Bács-Bodrog County

What is Bács-Bodrog County known for?


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of the SFR Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia), ruled by the Communists (League of Communists of Croatia), but enjoying a degree of autonomy within the federation. The autonomy effectively increased through the 1974 Yugoslav Constitution, basically fulfilling a goal of the Croatian Spring movement, and providing a legal basis for independence of the federative constituents.


century

, ) was the administrative county (comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary))) of the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary from the 18th century to 1918. Its territory is currently in northern Serbia (western Vojvodina) and southern Hungary. The capital of the county was Zombor (Sombor) (Serbian: ''Sombor''). Name The county was named after two older counties: Bács (Serbian: Bač) and Bodrog (Serbian: Bodrog

was 10,362 km² around 1910. History Bács county arose as one of the first comitatus of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, in the 11th century. Bodrog county was also formed in the 11th century. http: lazarus.elte.hu ~mihalyi proba Hungary%201038%20domb.jpg The area was taken by the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century http: lazarus.elte.hu ~mihalyi proba Hungary%201568%20domb.jpg and two


low population

was restored after 1944 and the county was abolished again. Yugoslav part of former Bács-Bodrog county was later divided into 3 districts and currently is part of Serbia, autonomous region of Vojvodina. Demographics thumb 250px Ethnic map and political division of the area in 1715 (Image:Backa ethnic map 1715.png) During the 18th century, the Habsburgs carried out an intensive colonisation of the area, which had low population density after the last Ottoman


wearing blue

. Between 1849 and 1872, it was again part of the Military Frontier, and after 1872, it came under civil administration as a part of the Bács-Bodrog County within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary (part of Austria-Hungary). *Bačka. The coat of arms of Bačka was granted by Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor (1657-1705) in 1699. It was later (1861) retained for the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In blue field on a green grass stands Saint Paul (Paul of Tarsus) wearing blue shirt and brown toga with golden nimbus holding in dexter a downpointed silver sword with golden hilt and in sinister a black book (Bible). The Bačka-Bodrog county was divided between Yugoslavia and Hungary after World War I. The northern part of it was later incorporated into Bács-Kiskun county of Hungary, that also uses the coat of arms with St. Peter in its dexter half. thumb left Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran (File:Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran, Vojvodina, Serbia.jpg) According to archeology, there was human settlement in the territory of present-day Srbobran in the prehistoric times. The first written record about the settlement is from 1338, in which the Srbobran is mentioned under name ''Sentomas'', which means Saint Thomas (Thomas (Apostle)), i.e. the apostle Thomas, who was the patron saint of a monastery and of the village around it in the Middle Ages. During this time, the area was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bacsensis County (Bács-Bodrog County). This village, together with the monastery, became destroyed during the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) conquest in the 16th century. Its former population left the region and fled towards North to Habsburg Royal Hungary. During the Ottoman administration, the settlement of Sentomaš was rebuilt and was populated by ethnic Serbs. It was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. After the Bačka region was captured by Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) troops led by Prince Eugene of Savoy in the end of the 17th century, a settlement was included into Habsburg Monarchy and was populated by new colonists, mainly by ethnic Serbs from the South, but also (since the second half of the 18th century) by ethnic Hungarians from the North, who became the second largest ethnic group in the settlement (after Serbs). The settlement was part of the Military Frontier until 1751, when it came under the civil administration. A document from 1751 indicates that besides name ''Sentomaš'', the name ''Srbograd'' (Serb Town) was also used as a non-official denomination for the town. The development of the town was fast; in 1787 its population was 3,532, while in 1836 this number rose to 11,321. From 1751, the town was part of the Theiss District (District of Potisje) within the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) and the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). History Tovariševo is one of the old Serb (Serbs) communities of Vojvodina, first mentioned in 1543, during Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) administration. It administratively was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. In the end of the 17th century, the village was abandoned, but was repopulated in the beginning of the 18th century, during Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) administration. A description from the end of the 18th century (by András Vályi) states that ''"Tovarisova is a Rac (Raci (ethnonym))'' (Serb (Serbs)) ''village in Bács county (Bács-Bodrog County). The landowner is the Royal Hungarian Chamber and the population follows the old faith'' (i.e. Orthodox (Serbian Orthodoxy)). ''The black soil gives wheat, barley and oats, the village has an oak forest and a bad vineyard; it hasn't any water, but after the long autumn rains the soil became sodden; it lacks reed but it has silk-beetles. The nearest market-town is Újvidék ''(Novi Sad)'', where people can earn money from the sale of cattle."'' Until 1848, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of autonomous Serbian Vojvodina, while from 1849 to 1860, it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, which was a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship, in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). birth_date November 11, 1855 birth_place Zenta (Senta) (Serbian: Senta), Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County), Kingdom of Hungary, Austrian Empire death_date August 13, 1906 History The village was firstly mentioned in 1457. In this time it was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bács (Bács-Bodrog County) (Bač) county. In the 16th-17th century, it was under administration of the Ottoman Empire and was part of the Sanjak of Segedin, firstly within the Budin Eyalet (Budin Province, Ottoman Empire) and later within the Egir Eyalet. During this time it was populated by ethnic Serbs. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language.


