Bantry

What is Bantry known for?


poems

is a notable sportsman born in Bantry. *Paris-based Irish-language poet Derry O'Sullivan has written several poems about his native Bantry. One of them, his elegy for a stillborn child, "Marbhghin 1943: Glaoch ar Liombo" ("Stillborn 1943: Calling Limbo") was singled out by the Cambridge History of Irish Literature (2006) as "one of the most achingly beautiful Irish poems of the twentieth century

." An English translation by Kaarina Hollo of the same poem won the 2012 Times Stephen Spender Prize for poetry translation, a competition open to poems in all languages and from all periods of history. *John Sullivan (John Sullivan (Irish sailor)), recipient of the Victoria Cross *Graham Canty, current Cork Football captain is from Bantry and plays for Bantry Blues along with rugby


poem called

. A substantial minority of the Irish people never forgave him for this role during the divorce crisis, permanently damaging his own standing in Irish public life. The rift prompted a nine-year old Dublin schoolboy, James Joyce, to pen a poem called ''Et Tu, Healy?''. thumb right 125px Plaque on Bantry (Image:Iarthair Chorcaí 081.jpg)'s Wolfe Tone Square commemorating Tim Healy's birth. DATE OF BIRTH 17 May 1855 PLACE OF BIRTH Bantry, County Cork DATE OF DEATH


political quot

, and in 1873 O'Neill became a Chicago policeman (Chicago Police Department). He rose through the ranks quickly, eventually serving as the Chief of Police from 1901 to 1905. He had the rare distinction, in a time when political "pull" counted for more than competence, of being re-appointed twice to the position by two different mayors. A native of Bantry, he was elected to Cork County Council in 1985, and re-elected in 1991 and 1999. He was Nominated members of Seanad


ancient connection

Head also nearby, on the peninsula south of Bantry Bay. As with many areas on Ireland's south-west coast, Bantry claims an ancient connection to the sixth-century saint Breandán (Naomh Bréanainn) the Navigator (Brendan). In Irish lore, Saint Breandán was the first person to discover America. The focus of the town is a large square, formed partly by infilling of the shallow inner harbour. In former times, this accommodated regular cattle fairs; after modernising as an urban plaza, it now features a colourful weekly market and occasional public functions. History In past centuries Bantry was a base for major pilchard fisheries, and was visited by fishing fleets from Spain, France and the Netherlands. Wolfe Tone Square in the town commemorates Theobald Wolfe Tone. Dublin-born Tone led the republican United Irishmen in what he had hoped would be a local re-run of the recent French Revolution; this was to be achieved with the help of French (France) Republicans (First French Republic) in overthrowing British (Kingdom of Great Britain) rule (''see 1798 rebellion''). The ill-fated French invasion fleet arrived in Bantry Bay and Berehaven Harbour in 1796, but its purpose was frustrated by unfavourable winds. For his efforts in preparing the local defenses against the French, Richard White, a local landowner, was created Baron Bantry in 1797 by a grateful British administration. A Viscountcy followed in 1800 and in 1816 he became the 1st Earl of Bantry. The noted mansion and gardens in the Bantry House demesne on the outskirts of the town testify to the family's status; the estate includes the "Armada Centre" devoted to the historic event. thumb upright left Irish War of Independence (Image:Irish_War_of_Independence_commemorative_plaque_Bantry.jpg) commemorative plaque During the Irish War of Independence, the 5th Cork Brigade of the Irish Republican Army was very active in Bantry, and many members remained so during the Civil War (Irish Civil War) that followed. Action by British forces included the punitive firebombing of several buildings in the town. The names of those who died between 1920 and 1923 "In Defence of the Republic" are listed on the wall of the former court house in Wolfe Tone Square. Sheltering the head of the bay is Whiddy Island, site of an important oil terminal, originally owned by Gulf Oil. On 8 January 1979 the oil tanker ''Betelgeuse'' exploded (Whiddy Island Disaster), killing all 42 crew members, as well as seven employees at the terminal. The jetty was seriously damaged, but fortunately the storage tanks were not affected. Nevertheless, 250 employees at the terminal, one of the largest employers in the region, lost their jobs. There was also significant environmental impact, and so the local fishing industry was also affected. Local interests subsequently initiated mussel-farming in the sheltered waters between Whiddy and the town, and this industry has enjoyed considerable success.


