Allgemeine SS

What is Allgemeine SS known for?


membership

of this quarter. Höhne, Heinz (Heinz Höhne) ''Der Orden ...'', pg 56-57: Der Orden unter dem Totenkopf, P. to 56-57 (The book has also been translated into English with the title ''The Order of the Death's Head: The Story of Hitler's SS'' ) From that point on the SS would be considered, therefore, '' de facto'' independent. By December of that same year, the SS had a membership of 2,727. Himmler now looked to another source for recruits to the SS

, but hardly ever even noticed by the Soviet Red Army, in particular in situations where SS and Police Leaders or other SS units involved in genocide, would fall into Soviet hands. Friedrich Jecklen, who was granted Waffen-SS rank in 1944, was captured by the Russians and held as a criminal with no status given to his military rank. Total manpower In 1945, the stated membership number of SS was over 840,000 members. Of these, 48,500 were members of the Allgemeine SS. Much

!" — naval command; "All hands, abandon ship!" * Allgemeine SS — "General SS", general main body of the Schutzstaffel made up of the full-time administrative, security, intelligence and police branches of the SS as well as the broader part-time membership which turned out for parades, rallies and "street actions" such as ''Kristallnacht''; also comprised reserve and honorary members. * Alte Hasen — "Old hares"; slang for military veterans who


quot lead

equivalent to a ''Generalmajor'' might only be ranked as a ''Rottenführer'' ("Lance Corporal") in the Waffen-SS. If this same SS member were an architectural engineer (Architectural engineering), then the SS-HA would issue a third rank of ''Sonderführer'' ("Lead Technical Specialist"). SS members could also hold reserve commissions in the regular military as well as a Nazi Party political rank (Ranks and insignia of the Nazi Party). Add


part time

was administratively divided into these main sections: * Full-time officers and members of the main SS departments, including the RSHA * Part-time volunteer members of SS regional units * SS security forces, e.g., the Gestapo and Sicherheitsdienst (SD) * Concentration Camp staffs of the Totenkopfverbände * Reserve, honorary or otherwise inactive SS members After World War II began in 1939, the lines between the Allgemeine-SS and the Waffen-SS became increasingly blurred, due

combat or be listed as inactive reservists. By 1944, with Germany's looming defeat, the draft exemption for the Allgemeine-SS main offices was lifted and many junior members were ordered into combat with senior members assuming duties as Waffen-SS generals. SS regional units The core of the Allgemeine-SS were part-time mustering formations spread throughout Germany. Members in these regional units would typically meet once a week in uniform, as well as participate in various Nazi Party

of the Allgemeine-SS were still part-time only. Regular Allgemeine-SS personnel were also not exempt from conscription and many were called up to serve in the Wehrmacht. By 1942, most of the part time Allgemeine-SS had either joined the Waffen-SS or had been conscripted into the regular German military. The senior levels of the Abschnitte and Oberabschnitte were considered draft exempt, but most of these SS leaders and staff were themselves merged into the offices of the SS and Police