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shirt and brown toga with golden nimbus holding in dexter a downpointed silver sword with golden hilt and in sinister a black book (Bible). The Bačka-Bodrog county was divided between Yugoslavia and Hungary after World War I. The northern part of it was later incorporated into Bács-Kiskun county of Hungary, that also uses the coat of arms with St. Peter in its dexter half. File:Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran, Vojvodina, Serbia.jpg thumb left Oil drilling facilities


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. Between 1849 and 1872, it was again part of the Military Frontier, and after 1872, it came under civil administration as a part of the Bács-Bodrog County within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary (part of Austria-Hungary). *Bačka. The coat of arms of Bačka was granted by Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor (1657-1705) in 1699. It was later (1861) retained for the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In blue field on a green grass stands Saint Paul (Paul of Tarsus) wearing blue shirt and brown toga with golden nimbus holding in dexter a downpointed silver sword with golden hilt and in sinister a black book (Bible). The Bačka-Bodrog county was divided between Yugoslavia and Hungary after World War I. The northern part of it was later incorporated into Bács-Kiskun county of Hungary, that also uses the coat of arms with St. Peter in its dexter half. thumb left Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran (File:Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran, Vojvodina, Serbia.jpg) According to archeology, there was human settlement in the territory of present-day Srbobran in the prehistoric times. The first written record about the settlement is from 1338, in which the Srbobran is mentioned under name ''Sentomas'', which means Saint Thomas (Thomas (Apostle)), i.e. the apostle Thomas, who was the patron saint of a monastery and of the village around it in the Middle Ages. During this time, the area was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bacsensis County (Bács-Bodrog County). This village, together with the monastery, became destroyed during the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) conquest in the 16th century. Its former population left the region and fled towards North to Habsburg Royal Hungary. During the Ottoman administration, the settlement of Sentomaš was rebuilt and was populated by ethnic Serbs. It was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. After the Bačka region was captured by Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) troops led by Prince Eugene of Savoy in the end of the 17th century, a settlement was included into Habsburg Monarchy and was populated by new colonists, mainly by ethnic Serbs from the South, but also (since the second half of the 18th century) by ethnic Hungarians from the North, who became the second largest ethnic group in the settlement (after Serbs). The settlement was part of the Military Frontier until 1751, when it came under the civil administration. A document from 1751 indicates that besides name ''Sentomaš'', the name ''Srbograd'' (Serb Town) was also used as a non-official denomination for the town. The development of the town was fast; in 1787 its population was 3,532, while in 1836 this number rose to 11,321. From 1751, the town was part of the Theiss District (District of Potisje) within the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) and the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). History Tovariševo is one of the old Serb (Serbs) communities of Vojvodina, first mentioned in 1543, during Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) administration. It administratively was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. In the end of the 17th century, the village was abandoned, but was repopulated in the beginning of the 18th century, during Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) administration. A description from the end of the 18th century (by András Vályi) states that ''"Tovarisova is a Rac (Raci (ethnonym))'' (Serb (Serbs)) ''village in Bács county (Bács-Bodrog County). The landowner is the Royal Hungarian Chamber and the population follows the old faith'' (i.e. Orthodox (Serbian Orthodoxy)). ''The black soil gives wheat, barley and oats, the village has an oak forest and a bad vineyard; it hasn't any water, but after the long autumn rains the soil became sodden; it lacks reed but it has silk-beetles. The nearest market-town is Újvidék ''(Novi Sad)'', where people can earn money from the sale of cattle."'' Until 1848, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of autonomous Serbian Vojvodina, while from 1849 to 1860, it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, which was a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship, in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). birth_date November 11, 1855 birth_place Zenta (Senta) (Serbian: Senta), Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County), Kingdom of Hungary, Austrian Empire death_date August 13, 1906 History The village was firstly mentioned in 1457. In this time it was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bács (Bács-Bodrog County) (Bač) county. In the 16th-17th century, it was under administration of the Ottoman Empire and was part of the Sanjak of Segedin, firstly within the Budin Eyalet (Budin Province, Ottoman Empire) and later within the Egir Eyalet. During this time it was populated by ethnic Serbs. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language.


