Baddeck, Nova Scotia

What is Baddeck, Nova Scotia known for?


ability

substantial HD-4, powered by Renault engines. A top speed of was achieved, with the hydrofoil exhibiting rapid acceleration, good stability and steering along with the ability to take waves without difficulty. Boileau 2004, pp. 28–30. In 1913, Dr. Bell hired Walter Pinaud, a Sydney yacht designer and builder as well as the proprietor of Pinaud's Yacht Yard in Westmount, Nova Scotia to work on the pontoons of the HD-4. Pinaud soon took over

Boileau 2004, p. 30. a record which stood for ten years. * The Alexander Graham Bell Memorial Park, which features a broad neoclassical monument built in 1917 by public subscription. The monument graphically depicts mankind's ability to span the globe through telecommunications;


original silver

d'Or Lake , on 23 February 1909, making it the first controlled powered flight in Canada. The aircraft was piloted by one of its designers, John McCurdy (John Alexander Douglas McCurdy). The original ''Silver Dart'' was designed and built by the Aerial Experiment Association (AEA), formed under the guidance of Dr. Alexander Graham Bell. From 1891, Bell had begun experiments at Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) and Hammondsport (Hammondsport, New York) to develop motor-powered heavier-than-air aircraft. By 1908, the success of the AEA was seen in a series of ground-breaking designs, culminating in the ''Silver Dart''.By the time the ''Silver Dart'' was constructed in late 1908, it was the Aerial Experiment Association's fourth flying machine. One of its precursors, the ''June Bug'' (AEA June Bug), had already broken records. It won the ''Scientific American'' Trophy for making the first official one mile flight in North America. Weymouth (Weymouth, Nova Scotia) group7 Lists


quot science

was conceived by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1801, and named in honor of Alessandro Volta, with Bell receiving the third grand prize in its history. Crosland, Maurice P. ''"Science Under Control: The French Academy of Sciences, 1795–1914"'', Cambridge University Press, 1992. As cited by James Love in KEI Issues Report on Selected Innovation Prizes and Reward Programs: The Volta Prize For Electricity, March 20, 2008, p. 16. Retrieved


