Arroyo Seco, Querétaro

What is Arroyo Seco, Querétaro known for?


national arts

name "premio" Typical dishes include jerky, cecina (cecina (meat)), “Serrano” style enchiladas and pit cooked barbacoa. Sweets include “chancaquillas” which is made with piloncillo and squash seeds. Beverages include aguamiel


current events

About 37% lives in the 1420 communities with between 1 and 1,999 inhabitants, and 16% in communities of between 2,000 and 14,999. The population of the state is sparse in most areas, concentrated in only one true urban center and some smaller communities. Living standards are higher than average for Mexico in and around the city of Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), but diminish significantly in the rural areas. The Jalpan de Serra region includes this municipality and Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Pinal de Amoles, Landa de Matamoros and San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro). Agriculture is limited, mostly producing fruits such as citrus, mangos, coffee, peaches and apples. Fish farming is a growing and promising enterprise for the areas. Industry is also very limited. - 003 Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) 731.17 12,493 17.1 0.7029 - thumb The municipality within the state (File:Pinal de Amoles en Queretaro.svg) The municipality has a total 198 communities which together make up a territory of 705.3698 km². The most important of these are Pinal de Amoles, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe, San Pedro el Viejo, Santa Águeda, San Pedro Escanela and Bucareli. The municipality’s government is formed by a municipal president, and nine officials called “regidors”. The municipality borders the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Cadereyta de Montes, Jalpan de Serra and Peñamiller with the state of Guanajuato on the west. The municipality has no indigenous communities and only 42 people who could speak an indigenous language as of 2005. Population growth from 2000 to 2005 was 0.26%. Of a total of 198 communities in the municipality, 72 have a population of under fifty residents, with 37 communities of less than 100 and 82 communities of less the 500. Only seven communities have a population of between 500 and 2000 people. There is a very high percentage of people who emigrate from the area to large cities in Mexico into the United States in order to find work. This is particularly true for the small communities in the delegations of San Pedro Escanela, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe and Santa Águeda. For this reason, the rate of population growth for the municipality has been very low, even though birthrates are relatively high. As of 2005, the population stood at 25,325.Over 93% of residents are Catholic. The first inhabitants of the region were hunter-gatherers as early as 6000 BC. Starting from the 13th century groups of Pames and Chichimeca Jonaz came to the area. Communities of these groups were still found in areas such as El Cuervo, Puerto de Vigas, El Rodezno, Tonatico, Escanela and others when the Spanish arrived in the 16th century. Starting from 1534, the Spanish established the province of Xilotepec, which encompassed much of the land around what is now the Sierra Gorda in Querétaro, but it did not manage to dominate this area for centuries because of the fierce resistance of the native peoples, especially the Chichimeca Jonaz. However, the Spanish penetrated the area for evangelization, military purposes and prospecting. The first mine was in Escanelas in 1599. Pinal de Amoles, initially called Real de San José de Amoles, was established in 1606. It was named an Alcaldía Mayor Real with official jurisdiction over what is now the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Jalpan de Serra, Landa de Matamoros, Pinal de Amoles, San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Peñamiller and Cadereyta de Montes. However, this seat of government would be transferred to Cadereyta as the silver from the mines dwindled by 1675. However, this Alcaldía Mayor would form over half of the future state of Querétaro.


century starting

are Catholic. The first inhabitants of the region were hunter-gatherers as early as 6000 BC. Starting from the 13th century groups of Pames and Chichimeca Jonaz came to the area. Communities of these groups were still found in areas such as El Cuervo, Puerto de Vigas, El Rodezno, Tonatico, Escanela and others when the Spanish arrived in the 16th century. Starting from 1534, the Spanish established the province of Xilotepec, which encompassed much


popular arts

Reyes Reyes from El Refugio won the Premio Nacional de Ciencias y Artes in the Popular Arts category. He won the award for his contributions to Huapango arribeño. Reyes formed the band, Los Reyes de El Refugio and their work mostly focuses on rural life in the Sierra Gorda. He was born 1931, but had to work at farming early, learning to read and write mostly on his own. He was taught guitar and found he had musical ability, becoming a cantor at the local church when he was 14. ref