quot main

solidified into its final form, mainly two large contingents, these being the Allgemeine-SS and Waffen-SS. With Himmler as Chief of the German Police, the SS also controlled the Ordnungspolizei, which over the course of World War II would be increasingly overshadowed and infiltrated by the SS. Hierarchy and structure The term ''Allgemeine-SS'' referred to the "General-SS", meaning those units of the SS considered "main, regular, or standard". By 1938, the Allgemeine-SS was administratively divided into these main sections: * Full-time officers and members of the main SS departments, including the RSHA * Part-time volunteer members of SS regional units * SS security forces, e.g., the Gestapo and Sicherheitsdienst (SD) * Concentration Camp staffs of the Totenkopfverbände * Reserve, honorary or otherwise inactive SS members After World War II began in 1939, the lines between the Allgemeine-SS and the Waffen-SS became increasingly blurred, due largely to the Allgemeine-SS headquarters offices having administrative and supply command over the Waffen-SS. By 1940, all of the Allgemeine-SS had been issued grey war-time uniforms and by 1941 the black SS uniform had been taken out of circulation for the most part. Full time SS personnel Approximately one third of the Allgemeine-SS were considered "full time" meaning that they received a salary as government employees, were employed full-time in an SS office, and performed SS duties as their primary occupation. The vast majority of such full-time SS personnel were assigned to the main SS offices, considered part of the Allgemeine-SS, and divided as follows: * SS-Hauptamt (SS-HA): * SS-Hauptamt Persönlicher Stab RFSS (Persönlicher Stab Reichsführer-SS) (HaPerStab) * SS Personalhauptamt (SS PHA) * SS Führungshauptamt (SS FHA) * Hauptamt SS-Gericht (HA SS-Gericht) * SS-Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA) * SS-Rasse- und Siedlungshauptamt (RuSHA) * Hauptamt Volksdeutsche Mittelstelle (VOMI) * Reichskommissar für die Festigung deutschen Volkstums (Hauptamt_Volksdeutsche_Mittelstelle#RKFDV) (RKF or RKFDV) * SS-Wirtschafts-Verwaltungshauptamt (SS-WVHA) Main office commanders and staff were exempt from military conscription. Although many, such as Reinhard Heydrich, served as reservists in the regular German military. Main office members did join the Waffen-SS, where they could accept a lower rank and serve in active combat or be listed as inactive reservists. By 1944, with Germany's looming defeat, the draft exemption for the Allgemeine-SS main offices was lifted and many junior members were ordered into combat with senior members assuming duties as Waffen-SS generals. SS regional units The core of the Allgemeine-SS were part-time mustering formations spread throughout Germany. Members in these regional units would typically meet once a week in uniform, as well as participate in various Nazi Party functions. Activities including drill and ideological instruction, marching in parades, and providing security at various Nazi party rallies.'' Regional SS units were organized into commands known as ''SS-Oberabschnitt'' (region), ''Abschnitt'' (district), and ''Standarten'' (regiment). Before 1934, SS personnel received no pay and their work was completely voluntarily. After 1933, the Oberabschnitt commanders and their staff became regarded as "full time" but the rank and file of the Allgemeine-SS were still part-time only. Regular Allgemeine-SS personnel were also not exempt from conscription and many were called up to serve in the Wehrmacht. By 1942, most of the part time Allgemeine-SS had either joined the Waffen-SS or had been conscripted into the regular German military. The senior levels of the Abschnitte and Oberabschnitte were considered draft exempt, but most of these SS leaders and staff were themselves merged into the offices of the SS and Police Leaders which were considered as quasi-military commands with Waffen-SS authority, although on paper still part of the Allgemeine-SS. Draft exemption for these senior leadership staffs was itself lifted in 1944, and most of the remaining Allgemeine-SS personnel were assigned to the Waffen-SS as reservists. Security forces From 1936, the state security police forces of the Gestapo and Kripo (Criminal Police) were consolidated and placed under the central command of Reinhard Heydrich, already chief of the party ''Sicherheitsdienst'' (SD), and named Sicherheitspolizei. Later from 27 September 1939 forward, they were all folded into the Reich Main Security Office (RSHA) (RSHA) which was placed under Heydrich's control. The ordinary uniformed German police, known as the Ordnungspolizei (Orpo) were also under SS control after 1936 but never incorporated into the Allgemeine-SS, although many police members were also dual SS members. The death squad units of the Einsatzgruppen were considered part of the Allgemeine-SS and under the operational control of the RSHA. The units were themselves a mixture of civilian (SS auxiliary), police, and SS personnel, although all Einsatzgruppen personnel wore grey Waffen-SS type uniforms in the performance of their duties. During