local music

) for the invention of the telephone from the Académie française, representing the French government. Among the luminaries who judged were Victor Hugo and Alexandre Dumas (Alexandre Dumas, fils). The Volta Prize was conceived by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1801, and named in honor of Alessandro Volta, with Bell receiving the third grand prize in its history. Crosland, Maurice P. ''"Science Under Control: The French Academy of Sciences, 1795–1914"'', Cambridge University Press, 1992. As cited by James Love in KEI Issues Report on Selected Innovation Prizes and Reward Programs: The Volta Prize For Electricity, March 20, 2008, p. 16. Retrieved ''Knowledge Ecology International website'', January 5, 2010. Davis. John L. Artisans and savants: The Role of the Academy of Sciences in the Process of Electrical Innovation in France, 1850–1880, Annals of Science, Volume 55, Issue 3, July 1998, p. 301. Retrieved" ''InformaWorld.com,'' January 5, 2010. "Honors to Professor Bell.", ''Boston Daily Evening Traveller'', September 1, 1880, Library of Congress, Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved April 5, 2009. "Volta Prize of the French Academy Awarded to Prof. Alexander Graham Bell, September 1, 1880." ''Library of Congress'', Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved April 5, 2009. "Telegram from Grossman to Alexander Graham Bell, August 2, 1880." ''Library of Congress'', Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved April 5, 2009. "Telegram from Alexander Graham Bell to Count du Moncel, 1880." ''Library of Congress'', Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved April 5, 2009. "Letter from Frederick T. Frelinghuysen to Alexander Graham Bell, January 7, 1882." ''Library of Congress'', Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved April 5, 2009. Since Bell was becoming increasingly affluent, he used his prize money to create endowment funds (the 'Volta Fund') and institutions in and around the United States capital of Washington, D.C.. These included the prestigious'' 'Volta Laboratory Association' ''(1880), also known as the'' Volta Laboratory (Volta Laboratory and Bureau) ''and as the'' 'Alexander Graham Bell Laboratory', ''and which eventually led to the Volta Bureau (1887) as a center for studies on deafness which is still in operation in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. The Volta Laboratory became an experimental facility devoted to scientific discovery, and the very next year invented a wax phonograph cylinder that was later used by Thomas Edison; "Letter from Mabel Hubbard Bell, February 27, 1880." ''Library of Congress'', Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved April 5, 2009. N.B.: last line of the typed note refers to the future disposition of award funds:'' "... and thus the matter lay till the paper turned up. He intends putting the full amount into his Laboratory and Library";'' The laboratory was also the site where he and his associate invented his'' 'proudest achievement','' the Photophone, the ''optical telephone'' which presaged fibre optical telecommunications (Fiber-optic communication), while the Volta Bureau would later evolve into the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (the AG Bell), a leading center for the research and pedagogy of deafness. Following his successful invention of the telephone and being relatively wealthy, Bell acquired land near Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) in 1885, largely due to surroundings reminiscent of his early years in Scotland. He established a summer estate complete with research laboratories, working with deaf people—including Helen Keller—and continued to invent. Baddeck would be the site of his experiments with hydrofoil technologies as well as the Aerial Experiment Association, financed by his wife, which saw the first powered flight in the British Empire when the AEA ''Silver Dart'' (AEA Silver Dart) took off from the ice-covered waters of Bras d'Or Lake. Bell also built the forerunner to the iron lung and he experimented with breeding sheep. A March 1906 Scientific American article by American hydrofoil pioneer William E. Meacham explained the basic principle of hydrofoils. Alexander Graham Bell considered the invention of the hydroplane a very significant achievement, and after reading the article began to sketch concepts of what is now called a hydrofoil boat. With his chief engineer Casey Baldwin (Frederick W. Baldwin), Bell began hydrofoil experiments in the summer of 1908. Baldwin studied the work of the Italian inventor Enrico Forlanini and began testing models based on his designs, which led them to the development of hydrofoil watercraft. During Bell's world tour of 1910–1911, Bell and Baldwin met with Forlanini in Italy, where they rode in his hydrofoil boat over Lake Maggiore. Baldwin described it as being as smooth as flying. On returning to Bell's large laboratory at his Beinn Bhreagh (Beinn Bhreagh, Nova Scotia) estate near Baddeck, Nova Scotia, they experimented with a number of designs, culminating in Bell's ''HD-4''. Using Renault engines, a top speed of 87 km h (54 mph) was achieved, accelerating rapidly, taking waves without difficulty, steering well and showing good stability. Bell's report to the United States Navy permitted him to obtain two 260 kW (350 horsepower) engines. On September 9, 1919 the HD-4 set a world marine speed record of 114 km h (70.86 mph), a record which stood for two decades. A full-scale replica of Bell's HD-4 is viewable at the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site (Alexander_Graham_Bell#Legacy_and_honors) museum in Baddeck, Nova Scotia. thumb right 250px The "Largest Ceilidh Fiddle in the World". Located at the Sydney waterfront. (Image:Sydney Fiddle.JPG) In recent decades, Cape Breton Island has become home to a significant tourism industry, with Sydney (as the island's largest urban centre) being a prime beneficiary. Until the early 2000s when its economy was tied to the steel industry, Sydney had been overlooked as a tourist destination, with the more centrally located scenic village of Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) being a preferred location for tourists transiting the Cabot Trail, however Sydney has recently witnessed a revival as a result of significant government investment in cruise ship facilities and a waterfront revitalization plan which has seen a boardwalk and marinas constructed, and the world's largest fiddle. This funding is part of the post-industrial adjustment package offered by the federal and provincial governments. Sydney's tourism draw is increasingly linked to its cultural asset as being the urban heart of Cape Breton Island. Its population is a diverse mixture of nationalities which contributes to various Scottish, Acadian, African Canadian and eastern European cultural events being held throughout the year. Sydney's accommodation sector is centrally located to attractions in Louisbourg (Louisbourg, Nova Scotia) (home of the Fortress of Louisbourg), Glace Bay (Glace Bay, Nova Scotia) (home of the Glace Bay Miners Museum), Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) (home of the Alexander Graham Bell Museum), as well as popular touring destinations such as the Cabot Trail, Cape Breton Highlands National Park, and Bras d'Or Lake. Construction of Highway 105 (Nova Scotia Highway 105) (the Trans-Canada Highway) between North Sydney (North Sydney, Nova Scotia) and the Canso Causeway in the 1960s resulted in the re-routing of most Cabot Trail tourism traffic. The Cabot Trail is now advertised with its start and end-point in Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia), bypassing the traditional western approach to the Cabot Trail through