musical ability

Reyes Reyes from El Refugio won the Premio Nacional de Ciencias y Artes in the Popular Arts category. He won the award for his contributions to Huapango arribeño. Reyes formed the band, Los Reyes de El Refugio and their work mostly focuses on rural life in the Sierra Gorda. He was born 1931, but had to work at farming early, learning to read and write mostly on his own. He was taught guitar and found he had musical ability, becoming a cantor at the local church when he was 14. About 37% lives in the 1420 communities with between 1 and 1,999 inhabitants, and 16% in communities of between 2,000 and 14,999. The population of the state is sparse in most areas, concentrated in only one true urban center and some smaller communities. Living standards are higher than average for Mexico in and around the city of Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), but diminish significantly in the rural areas. The Jalpan de Serra region includes this municipality and Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Pinal de Amoles, Landa de Matamoros and San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro). Agriculture is limited, mostly producing fruits such as citrus, mangos, coffee, peaches and apples. Fish farming is a growing and promising enterprise for the areas. Industry is also very limited. - 003 Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) 731.17 12,493 17.1 0.7029 - thumb The municipality within the state (File:Pinal de Amoles en Queretaro.svg) The municipality has a total 198 communities which together make up a territory of 705.3698 km². The most important of these are Pinal de Amoles, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe, San Pedro el Viejo, Santa Águeda, San Pedro Escanela and Bucareli. The municipality’s government is formed by a municipal president, and nine officials called “regidors”. The municipality borders the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Cadereyta de Montes, Jalpan de Serra and Peñamiller with the state of Guanajuato on the west. The municipality has no indigenous communities and only 42 people who could speak an indigenous language as of 2005. Population growth from 2000 to 2005 was 0.26%. Of a total of 198 communities in the municipality, 72 have a population of under fifty residents, with 37 communities of less than 100 and 82 communities of less the 500. Only seven communities have a population of between 500 and 2000 people. There is a very high percentage of people who emigrate from the area to large cities in Mexico into the United States in order to find work. This is particularly true for the small communities in the delegations of San Pedro Escanela, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe and Santa Águeda. For this reason, the rate of population growth for the municipality has been very low, even though birthrates are relatively high. As of 2005, the population stood at 25,325.Over 93% of residents are Catholic. The first inhabitants of the region were hunter-gatherers as early as 6000 BC. Starting from the 13th century groups of Pames and Chichimeca Jonaz came to the area. Communities of these groups were still found in areas such as El Cuervo, Puerto de Vigas, El Rodezno, Tonatico, Escanela and others when the Spanish arrived in the 16th century. Starting from 1534, the Spanish established the province of Xilotepec, which encompassed much of the land around what is now the Sierra Gorda in Querétaro, but it did not manage to dominate this area for centuries because of the fierce resistance of the native peoples, especially the Chichimeca Jonaz. However, the Spanish penetrated the area for evangelization, military purposes and prospecting. The first mine was in Escanelas in 1599. Pinal de Amoles, initially called Real de San José de Amoles, was established in 1606. It was named an Alcaldía Mayor Real with official jurisdiction over what is now the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Jalpan de Serra, Landa de Matamoros, Pinal de Amoles, San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Peñamiller and Cadereyta de Montes. However, this seat of government would be transferred to Cadereyta as the silver from the mines dwindled by 1675. However, this Alcaldía Mayor would form over half of the future state of Querétaro.


efforts related'