quot open

and the town, and this industry has enjoyed considerable success. An injection of money by the Irish Government in the early 1990s led to the part of the terminal being restored. The Government arranged for oil to be stored here during the First Gulf War in case of a disruption to oil supplies. Further funding led to more and more of the terminal being made operational. By 1998 it was deemed officially "open for business" once more. It passed from


wexford

Union , and Eliza Healy (née Sullivan). His elder brother Thomas Healy (Thomas Joseph Healy) (1854–1924) was a solicitor and Member of Parliament (MP) for North Wexford (North Wexford (UK Parliament constituency)), his younger brother Maurice Healy (1859–1923) a solicitor and MP for Cork City (Cork City (UK Parliament constituency)), with whom he held a life long close relationship. Healy became his sternest and most sharp-spoken critic. When Parnell asked his colleagues

Street, Waterford in 1886. He was educated at Mount Sion Christian Brothers (Congregation of Christian Brothers) School and later in Thurles, County Tipperary, where his father was the postmaster. One of his grandmothers was a Quaker who was disowned by her wealthy family for marrying a Roman Catholic. He joined the Post Office (engineering dept) in 1902 and worked in Thurles, Bantry, Wexford and Dublin. Mulcahy joined the Irish Volunteers at the time


poem

." An English translation by Kaarina Hollo of the same poem won the 2012 Times Stephen Spender Prize for poetry translation, a competition open to poems in all languages and from all periods of history. *John Sullivan (John Sullivan (Irish sailor)), recipient of the Victoria Cross *Graham Canty, current Cork Football captain is from Bantry and plays for Bantry Blues along with rugby

. A substantial minority of the Irish people never forgave him for this role during the divorce crisis, permanently damaging his own standing in Irish public life. The rift prompted a nine-year old Dublin schoolboy, James Joyce, to pen a poem called ''Et Tu, Healy?''. thumb right 125px Plaque on Bantry (Image:Iarthair Chorcaí 081.jpg)'s Wolfe Tone Square commemorating Tim Healy's birth. DATE OF BIRTH 17 May 1855 PLACE OF BIRTH Bantry, County Cork DATE OF DEATH


large international

, though the nearest large international airport is Cork Airport. Cork Airport may be accessed by direct Bus Eireann bus in the summer tourist season; at other times of year, it is necessary to change buses in Cork (Cork (city)). Scheduled bus services connect the town with Cork, Killarney, Castletownbere, and some smaller local centres. Bantry Town railway station, the western terminus of the Cork, Bandon and South Coast Railway, opened on 22 October 1892, but finally closed on 1 April 1961.


featuring fine

-lodge.com genealogy.htm information , local history, operated by the Bantry Historical Society - - Bantry House 125px (File:Bantry House.jpg) Bantry Cork (County Cork) Munster South-West (List of regions of the Republic of Ireland) Historic house 18th century mansion featuring fine furnishings and decorations, gardens - Impact of agriculture thumb Rolling green pastures near Bantry (File:Pasture at the Viewpoint - geograph.org.uk - 15065.jpg), County Cork. The long history of agricultural production, coupled with modern intensive agricultural methods such as pesticide and fertiliser use and runoff from contaminants into streams, rivers and lakes, impact the natural fresh-water ecosystems and have placed pressure on biodiversity in Ireland.


business quot

and the town, and this industry has enjoyed considerable success. An injection of money by the Irish Government in the early 1990s led to the part of the terminal being restored. The Government arranged for oil to be stored here during the First Gulf War in case of a disruption to oil supplies. Further funding led to more and more of the terminal being made operational. By 1998 it was deemed officially "open for business" once more. It passed from

Bantry

'''Bantry''' ( to the west. The Beara peninsula is to the northwest, with Sheep's Head also nearby, on the peninsula south of Bantry Bay.

As with many areas on Ireland's south-west coast, Bantry claims an ancient connection to the sixth-century saint Breandán (Naomh Bréanainn) the Navigator (Brendan). In Irish lore, Saint Breandán was the first person to discover America.

The focus of the town is a large square, formed partly by infilling of the shallow inner harbour. In former times, this accommodated regular cattle fairs; after modernising as an urban plaza, it now features a colourful weekly market and occasional public functions.

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