quot place

to some historians the name Baddeck is derived from the Mi'kmaq (Mi'kmaq language) term "Abadak" which has been translated as "place with an island near" (in reference to Kidston Island, immediately offshore). Weymouth (Weymouth, Nova Scotia) group7 Lists


work education

a museum showcasing his work. Education Baddeck Academy is a Primary to grade 12 school serving Baddeck and the surrounding communities. It is governed by the Cape Breton – Victoria Regional School Board. The Gaelic College of Celtic Arts and Crafts is located approximately 20 km outside of Baddeck in St. Anns (St. Anns, Nova Scotia). The college teaches traditional Celtic (Celts) arts including dance, music and Gaelic language (Goidelic languages). Notable


scientific discovery

Laboratory Association' ''(1880), also known as the'' Volta Laboratory (Volta Laboratory and Bureau) ''and as the'' 'Alexander Graham Bell Laboratory', ''and which eventually led to the Volta Bureau (1887) as a center for studies on deafness which is still in operation in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. The Volta Laboratory became an experimental facility devoted to scientific discovery, and the very next year invented a wax phonograph cylinder that was later used by Thomas Edison; "Letter from Mabel Hubbard Bell, February 27, 1880." ''Library of Congress'', Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers. Retrieved April 5, 2009. N.B.: last line of the typed note refers to the future disposition of award funds:'' "... and thus the matter lay till the paper turned up. He intends putting the full amount into his Laboratory and Library";'' The laboratory was also the site where he and his associate invented his'' 'proudest achievement','' the Photophone, the ''optical telephone'' which presaged fibre optical telecommunications (Fiber-optic communication), while the Volta Bureau would later evolve into the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (the AG Bell), a leading center for the research and pedagogy of deafness. Following his successful invention of the telephone and being relatively wealthy, Bell acquired land near Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) in 1885, largely due to surroundings reminiscent of his early years in Scotland. He established a summer estate complete with research laboratories, working with deaf people—including Helen Keller—and continued to invent. Baddeck would be the site of his experiments with hydrofoil technologies as well as the Aerial Experiment Association, financed by his wife, which saw the first powered flight in the British Empire when the AEA ''Silver Dart'' (AEA Silver Dart) took off from the ice-covered waters of Bras d'Or Lake. Bell also built the forerunner to the iron lung and he experimented with breeding sheep. A March 1906 Scientific American article by American hydrofoil pioneer William E. Meacham explained the basic principle of hydrofoils. Alexander Graham Bell considered the invention of the hydroplane a very significant achievement, and after reading the article began to sketch concepts of what is now called a hydrofoil boat. With his chief engineer Casey Baldwin (Frederick W. Baldwin), Bell began hydrofoil experiments in the summer of 1908. Baldwin studied the work of the Italian inventor Enrico Forlanini and began testing models based on his designs, which led them to the development of hydrofoil watercraft. During Bell's world tour of 1910–1911, Bell and Baldwin met with Forlanini in Italy, where they rode in his hydrofoil boat over Lake Maggiore. Baldwin described it as being as smooth as flying. On returning to Bell's large laboratory at his Beinn Bhreagh (Beinn Bhreagh, Nova Scotia) estate near Baddeck, Nova Scotia, they experimented with a number of designs, culminating in Bell's ''HD-4''. Using Renault engines, a top speed of 87 km h (54 mph) was achieved, accelerating rapidly, taking waves without difficulty, steering well and showing good stability. Bell's report to the United States Navy permitted him to obtain two 260 kW (350 horsepower) engines. On September 9, 1919 the HD-4 set a world marine speed record of 114 km h (70.86 mph), a record which stood for two decades. A full-scale replica of Bell's HD-4 is viewable at the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site (Alexander_Graham_Bell#Legacy_and_honors) museum in Baddeck, Nova Scotia. thumb right 250px The "Largest Ceilidh Fiddle in the World". Located at the Sydney