World War II, security force personnel were seen as performing "essential duties" to the Reich and thus were exempt from conscription into military service. Many such personnel, however, typically joined the Waffen-SS or served in the Wehrmacht military reserve. SS-Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann, for instance, was an Untersturmführer in the Waffen-SS Reserve while Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Kappler was a Reserve Feldwebel (Sergeant) in the German Army. As Germany began losing World War II, the draft exemption for security forces was slowly lifted, although due to the nature of the Nazi regime, there was a constant need for security personnel up until the very end of the Third Reich. For this reason, many Gestapo, SD, and Kripo members who served as reservists never saw combat until the very last days of the war, if at all. Concentration camp personnel All Concentration Camp staffs were originally part of the Allgemeine-SS under the office of the Concentration Camps Inspectorate (Inspektion der Konzentrationslager or IKL). First headed by Theodor Eicke, the Concentration Camps were formed into the Totenkopfverbände after 1934, but then increasingly became divided into the camp service proper and the military Totenkopf formation controlled by the SS-Verfungstruppe (the early Waffen-SS). After 1942, the entire camp service was placed under the authority of the Waffen-SS for a variety of administrative and logistical reasons. The ultimate command authority for the camp system during World War II was the SS-Wirtschafts-Verwaltungshauptamt (WHVA). Other units By late 1940 the Allgemeine-SS also controlled the ''Germanische SS (Germanic SS)'', which were collaborationist organizations modeled after the Allgemeine-SS in several Western European countries. The Allgemeine-SS also consisted of a female volunteer corps (known as the SS-Helferinnen) and, in the last days of World War II, had authority over the so-called "Auxiliary-SS" which were non-SS personnel conscripted in the SS to serve as concentration camp personnel in the last months of World War II. Ranks The ranks (Ranks and insignia of the Schutzstaffel) of the Allgemeine SS and the Waffen-SS were based upon those of the SA and used the same titles. However, there was a distinctly separate hierarchical subdivisions of the larger Waffen-SS from its Allgemeine counterpart and an SS member could in fact hold two separate SS ranks. For instance, a ''Brigadeführer'' ("Brigadier General") of the Allgemeine SS equivalent to a ''Generalmajor'' might only be ranked as a ''Rottenführer'' ("Lance Corporal") in the Waffen-SS. If this same SS member were an architectural engineer (Architectural engineering), then the SS-HA would issue a third rank of ''Sonderführer'' ("Lead Technical Specialist"). SS members could also hold reserve commissions in the regular military as well as a Nazi Party political rank (Ranks and insignia of the Nazi Party). Add to this that many senior SS members were also employees of the Federal government in capacities as ministers, deputies, etc., and an SS member could in the end have as many as five ranks in various organizations as well as a number of additional titles. Per one SS historian: ''Multiple and overlapping commands were very commonplace... A man could hold one post while temporarily assigned to another and hold rank in the Allgemeine-SS, Waffen-SS and Polizei simultaneously... I'm thoroughly convinced even Berlin was not 100% sure who was in certain positions at exact points in time, confirmed by individual BDC records.'' - Mark Yerger, ''Allgemeine-SS'' Yerger, p. 10. Yerger attempted to list all HSSPF, SSPF, Oberabschnitt, Abschnitt, and Standarten of the SS, plus maps, photos, and mini-biographies. The BDC (the Berlin Document Center) a US managed collection of captured Nazi documents in Berlin, was one of his sources. The collection is now part of the German Bundesarchiv. In 1944, nearly every SS general was granted equivalent Waffen-SS rank, without regard to previous military service. This was mainly ordered so to give SS-generals authority over military units and POW camps. Also, in the event of capture by the Allies (Allies of World War II), SS-Generals would be given status as military prisoners rather than captured police officials. This distinction was observed by British and American forces in the West, but hardly ever even noticed by the Soviet Red Army, in particular in situations where SS and Police Leaders or other SS units involved in genocide, would fall into Soviet hands. Friedrich Jecklen, who was granted Waffen-SS rank in 1944, was captured by the Russians and held as a criminal with no status given to his military rank. Total manpower In 1945, the stated membership number of SS was over 840,000 members. Of these, 48,500 were members of the Allgemeine SS. Much of the remainder were 18,000 officers, 52,000 NCOs, and 600,000 enlisted members of the Waffen-SS and 130,000 police. Order of Battle ) (VOMI) an organization charged with settling ethnic Germans in the German Reich (Nazi Germany) from other parts of Europe.


