bayt Jibrin known for?


excellence quot

Guvrin"). Encyclopedia Judaica, Bet Guvrin, p.731, Keter Publishing, Jerusalem, 1978 Excavations at Eleutheropolis show a prosperous city, and confirm the presence of Jews and Christians in the area. It was described as one of Palestine's five "Cities of Excellence" by 4th-century Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus. The City of Eleutheropolis


powerful quot

to Israel'', Zev Vilnay, Hamakor Press, Jerusalem 1972, p.276 Another name in medieval times may have been ''Beit Jibril'', meaning "house of Gabriel". In Arabic (Arabic language), ''Bayt Jibrin'' or ''Jubrin'' ( بيت جبرين ) means "house of the powerful", Khalidi, 1992, p. 209-210. reflecting its original Aramaic name. ref name "


personal story

. The Israelis, however, did not allow them to return. Several men of Beit Jibreen were killed when they tried to go back. Israel after 1948 In 1949, a Jewish communal settlement, Kibbutz Beit Guvrin (Beit Guvrin, Israel), was founded on the former town's lands. ref name "Morris" >


quot large

'' correspondent reported that thousands of Jaffa's inhabitants had fled inland, including "large numbers" to the Bayt Jibrin area. NYT, 4 5 48, quoted in Khalidi, 1992, p. 209-210. In October 1948, the Israeli Army (Israel Defense Forces) (IDF) launched Operation Yoav, which differed from operations three months earlier, as the IDF was now equipped with aircraft, artillery, and tanks. On October 15–16, the IDF launched bombing and strafing attacks


illustrations

. Drawn up from the original diaries, with historical illustrations '', Visited "Beit Jibrin" in 1838. *Schölch, Alexander (1993): ''Palestine in Transformation, 1856-1882,'' ISBN 0-88728-234-2, * (Bayt Jibrin

location Albuquerque isbn 0-8263-0490-7 * *William McClure Thomson, (1859): '' The Land and the Book: Or, Biblical Illustrations Drawn from the Manners and Customs


quot strong

by the Hasmonean king, John Hyrcanus I, after which the region of Idumea (the Greek name of Edom) remained under Hasmonean control and Idumeans were forced to convert to Judaism. In 40 BC the Parthians (Parthian Empire) devastated completely the "strong city", after which it was never rebuilt. After this date, nearby '''Beit Guvrin''' succeeded Maresha as the chief center of the area. Roman and Byzantine periods In the Jewish War (First Jewish–Roman War) (68 CE


quot strong'

by the Hasmonean king, John Hyrcanus I, after which the region of Idumea (the Greek name of Edom) remained under Hasmonean control and Idumeans were forced to convert to Judaism. In 40 BC the Parthians (Parthian Empire) devastated completely the "strong city", after which it was never rebuilt. After this date, nearby '''Beit Guvrin''' succeeded Maresha as the chief center of the area. Roman and Byzantine periods In the Jewish War (First Jewish–Roman War) (68 CE


bliss

excavations of Maresha's many quarried systems and invite visitors to participate. The remains of the city of '''Maresha''' on Tell Sandahanna Tel Maresha were first excavated in 1898-900 by Bliss (Frederick J. Bliss) and Macalister (R.A. Stewart Macalister), who uncovered a planned and fortified Hellenistic city encircled by a town wall with towers. Two Hellenistic and one Israelite stratum were identified by them on the mound. Located some 1,300 feet above sea level, the ground