waterfront. (Image:Sydney Fiddle.JPG) In recent decades, Cape Breton Island has become home to a significant tourism industry, with Sydney (as the island's largest urban centre) being a prime beneficiary. Until the early 2000s when its economy was tied to the steel industry, Sydney had been overlooked as a tourist destination, with the more centrally located scenic village of Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) being a preferred location for tourists transiting the Cabot Trail, however Sydney has recently witnessed a revival as a result of significant government investment in cruise ship facilities and a waterfront revitalization plan which has seen a boardwalk and marinas constructed, and the world's largest fiddle. This funding is part of the post-industrial adjustment package offered by the federal and provincial governments. Sydney's tourism draw is increasingly linked to its cultural asset as being the urban heart of Cape Breton Island. Its population is a diverse mixture of nationalities which contributes to various Scottish, Acadian, African Canadian and eastern European cultural events being held throughout the year. Sydney's accommodation sector is centrally located to attractions in Louisbourg (Louisbourg, Nova Scotia) (home of the Fortress of Louisbourg), Glace Bay (Glace Bay, Nova Scotia) (home of the Glace Bay Miners Museum), Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) (home of the Alexander Graham Bell Museum), as well as popular touring destinations such as the Cabot Trail, Cape Breton Highlands National Park, and Bras d'Or Lake. Construction of Highway 105 (Nova Scotia Highway 105) (the Trans-Canada Highway) between North Sydney (North Sydney, Nova Scotia) and the Canso Causeway in the 1960s resulted in the re-routing of most Cabot Trail tourism traffic. The Cabot Trail is now advertised with its start and end-point in Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia), bypassing the traditional western approach to the Cabot Trail through Judique (Judique, Nova Scotia), Port Hood, Inverness (Inverness, Nova Scotia) and Margaree Harbour (Margaree Harbour, Nova Scotia), and thus decreasing tourism traffic on the Ceilidh Trail. thumb Sunrise Valley, Cape North, Nova Scotia Cape North (File:CabotTrail in 2010.JPG) in 2010 *Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia), the gateway to the Cabot Trail and the location of the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site *St. Ann's (St. Ann's, Nova Scotia), home of the world famous Gaelic College of Celtic Arts and Crafts thumb left Canada's first aircraft, the AEA Silver Dart (Image:AEA Silver Dart.jpg) The aviation age came to Canada on 23 February 1909, when Alexander Graham Bell's (Alexander Graham Bell) ''Silver Dart (AEA Silver Dart)'' took off from the ice of Bras d'Or Lake at Baddeck, Nova Scotia with J.D. McCurdy (John Alexander Douglas McCurdy) at the controls. This 1 2-mile flight was the first "controlled powered flight" (also the first flight of a "heavier than air craft") in Canada and the British Empire. Roberts 1959, p. 3. A longer flight of 20 miles was flown at Bras d'Or Lake on 10 March 1909. Roberts 1959, p. 5. The '''''Silver Dart''''' (or '''''Aerodrome #4''''') was a derivative of an early aircraft built by a Canadian U.S. team, which after many successful flights in Hammondsport, New York, earlier in 1909, was dismantled and shipped to Baddeck, Nova Scotia. It was flown off the ice of Baddeck Bay, a sub-basin of Bras d'Or Lake, on 23 February 1909, making it the first controlled powered flight in Canada. The aircraft was piloted by one of its designers, John McCurdy (John Alexander Douglas McCurdy). The original ''Silver Dart'' was designed and built by the Aerial Experiment Association (AEA), formed under the guidance of Dr. Alexander Graham Bell. From 1891, Bell had begun experiments at Baddeck (Baddeck, Nova Scotia) and Hammondsport (Hammondsport, New York) to develop motor-powered heavier-than-air aircraft. By 1908, the success of the AEA was seen in a series of ground-breaking designs, culminating in the ''Silver Dart''.By the time the ''Silver Dart'' was constructed in late 1908, it was the Aerial Experiment Association's fourth flying machine. One of its precursors, the ''June Bug'' (AEA June Bug), had already broken records. It won the ''Scientific American'' Trophy for making the first official one mile flight in North America. Weymouth (Weymouth, Nova Scotia) group7 Lists


