Bansha

What is Bansha known for?


ireland

settlement_type Town image_skyline image_caption pushpin_map Ireland pushpin_label_position right pushpin_map_caption Location in Ireland coordinates_display inline,title coordinates_region IE subdivision_type Country subdivision_name Ireland (Republic of Ireland) subdivision_type1

Province (Provinces of Ireland) subdivision_name1 Munster subdivision_type3 County (Counties of Ireland) subdivision_name3 County Tipperary established_title established_date unit_pref Metric area_footnotes area_total_km2 population_as_of 2002 population_footnotes population_total population_urban 300 population_rural 1200 population_density_km2 auto

?????? -- website footnotes '''Bansha''' ( ) is a village in County Tipperary in Ireland (Republic of Ireland). The village is part of the parish of "Bansha and Kilmoyler" (united in 1858) in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly. It is in the historical barony (Barony (Ireland)) of Clanwilliam (Clanwilliam, barony, Tipperary). Bansha is co-extensive with the pre


famous battle

were often controversial as he was sympathetic to the natives in many of the outposts of Empire in which he served. His wife, the famous battle artist, Elizabeth Thompson (1846–1933), known as Lady Butler, continued to live at the Castle until 1922 when she went to live at Gormanston Castle, County Meath with their youngest daughter, Eileen, who became Viscountess Gormanston (1883–1964) in 1911 on her marriage to Jenico Preston, 15th Viscount Gormanston (1878–1925), the Premier


famous

Village Mill (watermill). Further expansion took place in the early 21st century when "Master Horgan's Field" adjacent to the northern boundary of the old graveyard was developed as a modern residential quarter. In earlier decades, the site was owned by Mr. Peter Horgan, a native of Kilmichael, County Cork, a place which won fame as the site of the famous ambush of the same name which took place there during the War of Independence, a fact of which the old master was very proud

of the United Kingdom Westminster from 1900 until he was defeated at the famous election of 1918 when Sinn Féin ousted the Irish Parliamentary Party in most constituencies. Michael Ferris was a Teachta Dála in Dáil Éireann from 1989 until his death on parliamentary business in Lisbon on March 20, 2000 at the age of 69. Overall, he had over twenty years service in the Oireachtas (parliament), having been elected to Seanad Éireann for the first time on April 23, 1975

in the 1940s and 1950s and their son John was an artist and man of letters who wrote a famous memoir of bohemian Dublin in the 1950s—''Remembering How we Stood''. Darby Ryan, poet and patriot Diarmuid O'Ríain (Darby Ryan) was born at Ashgrove, Bansha in 1777 and was a poet and patriot, his most famous composition was undoubtedly ''The Peeler and the Goat'', a ballad or satire which was popularly sung across Ireland and was taken worldwide by emigrants. Copies of his ''Tipperary


view quot'

station had a strategic importance for about a century as it was the commercial artery connecting the village to both the station and the creamery which was the centre of activity each morning as trains arrived on one side of the road and busy creamery activity on the other side gave a vibrancy that has now been lost with the closure of both. The village expanded towards the end of the 20th century when the "Galtee View" residential area was developed in the Glebe close to the old


depicting

Minstrelsy'' are to be found in The British Museum and at The Royal Irish Academy. Ryan died in 1855 and is buried in the old graveyard in Bansha where his grave is marked, unusually, by a carved stone cross depicting a rope and anchor, suggestive of a maritime connection of which there was none. Sir William and Lady Butler Lieutenant-General Sir William Francis Butler PC, GCB (October 31, 1838 – June 7, 1910), a soldier, a writer, and an adventurer, lived

Viscount of Ireland. Lady Butler died in 1933 in her 87th year and is buried at Stamullen graveyard in County Meath, just up the road from Gormanston. Among her many famous paintings is ''The Roll Call'' depicting a scene in the Crimean War. This painting was bought by Queen Victoria and forms part of the royal collection and is now in Buckingham Palace. Her daughter Eileen suffered great loss during the second World War when two of her three sons, William (16th Lord Gormanston