706'

Mollo: ''A Pictorial History of the SS, 1923-1945'', ISBN 0-7128-2174-0 * Felix Steiner: ''Die Armee der Geächteten'', ISBN 3-920722-10-8 * Max Williams: ''Reinhard Heydrich: The Biography: Volume 1'', Ulric Publishing 2001, ISBN 0-9537577-5-7 * Gordon Williamson: ''Die Waffen-SS 1933-1945. Ein Handbuch'', ISBN 3-85492-706-1 * Gordon Williamson: ''Die SS - Hitlers Instrument der Macht. Die Geschichte der SS von der Schutzstaffel bis zur Waffen-SS'', ISBN 3-7043-6037-6 * Mark C. Yerger


time quot

largely to the Allgemeine-SS headquarters offices having administrative and supply command over the Waffen-SS. By 1940, all of the Allgemeine-SS had been issued grey war-time uniforms and by 1941 the black SS uniform had been taken out of circulation for the most part. Full time SS personnel Approximately one third of the Allgemeine-SS were considered "full time" meaning that they received a salary as government employees, were employed full-time in an SS office, and performed SS duties as their primary occupation. The vast majority of such full-time SS personnel were assigned to the main SS offices, considered part of the Allgemeine-SS, and divided as follows: * SS-Hauptamt (SS-HA): * SS-Hauptamt Persönlicher Stab RFSS (Persönlicher Stab Reichsführer-SS) (HaPerStab) * SS Personalhauptamt (SS PHA) * SS Führungshauptamt (SS FHA) * Hauptamt SS-Gericht (HA SS-Gericht) * SS-Reichssicherheitshauptamt (RSHA) * SS-Rasse- und Siedlungshauptamt (RuSHA) * Hauptamt Volksdeutsche Mittelstelle (VOMI) * Reichskommissar für die Festigung deutschen Volkstums (Hauptamt_Volksdeutsche_Mittelstelle#RKFDV) (RKF or RKFDV) * SS-Wirtschafts-Verwaltungshauptamt (SS-WVHA) Main office commanders and staff were exempt from military conscription. Although many, such as Reinhard Heydrich, served as reservists in the regular German military. Main office members did join the Waffen-SS, where they could accept a lower rank and serve in active combat or be listed as inactive reservists. By 1944, with Germany's looming defeat, the draft exemption for the Allgemeine-SS main offices was lifted and many junior members were ordered into combat with senior members assuming duties as Waffen-SS generals. SS regional units The core of the Allgemeine-SS were part-time mustering formations spread throughout Germany. Members in these regional units would typically meet once a week in uniform, as well as participate in various Nazi Party functions. Activities including drill and ideological instruction, marching in parades, and providing security at various Nazi party rallies.'' Regional SS units were organized into commands known as ''SS-Oberabschnitt'' (region), ''Abschnitt'' (district), and ''Standarten'' (regiment). Before 1934, SS personnel received no pay and their work was completely voluntarily. After 1933, the Oberabschnitt commanders and their staff became regarded as "full time" but the rank and file of the Allgemeine-SS were still part-time only. Regular Allgemeine-SS personnel were also not exempt from conscription and many were called up to serve in the Wehrmacht. By 1942, most of the part time Allgemeine-SS had either joined the Waffen-SS or had been conscripted into the regular German military. The senior levels of the Abschnitte and Oberabschnitte were considered draft exempt, but most of these SS leaders and staff were themselves merged into the offices of the SS and Police Leaders which were considered as quasi-military commands with Waffen-SS authority, although on paper still part of the Allgemeine-SS. Draft exemption for these senior leadership staffs was itself lifted in 1944, and most of the remaining Allgemeine-SS personnel were assigned to the Waffen-SS as reservists. Security forces From 1936, the state security police forces of the Gestapo and Kripo (Criminal Police) were consolidated and placed under the central command of Reinhard Heydrich, already chief of the party ''Sicherheitsdienst'' (SD), and named Sicherheitspolizei. Later from 27 September 1939 forward, they were all folded into the Reich Main Security Office (RSHA) (RSHA) which was placed under Heydrich's control. The ordinary uniformed German police, known as the Ordnungspolizei (Orpo) were also under SS control after 1936 but never incorporated into the Allgemeine-SS, although many police members were also dual SS members. The