events quot

showcased musicians like Gordie Sampson in the past. http: www.sonicbids.com 2 EPK ?epk_id 23255#calendar Events Baddeck is one of several Cape Breton communities that plays host to the Celtic Colours festival each fall. The music festival features hundreds of Celtic musicians from Cape Breton and around the world. http: www.visitbaddeck.com events.html In the spring, the village hosts the Cabot Trail Relay Race


speed record

in 1908. Baddeck was home to Alexander Graham Bell and was witness to the first flight in the commonwealth by Bell's Silver Dart (AEA Silver Dart) in 1909. Historic dates * 1851 - Established as shire town of Victoria County * 1908 - Village is incorporated * 23 February 1909 - The first flight in the Commonwealth as the Silver Dart takes off from the frozen Baddeck Bay * 9 September 1919 - The HD-4 sets a world marine speed record of 114 km h (70.86 mph

the boatyard at Bell Laboratories on Beinn Bhreagh, Bell's estate near Baddeck, Nova Scotia. Pinaud's experience in boat-building enabled him to make useful design changes to the HD-4. After the First World War, work began again on the HD-4. Bell's report to the U.S. Navy (United States Navy) permitted him to obtain two 350 horsepower (260 kW) engines in July 1919. On September 9, 1919, the HD-4 set a world marine speed record of 70.86 miles per hour (114.04 km h), ref

. On September 9, 1919 the HD-4 set a world marine speed record of 114 km h (70.86 mph), a record which stood for two decades. A full-scale replica of Bell's HD-4 is viewable at the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site (Alexander_Graham_Bell#Legacy_and_honors) museum in Baddeck, Nova Scotia. thumb right 250px The "Largest Ceilidh Fiddle in the World". Located at the Sydney waterfront. (Image:Sydney Fiddle.JPG) In recent decades, Cape Breton Island has


early years

Weymouth (Weymouth, Nova Scotia) group7 Lists

Baddeck, Nova Scotia

'''Baddeck''' ( ; 2011 population: 769) is a Canadian (Canada) village (General Service Area) in Victoria County, Nova Scotia.

It is the county's shire town and is situated on the northern shore of Bras d'Or Lake on Cape Breton Island. According to some historians the name Baddeck is derived from the Mi'kmaq (Mi'kmaq language) term "Abadak" which has been translated as "place with an island near" (in reference to Kidston Island, immediately offshore). url https: gis8.nsgc.gov.ns.ca scripts esrimap.dll?name nsplacenames&cmd 4&zoomcons 1&action zoomToPlace&objid 1038&prov false title Nova Scotia Geographical Names Database entry for "Baddeck" (includes map) publisher Government of Nova Scotia accessdate October 8, 2013 url http: archive.org stream placenamesofprov00browrich#page 14 mode 2up title Place-names of the province of Nova Scotia (1922), by Thomas J Brown publisher Royal Print & Litho., Halifax, N.S. accessdate October 8, 2013

Today, Baddeck functions as a service centre for the sparsely populated county and hosts a well-equipped volunteer fire department, a consolidated school serving grades Primary-12, as well as a public library, provincial government offices, a hospital, the Bras d'Or Yacht Club, a branch of the Royal Canadian Legion and a nursing home.

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