eighty percent of the forest is made up solely of broad-leafed trees with most of the rest a mix of broad-leafed and conifers. Logging is limited because of the tropical hardwoods here and conservation efforts related to the Sierra Gorda Biosphere Reserve, but it still makes up over 15% of the state’s total. About 19% of the forested lands are used for grazing. Fish farming is a growing segment of the economy, especially in communities near rivers such as Río del Carrizal, Concá, Vegas Cuatas and Ayutla. About 25% are working in mining, construction, utilities and manufacturing. Commerce, transportation and services employ about eighteen percent. There are about 140 people dedicated to commerce, most of which is small grocery stores. Supermarkets and other similar stores are located in neighboring San Luis Potosí in Río Verde (Rioverde, San Luis Potosí) and San Ciro (San Ciro de Acosta). Tourism is a small percentage of the economy, mostly based on the mission church at Concá and some resort hotels opened in recent years. During the colonial period, there were several haciendas in the municipality. One of these was San Nicolás de Concá, which still has abundant vegetation, a large fresh water spring and hiking trails. The main house has been converted into a hotel, conserving part of the original structure made of adobe, with rustic stairs, wooden roof beams and gardens. The San Nicolas Conca hotel is owned by an American by the name of Sharpton. The hacienda was originally dedicated to sugar cane and dates from the 18th century. It has fifty rooms and a 1000 year old kapok tree which grows at a fresh water spring, called the Árbol Milenario or Millennium Tree. Its trunk has the second largest diameter in Mexico after the Tule tree in Oaxaca (Árbol del Tule), requiring twenty two children linking hands to surround it. From its roots flows one of the fresh water springs of the community. The El Abanico water park has two swimming pools, a wading pool, restaurant and gardens and areas for camping. It is located next to the Concá Hacienda. The Hotel Ayutla water park has two swimming pools, three wading pools, sports fields, picnic areas, restaurant, gardens and areas to camp. Archeology The San Rafael site was first documented in 1939 by the Instituto Panamericano de Geografía e Historia. Some work was done on the site by archeologists such as Dominique Michelet for about a decade. This work determined that the site was occupied from 200 to 900 CE as a Mesoamerican city with temples, plazas, patios and residences located around four Mesoamerican ball courts. The city was a regional seat of government with strong Huasteca influence. It had a total of 250 buildings even larger than the better known sites of Las Ranas and Toluquilla . Eight to ten structures are considered destroyed and more may have suffered irreversible damage by acids eating way the limestone blocks. As of 2006, the limits of the sites have still not been defined. The vestiges of the site lie about three hundred meters below the dump. The site belongs to the Río Verde Culture and its estimated to extend over 10km2. Its importance has been compared to that of Tamtoc in San Luis Potosí. About 37% lives in the 1420 communities with between 1 and 1,999 inhabitants, and 16% in communities of between 2,000 and 14,999. The population of the state is sparse in most areas, concentrated in only one true urban center and some smaller communities. Living standards are higher than average for Mexico in and around the city of Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), but diminish significantly in the rural areas. The Jalpan de Serra region includes this municipality and Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Pinal de Amoles, Landa de Matamoros and San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro). Agriculture is limited, mostly producing fruits such as citrus, mangos, coffee, peaches and apples. Fish farming is a growing and promising enterprise for the areas. Industry is also very limited. - 003 Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) 731.17 12,493 17.1 0.7029 - thumb The municipality within the state (File:Pinal de Amoles en Queretaro.svg) The municipality has a total 198 communities which together make up a territory of 705.3698 km². The most important of these are Pinal de Amoles, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe, San Pedro el Viejo, Santa Águeda, San Pedro Escanela and Bucareli. The municipality’s government is formed by a municipal president, and nine officials called “regidors”. The municipality borders the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Cadereyta de Montes, Jalpan de Serra and Peñamiller with the state of Guanajuato on the west. The municipality has no indigenous communities and only 42 people who could speak an indigenous language as of 2005. Population growth from 2000 to 2005 was 0.26%. Of a total of 198 communities in the municipality, 72 have a population of under fifty residents, with 37 communities of less than 100 and 82 communities of less the 500. Only seven communities have a population of between 500 and 2000 people. There is a very high percentage of people who emigrate from the area to large cities in Mexico into the United States in order to find work. This is particularly true for the small communities in the delegations of San Pedro Escanela, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe and Santa Águeda. For this reason, the rate of population growth for the municipality has been very low, even though birthrates are relatively high. As of 2005, the population stood at 25,325.Over 93% of residents are Catholic. The first inhabitants of the region were hunter-gatherers as early as 6000 BC. Starting from the 13th century groups of Pames and Chichimeca Jonaz came to the area. Communities of these groups were still found in areas such as El Cuervo, Puerto de Vigas, El Rodezno, Tonatico, Escanela and others when the Spanish arrived in the 16th century. Starting from 1534, the Spanish established the province of Xilotepec, which encompassed much of the land around what is now the Sierra Gorda in Querétaro, but it did not manage to dominate this area for centuries because of the fierce resistance of the native peoples, especially the Chichimeca Jonaz. However, the Spanish penetrated the area for evangelization, military purposes and prospecting. The first mine was in Escanelas in 1599. Pinal de Amoles, initially called Real de San José de Amoles, was established in 1606. It was named an Alcaldía Mayor Real with official jurisdiction over what is now the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Jalpan de Serra, Landa de Matamoros, Pinal de Amoles, San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Peñamiller and Cadereyta de Montes. However, this seat of government would be transferred to Cadereyta as the silver from the mines dwindled by 1675. However, this Alcaldía Mayor would form over half of the future state of Querétaro.


work characteristic

name "salpicada" It is considered to have the most indigenous elements, with many of its elements showing the more brusque work characteristic


location called

with most located in the communities of Salitrillo, Concá and Ayutla. The municipality is home to the junction of two of the major rivers of the Sierra Gorda, the Santa María and the Ayutla River at a location called Las Adjuntas. The Santa María River here flows warm to hot in the summer and the Ayutla River remains cold. Although the two rivers have different water colors


numerous small

, is on former sea bed from 150 million years ago. Recently, Arroyo Seco and other municipalities of the Sierra Gorda have reported numerous small earthquakes. According to seismologists, these are caused by the movement of water through sedimentary rock. Erosion causes gaps and then the gaps settle onto themselves, causing the small quakes. One thing scientists are checking for is to see if any areas stand over underground cavities which may give way.

