Aunis

What is Aunis known for?


title art'

Charente place La Rochelle publisher H. Petit (publisher editor) year 1872 language French * *


collection quot

of the Emperor Diocletian, who made the provinces smaller to improve defence logistics, the The Romans also had interests in the "''Pays des Aulnes''" and had started to clear the Forest


large commercial

Yachts Dufour , Fontaine-Pajot). It is by far the largest hub of the department. It is also a large commercial port, the eighth largest in all France. In 2007 it was granted the status of ("self-governing port"). * Rochefort (Rochefort, Charente-Maritime) and Tonnay-Charente developed port activities on the Charente River. The two towns have diverse industrial activities with aerospace (EADS, Simair), automotive industry, ferrous and non


Separated

separated La Rochelle from Saintonge to set up a provincial government, comprising the jurisdictions of Rochefort, Marennes and, for a time, Benon. It was thus that Aunis legally became a separate province.''" Aunis was the smallest province in France, in terms of area. Nowadays it is a part of the Charente-Maritime ''département (département in France)'' together with Saintonge. People from Aunis were

, In the 9th and 10th

-Martin-de-Ré In 1374 the King officially separated Saintoinge in 1374 and set up Aunis: "''In 1374, Charles V separated La Rochelle from Saintonge to set up a provincial government, comprising the jurisdictions of Rochefort, Marennes and, for a time, Benon. It was thus that Aunis legally became a separate province.''" The province was much larger in mediaeval times, and underwent numerous changes to its borders. It extended from


dance songs

shared cultural ties with the others. The number of original immigrants was very small, and only about 100 surnames existed within the Acadian community. The West of France comprises the Pays de Nantes, the provinces of Vendée, Anjou and Maine, and the Poitou-Charentes region. Traditions of ballad-singing, dance-songs and fiddle-playing have survived, predominantly in Poitou and the Vendée. Jérôme Bujeaud


Separated

separated La Rochelle from Saintonge to set up a provincial government, comprising the jurisdictions of Rochefort, Marennes and, for a time, Benon. It was thus that Aunis legally became a separate province.''" Aunis was the smallest province in France, in terms of area. Nowadays it is a part of the Charente-Maritime ''département (département in France)'' together with Saintonge. People from Aunis were

, In the 9th and 10th

-Martin-de-Ré In 1374 the King officially separated Saintoinge in 1374 and set up Aunis: "''In 1374, Charles V separated La Rochelle from Saintonge to set up a provincial government, comprising the jurisdictions of Rochefort, Marennes and, for a time, Benon. It was thus that Aunis legally became a separate province.''" The province was much larger in mediaeval times, and underwent numerous changes to its borders. It extended from


scale production

These small-scale production sites were particularly numerous in the north of the Gulf of Santones, equally along the coastline, in the deep estuaries, and all around the islands (notably the Île d'Albe). Commune of Muron The salt sites were quickly abandoned after the Roman conquest, because the new colonists brought with them a better-performing and more-productive technique for producing salt. Nevertheless, the Romans preferred


interpretations

Alnensis , appeared in the last will and testament of Count Roger. , took a prudent view of the interpretation of its name: "The etymology of ''Aunis'', which is found in many different forms in Latin, has been the object of studies between which it is difficult

interpretations which deserve consideration: * the name should be linked to the forest, because the ). "Aunis was written ''pagus aliennensis'' or ''pagus alnisius''; in French said "pays des aulnes". Logically since the sea advanced further into the interior than it does today, this ''pagus aliniensis


singing dance

shared cultural ties with the others. The number of original immigrants was very small, and only about 100 surnames existed within the Acadian community. The West of France comprises the Pays de Nantes, the provinces of Vendée, Anjou and Maine, and the Poitou-Charentes region. Traditions of ballad-singing, dance-songs and fiddle-playing have survived, predominantly in Poitou and the Vendée. Jérôme Bujeaud


made life

for Protestants, which made life so intolerable that many fled the country. The Huguenot population of France dropped to 856,000 by the mid-1660s, of which a plurality lived in rural areas. The greatest concentrations of Huguenots at this time resided in the regions of Guienne, Saintonge-Aunis-Angoumois and Poitou.

Aunis

'''Aunis''' is a historical province of France (Provinces of France), situated in the north-west of the department of Charente-Maritime. Its historic capital is La Rochelle, which took over from Castrum Allionis (Châtelaillon) (Châtelaillon-Plage) the historic capital which gives its name to the province.

It was a fief of the Duchy of Aquitaine. It extended to Marais Poitevin in the north, Basse Saintonge (and Niortais) in the east, and Rochefortais in the south. Aunis had an influence approximately 20–25 km into the Isle of Ré (Île de Ré) (''l'Île de Ré'').

The province was officially recognised during the reign of Charles V of France (Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor) in 1374: "''In 1374, Charles V separated La Rochelle from Saintonge to set up a provincial government, comprising the jurisdictions of Rochefort, Marennes and, for a time, Benon. It was thus that Aunis legally became a separate province.''"

Aunis was the smallest province in France, in terms of area. Nowadays it is a part of the Charente-Maritime ''département (département in France)'' together with Saintonge.

People from Aunis were called ''Aunisien'' (masculine) or ''Aunisienne'' (feminine). The English term is ''Aunisian''.

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