industry location

-Reformation (English Reformation) parish of Templeneiry of which the townland name of Templenahurney is thought to be a corruption. While the village is the focal point of the area, there is also an outlying hamlet in the parish, located at Rossadrehid where a rural creamery once serviced the dairy industry. Location Bansha is located on the National Primary Route (N24 (N24 road (Ireland))) linking the cities of Limerick and Waterford and is eight kilometres south-east of Tipperary Town and thirteen kilometres north-west of Cahir. The village is strategically located on the eastern approaches to the Glen of Aherlow, which forms a large part of the parish as do the Galtee Mountains (spelt Galty Mountains on Ordnance Survey maps), which has the highest inland mountain peak in Ireland, Galtymore (917 metres, or 3,009 ft). The Roman Catholic Parish Church of the Annunciation, built in 1807, is centrally located in the village as is the Church of Ireland, for the parish of Templeneiry, known to be in use from 1718 but now closed as unviable because of a dwindling local congregation. However, the building which has an imposing spire, erected in 1814, is used for community purposes and the surrounding graveyard is still used for burials by the old families of the area. The River Ara flows by the village and the railway line from Limerick to Waterford also passes through, though the railway station which opened on 1 May 1852, was closed on 9 September 1963 '''Kilmoyler''' is a townland in the civil parish of Killardry in the barony (Barony (Ireland)) of Clanwilliam (Clanwilliam, barony, Tipperary), South Tipperary in Ireland (Republic of Ireland). It is part of the parish of '''Bansha and Kilmoyler''' in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly. The Galtee Mountains and River Suir dominate the landscape here. It is located approximately halfway between the towns of Cahir and Bansha on the River Suir and is more closely associated with Bansha through its ecclesiastical and sporting ties, the parish being united with Bansha in 1858 and in a sporting context, the community is an integral part of the Galtee Rovers GAA Club which has its club grounds and clubhouse in Bansha village. The land is very fertile and agriculture predominates with dairying as the main occupation.


agricultural show

at the junction of the glen road leading to the Glen of Aherlow. A member of the 'Coolavunga' branch of the family - James McCarthy Reagh, wrote a poem entitled "The Haunted Village", which is sometimes recited on social occasions by the older people of the village. Contemporary scene There is a vibrant contemporary scene in Bansha which is experiencing an unprecedented increase in population due to new housing developments. The Bansha Agricultural Show is held annually and in recent


time ist

timezone1 WET (Western European Time) utc_offset1 +0 timezone1_DST IST (Irish Standard Time) (WEST (Western European Summer Time)) utc_offset1_DST -1 latd 52 latm 27 latNS N longd 8 longm 04 longEW W coordinates_type dim:100000_region:IE elevation_footnotes elevation_m 68 blank_name Irish Grid Reference (Irish grid reference system) blank_info !--


history amp

; Thomas G. McGrath (1985) - ''Tipperary History & Society'' *Thomas Campbell (Thomas Campbell (writer)) (London) (1777) - ''A Philosophical Survey of the South of Ireland. *Renagh Holohan & Jeremy Williams (1989) - ''The Irish Chateau, In search of Descendants of the Wild Geese. *Denis G. Marnane (1985) - ''A History of West Tipperary from 1660 - Land and Violence'' *Senan Molony (2000) - ''The Irish aboard Titanic'' *Randal McDonnell (2002) - '' The Lost Houses of Ireland, A chronicle


football matches

and football matches relayed from Croke Park on Radio Eireann. The building endured until the 1960s when because of dilapidation, it was eventually closed, after which the Parochial Hall became the sole entertainment centre for the village and surrounding area. Muintir na Tíre Bansha came to national prominence when Rev. John Canon Hayes (Canon John Hayes), founder of Muintir na Tíre was appointed parish priest of Bansha & Kilmoyler in 1946. Due largely to his endeavours

Bansha

'''Bansha''' ( ) is a village in County Tipperary in Ireland (Republic of Ireland). The village is part of the parish of "Bansha and Kilmoyler" (united in 1858) in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly. It is in the historical barony (Barony (Ireland)) of Clanwilliam (Clanwilliam, barony, Tipperary). Bansha is co-extensive with the pre-Reformation (English Reformation) parish of Templeneiry of which the townland name of Templenahurney is thought to be a corruption. While the village is the focal point of the area, there is also an outlying hamlet in the parish, located at Rossadrehid where a rural creamery once serviced the dairy industry.

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