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of the SFR Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia), ruled by the Communists (League of Communists of Croatia), but enjoying a degree of autonomy within the federation. The autonomy effectively increased through the 1974 Yugoslav Constitution, basically fulfilling a goal of the Croatian Spring movement, and providing a legal basis for independence of the federative constituents.


historical development

Republikom Slovenijom na Žumberku i Kupsko-čabranskoj dolini language Croatian trans_title Historical development and politico-geographical characteristics of the border and borderland between the Republic of Croatia and Republic of Slovenia on Žumberak and in the river valleys of Kupa and Čabranka first1 Helena Ilona last1 Bognar first2 Andrija last2 Bognar pages 187–224 accessdate 7 March 2012 and establishing a new section of Croatian border north of the Istrian peninsula


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of the SFR Yugoslavia (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia), ruled by the Communists (League of Communists of Croatia), but enjoying a degree of autonomy within the federation. The autonomy effectively increased through the 1974 Yugoslav Constitution, basically fulfilling a goal of the Croatian Spring movement, and providing a legal basis for independence of the federative constituents. Biography Zmaj was born in Novi Sad, then a city in Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) (Kingdom of Hungary, Austrian Empire), on November 24, 1833. He finished elementary school in the town, and secondary school in Pozony (Bratislava) (today Bratislava), later studying in Budapest, Prague and Vienna. In 1870, he returned to Novi Sad to work as a doctor, motivated by the fact that his wife and children were suffering from and eventually died from tuberculosis. During the Hungarian (Hungary during World War II)-German (Nazi Germany) Axis (Axis Powers) occupation (1941-1944), the area was included into Bács-Bodrog County. Since 1944, the area was part of autonomous Yugoslav (SFRY) Vojvodina (which was part of new socialist Yugoslav Serbia (SR Serbia) since 1945). The present-day districts of Serbia (Districts of Serbia) (including North Bačka District) were defined by the Government of Serbia's Enactment of 29 January 1992. During the German (Nazi Germany)-Hungarian (Hungary during World War II) Axis (Axis Powers) occupation (1941-1944), the area was divided between the Banat (Banat (1941-1944)) autonomous region (part of German-occupied puppet state of Serbia (Serbia (1941-1944))) in the east and the Bács-Bodrog County (an administrative unit of Horthy's (Miklos Horthy) Hungary (Hungary during World War II)) in the west. Initially, the Banat region was part of the rump Danube Banovina (whose capital was moved to Smederevo), but since December 1941, it was organized as one of the districts of Serbia and was officially named the District of Veliki Bečkerek. During the Hungarian (Hungary during World War II)-German (Nazi Germany) Axis (Axis Powers) occupation (1941-1944), the area was included into Bács-Bodrog County. Since 1944, the area was part of autonomous Yugoslav (SFRY) Vojvodina (which was part of new socialist Yugoslav Serbia (SR Serbia) since 1945). The present-day districts of Serbia (Districts of Serbia) (including West Bačka District) were defined by the Government of Serbia's Enactment of 29 January 1992. During the Hungarian (Hungary during World War II)-German (Nazi Germany) Axis (Axis Powers) occupation (1941-1944), the area was included into Bács-Bodrog County. Since 1944, the area was part of autonomous Yugoslav (SFRY) Vojvodina (which was part of new socialist Yugoslav Serbia (SR Serbia) since 1945). The present-day districts of Serbia (Districts of Serbia) (including South Bačka District) were defined by the Government of Serbia's Enactment of 29 January 1992. Early years Rákosi was born in Ada (Ada (Serbia)), a village in Bács County (Bács-Bodrog County) in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in Vojvodina, Serbia). Born into a Jewish family, the fourth son of a grocer (his mother would give birth to seven more children) he later repudiated religion and totally repudiated Judaism, consistent with Communist doctrine, which was atheistic. Reference for History of the Jews in Hungary - Search.com #Bács-Bodrog County (Zombor (Sombor), HU, CS) #Csongrád County (Csongrád County (former)) (Szentes, HU, CS) In the 18th and the first half of the 19th century, Futog was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 Futog was part of the Serbian Voivodship, a Serb autonomous region within Austrian Empire, while between 1849 and 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Austrian province. After the abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, Futog was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In 1910, population of the Old Futog was ethnically mixed (German-Serb), while population of the New Futog was mainly German. http: img190.imageshack.us img190 3899 vojvodina1910.png Other smaller ethnic groups in the town included Hungarians and Slovaks. During World War II (in 1941), after Axis Powers invaded and partitioned Yugoslavia, the town came under Axis (Axis powers) occupation and was attached to Bács-Bodrog County of Horthy's Hungary. After the defeat of Axis Powers, in 1944, one part of local German population left from the area, together with defeated German army. The antifascist council for the liberation of Yugoslavia (AVNOJ) declared the remaining German population as public enemies and sent them to communist prison camps. After the abolishment of the camps in 1948, the remaining German population left from Yugoslavia, mainly because of economical reasons. Since 1699, the town was part of the Habsburg Monarchy. It was included in the Habsburg Military Frontier. Between 1750 and 1763, the town was under civil administration (in the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) of the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary), until it was returned to the jurisdiction of the Military Frontier (Šajkaš Battalion). In 1848 1849, Titel was part of Serbian Vojvodina, a Serb autonomous region within the Habsburg Empire. Between 1849 and 1872, it was again part of the Military Frontier, and after 1872, it came under civil administration as a part of the Bács-Bodrog County within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary (part of Austria-Hungary). *Bačka. The coat of arms of Bačka was granted by Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor (1657-1705) in 1699. It was later (1861) retained for the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In blue field on a green grass stands Saint Paul (Paul of Tarsus) wearing blue shirt and brown toga with golden nimbus holding in dexter a downpointed silver sword with golden hilt and in sinister a black book (Bible). The Bačka-Bodrog county was divided between Yugoslavia and Hungary after World War I. The northern part of it was later incorporated into Bács-Kiskun county of Hungary, that also uses the coat of arms with St. Peter in its dexter half. thumb left Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran (File:Oil drilling facilities near Srbobran, Vojvodina, Serbia.jpg) According to archeology, there was human settlement in the territory of present-day Srbobran in the prehistoric times. The first written record about the settlement is from 1338, in which the Srbobran is mentioned under name ''Sentomas'', which means Saint Thomas (Thomas (Apostle)), i.e. the apostle Thomas, who was the patron saint of a monastery and of the village around it in the Middle Ages. During this time, the area was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bacsensis County (Bács-Bodrog County). This village, together with the monastery, became destroyed during the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) conquest in the 16th century. Its former population left the region and fled towards North to Habsburg Royal Hungary. During the Ottoman administration, the settlement of Sentomaš was rebuilt and was populated by ethnic Serbs. It was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. After the Bačka region was captured by Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) troops led by Prince Eugene of Savoy in the end of the 17th century, a settlement was included into Habsburg Monarchy and was populated by new colonists, mainly by ethnic Serbs from the South, but also (since the second half of the 18th century) by ethnic Hungarians from the North, who became the second largest ethnic group in the settlement (after Serbs). The settlement was part of the Military Frontier until 1751, when it came under the civil administration. A document from 1751 indicates that besides name ''Sentomaš'', the name ''Srbograd'' (Serb Town) was also used as a non-official denomination for the town. The development of the town was fast; in 1787 its population was 3,532, while in 1836 this number rose to 11,321. From 1751, the town was part of the Theiss District (District of Potisje) within the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) and the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). Until the middle of the 19th century, the settlement was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the settlement was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). In the second half of the 19th century some Rusyns (Pannonian Rusyns) were settled here as well. After 1867, colonization of Hungarians was intensified, and until the beginning of the 20th century they replaced Serbs as largest ethnic group in Kula. According to the 1910 census the population of Kula was ethnically mixed: from the total population of 9,119 there was 3,679 speakers of Hungarian (Hungarian language), 2,510 speakers of Serbian (Serbian language), 2,425 speakers of German (German language), and 456 speakers of Rusyn (Pannonian Rusyn language). History Tovariševo is one of the old Serb (Serbs) communities of Vojvodina, first mentioned in 1543, during Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) administration. It administratively was part of the Ottoman Sanjak of Segedin. In the end of the 17th century, the village was abandoned, but was repopulated in the beginning of the 18th century, during Habsburg (Habsburg Monarchy) administration. A description from the end of the 18th century (by András Vályi) states that ''"Tovarisova is a Rac (Raci (ethnonym))'' (Serb (Serbs)) ''village in Bács county (Bács-Bodrog County). The landowner is the Royal Hungarian Chamber and the population follows the old faith'' (i.e. Orthodox (Serbian Orthodoxy)). ''The black soil gives wheat, barley and oats, the village has an oak forest and a bad vineyard; it hasn't any water, but after the long autumn rains the soil became sodden; it lacks reed but it has silk-beetles. The nearest market-town is Újvidék ''(Novi Sad)'', where people can earn money from the sale of cattle."'' Until 1848, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of autonomous Serbian Vojvodina, while from 1849 to 1860, it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, which was a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship, in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). birth_date November 11, 1855 birth_place Zenta (Senta) (Serbian: Senta), Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County), Kingdom of Hungary, Austrian Empire death_date August 13, 1906 History The village was firstly mentioned in 1457. In this time it was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary and was part of the Bács (Bács-Bodrog County) (Bač) county. In the 16th-17th century, it was under administration of the Ottoman Empire and was part of the Sanjak of Segedin, firstly within the Budin Eyalet (Budin Province, Ottoman Empire) and later within the Egir Eyalet. During this time it was populated by ethnic Serbs. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. Until the middle of the 19th century, the village was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the village was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the village spoke Slovak language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language. In the end of the 17th century, the region of Bačka was captured by the Habsburg Monarchy and in the second half of the 18th century Crvenka was mentioned as a small settlement. It was colonized by Serbs, Hungarians and Germans. Until the middle of the 19th century, the town was part of the Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County) within the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary. In 1848-1849 it was part of the autonomous Serbian Vojvodina and from 1849 to 1860 it was part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar, a separate Habsburg crownland. After abolishment of the voivodeship in 1860, the town was again included into Batsch-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog County). According to 1910 census, most of the inhabitants of the town spoke German language.