cows in Guanajuato From the latter 2000s to the present, Arroyo Seco and the rest of the Sierra Gorda in Querétaro have been experiencing numerous small earthquakes, with most registering from 2.5 to 3.5 on the Richter scale, generally imperceptible to humans. Seismologists say that while the number has been unusual, such activity is not and is due to the settling of the sedimentary rock which is below most of the Sierra Gorda region. However, Arroyo Seco and other municipalities have seismographs installed to monitor the situation. About 37% lives in the 1420 communities with between 1 and 1,999 inhabitants, and 16% in communities of between 2,000 and 14,999. The population of the state is sparse in most areas, concentrated in only one true urban center and some smaller communities. Living standards are higher than average for Mexico in and around the city of Querétaro (Querétaro, Querétaro), but diminish significantly in the rural areas. The Jalpan de Serra region includes this municipality and Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Pinal de Amoles, Landa de Matamoros and San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro). Agriculture is limited, mostly producing fruits such as citrus, mangos, coffee, peaches and apples. Fish farming is a growing and promising enterprise for the areas. Industry is also very limited. - 003 Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro) 731.17 12,493 17.1 0.7029 - thumb The municipality within the state (File:Pinal de Amoles en Queretaro.svg) The municipality has a total 198 communities which together make up a territory of 705.3698 km². The most important of these are Pinal de Amoles, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe, San Pedro el Viejo, Santa Águeda, San Pedro Escanela and Bucareli. The municipality’s government is formed by a municipal president, and nine officials called “regidors”. The municipality borders the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Cadereyta de Montes, Jalpan de Serra and Peñamiller with the state of Guanajuato on the west. The municipality has no indigenous communities and only 42 people who could speak an indigenous language as of 2005. Population growth from 2000 to 2005 was 0.26%. Of a total of 198 communities in the municipality, 72 have a population of under fifty residents, with 37 communities of less than 100 and 82 communities of less the 500. Only seven communities have a population of between 500 and 2000 people. There is a very high percentage of people who emigrate from the area to large cities in Mexico into the United States in order to find work. This is particularly true for the small communities in the delegations of San Pedro Escanela, Ahuacatlán de Guadalupe and Santa Águeda. For this reason, the rate of population growth for the municipality has been very low, even though birthrates are relatively high. As of 2005, the population stood at 25,325.Over 93% of residents are Catholic. The first inhabitants of the region were hunter-gatherers as early as 6000 BC. Starting from the 13th century groups of Pames and Chichimeca Jonaz came to the area. Communities of these groups were still found in areas such as El Cuervo, Puerto de Vigas, El Rodezno, Tonatico, Escanela and others when the Spanish arrived in the 16th century. Starting from 1534, the Spanish established the province of Xilotepec, which encompassed much of the land around what is now the Sierra Gorda in Querétaro, but it did not manage to dominate this area for centuries because of the fierce resistance of the native peoples, especially the Chichimeca Jonaz. However, the Spanish penetrated the area for evangelization, military purposes and prospecting. The first mine was in Escanelas in 1599. Pinal de Amoles, initially called Real de San José de Amoles, was established in 1606. It was named an Alcaldía Mayor Real with official jurisdiction over what is now the municipalities of Arroyo Seco (Arroyo Seco, Querétaro), Jalpan de Serra, Landa de Matamoros, Pinal de Amoles, San Joaquín (San Joaquín, Querétaro), Peñamiller and Cadereyta de Montes. However, this seat of government would be transferred to Cadereyta as the silver from the mines dwindled by 1675. However, this Alcaldía Mayor would form over half of the future state of Querétaro.


great green

; In comparison the Sótano de Las Golondrinas has a volume of only five million meters cubed. Its widest diameter measures 420 meters and its average width is 200 meters. It has a total depth of 455 meters with a direct drop of 410 meters. Its perimeter is surrounded by dense vegetation, which is a sanctuary for green macaws (Great Green Macaw). It requires a walk or mule ride of about two hours through dense forest to reach. The walls of the pit cave are mostly vertical and partially covered

Arroyo Seco, Querétaro

'''Arroyo Seco''' is a town and municipality (municipalities of Mexico) located in the far north of the Mexican (Mexico) state of Querétaro. Its territory is part of the Sierra Gorda Biosphere Reserve of Querétaro (Sierra Gorda). The municipality is centered on the small town of Arroyo Seco, which was established as a military outpost then given town status in 1833 under the name of Villa de Guadalupe before changing to its current name. The town gained municipal status in 1931. The area is very rural with most people living in communities of under 100 people, with significant Pame communities. It has a traditional economy based on agriculture, livestock and forestry but it is also one of the poorest in Mexico, with high rates of emigration, especially sending migrant workers to the United States. It is estimated that one in four households in the municipality receives money from family members in this country. The municipality is also home to one of five Franciscan mission complexes (Franciscan Missions in the Sierra Gorda) built under the tenure of Junípero Serra, located in the community of Concá.

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