people strong

) died with the mortality rate in the district reaching 68 per 1,000. Crops remained unharvested due to lack of people strong enough to work in the fields. The new British regime began a program of sealing open wells, improving drainage and distributing quinine across Palestine. ''An Empire in the Holy Land: Historical Geography of the British Administration in Palestine, 1917-1929'' Gideon Biger, St. Martin's Press, 1994 The massacre was cited by Yigal Allon as the reason for the halting of the creeping annexation that included Bayt Jibrin, Qubeiba (Al-Qubayba) and Tel Maresha. Shapira, Anita. Yigal Allon; Native Son; A Biography Translated by Evelyn Abel, University of Pennsylvania Press ISBN 978-0-8122-4028-3 p 248 October 27 – November 9, 1948 Israeli capture of Bayt Jibrin, Isdud and Majdal (Ashkelon), and other important points, culminating in Operation Shmone - New pagan cities were founded in Judea at Eleutheropolis (Bayt Jibrin), Diopolis (Lydd (Lod)), and Nicopolis (Emmaus Nicopolis) (Emmaus (Emmaus Nicopolis)). Palestine. (2007). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved August 12, 2007, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Islamic rule Rafah was an important trading city during the early Arab period, and one of the towns captured by the Rashidun army under general 'Amr ibn al-'As in 635 CE. al-Biladhuri quoted in le Strange, 1890, p.xix. Al-Biladhuri lists the cities captured by Amr ibn al-'As as Ghazzah (Gaza), Sebastiya (Sebastia (Sebastia, Nablus), Nabulus, Amwas (Imwas), Kaisariyya (Caesarea), Yibna, Ludd (Lydda (Lod)), Rafh (Rafah), Bayt Jibrin, and Yaffa (Jaffa). Under the Umayyads and Abbasids, Rafah was the southernmost border of Jund Filastin ("District of Palestine"). According to Arab geographer al-Ya'qubi, it was the last town in the Province of Syria and on the road from Ramla to Egypt. le Strange, 1890, p.517. History The Islamic historian al-Biladhuri (Ahmad ibn Yahya al-Baladhuri) mentioned Yibna as one of ten towns in ''Jund Filastin'' conquered by the Rashidun army led by 'Amr ibn al-'As in the early 7th century. The conquered towns included "Ghazzah (Gaza) (Gaza), Sabastiyah (Sebastia (town)) (Samaria), Nabulus (Shechem), Kaisariyyah (Caesarea) (Cæsarea), Ludd (Lod) (Lydda), Bayt Jibrin, Amwas (Imwas) (Emmaus), Yafa (Jaffa) (Joppa), Rafah, and Yibna. (Bil. 138), quoted in le Strange, 1890, p.28 The tug-of-war between the Crusaders and various Cairo-based Muslim forces continued. After the Ayyubid (Ayyubid dynasty)s were overthrown by the Mamluks from within the palace walls in Cairo, Deir al-Balah came under Mamluk rule from 1250 to 1517. Regular mail routes (Postage stamps and postal history of Palestine) run by mounted messengers with colored sashes were introduced from Cairo to Gaza via the towns of Rafah, Wadi as-Salqa, al-Darum (Deir al-Balah), Malkas, Bayt Jibrin, Beit Hanoun, Beit Daras, Qatra, Lydda (Lod), Auja (Auja (Palestine)), Tira, Qatoun, Fahmah and Jenin, and from there to Damascus. Roads, bridges, postal stations and khans were built to accommodate the messengers. Pigeon mail service was introduced for which towers were built. Produce available in this time period in Deir al-Balah included barley, wheat, grapes and grape leaves, olives, raspberries, lemons, figs, sweet melons, pomegranates and dates. 19th century identification In 1838, American scholar Edward Robinson (Edward Robinson (scholar)) identified Bayt Jibrin as the site of ancient Eleutheropolis. Biblical researches in Palestine, 1838-52. A journal of travels in the year 1838. P. 57ff: Eleutheropolis 1856, Eleutheropolis remains a titular see in the Roman Catholic Church. Eleutheropolis in Palaestina (Titular See)


buildings+military

of Jewish Jerusalem), flourished under the Romans, who built public buildings, military installations, aqueducts (aqueduct (watercourse)) and a large amphitheater. The vita of Epiphanius of Salamis, born into a Christian family near Eleutheropolis, describes the general surroundings in Late Antique Judaea. The Panarion of Epiphanius of Salamis: Book I (Sects 1-46) By Epiphanius, Epiphanius of Salamis, Translated by Frank Williams BRILL, (1987) ISBN 90-04-07926-2 p xi ref

Bayt Jibrin

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017