SAD

and Slovenes and Hungary. Most of the county (including Sombor, Subotica, and Novi Sad) was assigned to the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, while the northernmost (approximately 15% of the county), including town of Baja, was assigned to Hungary. Between 1918 and 1922, the southern part of the former Bács-Bodrog county was a county of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes with a seat in Novi Sad. The northern part of the former county had been a county

Orthodox : 146,015 (18,0%) * Lutheran (Lutheranism): 70,098 (8,6%) * Calvinist (Calvinism): 29,772 (3,7%) * Jewish: 18,244 (2,3%) * Greek Catholic: 11,684 (1,4%) * Unitarianist (Unitarianism): 65 (0,0%) * Other or unknown: 1,825 (0,2%) As for the geographical distribution of the three largest ethnic groups in 1910, Hungarians mainly lived in northern parts of the county, Germans in western, and Serbs in the southern parts. Novi Sad, city in the southern part

Serbian : Novi Sad) - Zenta Zenta (Serbian (Serbian language): Senta) - Zombor Zombor (Serbian (Serbian language): Sombor) - Zsablya Zsablya (Serbian (Serbian language): Žabalj) - !colspan 2 Urban counties (''törvényhatósági jogú város'') - colspan 2 Baja (Baja (Hungary)) - colspan 2 Szabadka (Serbian (Serbian language): Subotica) - colspan 2 Újvidék (Serbian (Serbian language): Novi Sad) - colspan 2 Zombor ( Serbian language Serbian

Bács-Bodrog County

'''Bács-Bodrog''' County ( ) was the administrative county (comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary))) of the Habsburg Kingdom of Hungary from the 18th century to 1918. Its territory is currently in northern Serbia (western Vojvodina) and southern Hungary. The capital of the county was Zombor (Sombor) (Serbian: ''Sombor'').

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