death squad units of the Einsatzgruppen were considered part of the Allgemeine-SS and under the operational control of the RSHA. The units were themselves a mixture of civilian (SS auxiliary), police, and SS personnel, although all Einsatzgruppen personnel wore grey Waffen-SS type uniforms in the performance of their duties. During World War II, security force personnel were seen as performing "essential duties" to the Reich and thus were exempt from conscription into military service. Many such personnel, however, typically joined the Waffen-SS or served in the Wehrmacht military reserve. SS-Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann, for instance, was an Untersturmführer in the Waffen-SS Reserve while Lieutenant Colonel Herbert Kappler was a Reserve Feldwebel (Sergeant) in the German Army. As Germany began losing World War II, the draft exemption for security forces was slowly lifted, although due to the nature of the Nazi regime, there was a constant need for security personnel up until the very end of the Third Reich. For this reason, many Gestapo, SD, and Kripo members who served as reservists never saw combat until the very last days of the war, if at all. Concentration camp personnel All Concentration Camp staffs were originally part of the Allgemeine-SS under the office of the Concentration Camps Inspectorate (Inspektion der Konzentrationslager or IKL). First headed by Theodor Eicke, the Concentration Camps were formed into the Totenkopfverbände after 1934, but then increasingly became divided into the camp service proper and the military Totenkopf formation controlled by the SS-Verfungstruppe (the early Waffen-SS). After 1942, the entire camp service was placed under the authority of the Waffen-SS for a variety of administrative and logistical reasons. The ultimate command authority for the camp system during World War II was the SS-Wirtschafts-Verwaltungshauptamt (WHVA). Other units By late 1940 the Allgemeine-SS also controlled the ''Germanische SS (Germanic SS)'', which were collaborationist organizations modeled after the Allgemeine-SS in several Western European countries. The Allgemeine-SS also consisted of a female volunteer corps (known as the SS-Helferinnen) and, in the last days of World War II, had authority over the so-called "Auxiliary-SS" which were non-SS personnel conscripted in the SS to serve as concentration camp personnel in the last months of World War II. Ranks The ranks (Ranks and insignia of the Schutzstaffel) of the Allgemeine SS and the Waffen-SS were based upon those of the SA and used the same titles. However, there was a distinctly separate hierarchical subdivisions of the larger Waffen-SS from its Allgemeine counterpart and an SS member could in fact hold two separate SS ranks. For instance, a ''Brigadeführer'' ("Brigadier General") of the Allgemeine SS equivalent to a ''Generalmajor'' might only be ranked as a ''Rottenführer'' ("Lance Corporal") in the Waffen-SS. If this same SS member were an architectural engineer (Architectural engineering), then the SS-HA would issue a third rank of ''Sonderführer'' ("Lead Technical Specialist"). SS members could also hold reserve commissions in the regular military as well as a Nazi Party political rank (Ranks and insignia of the Nazi Party). Add to this that many senior SS members were also employees of the Federal government in capacities as ministers, deputies, etc., and an SS member could in the end have as many as five ranks in various organizations as well as a number of additional titles. Per one SS historian: ''Multiple and overlapping commands were very commonplace... A man could hold one post while temporarily assigned to another and hold rank in the Allgemeine-SS, Waffen-SS and Polizei simultaneously... I'm thoroughly convinced even Berlin was not 100% sure who was in certain positions at exact points in time, confirmed by individual BDC records.'' - Mark Yerger, ''Allgemeine-SS'' Yerger, p. 10. Yerger attempted to list all HSSPF, SSPF, Oberabschnitt, Abschnitt, and Standarten of the SS, plus maps, photos, and mini-biographies. The BDC (the Berlin Document Center) a US managed collection of captured Nazi documents in Berlin, was one of his sources. The collection is now part of the German Bundesarchiv. In 1944, nearly every SS general was granted equivalent Waffen-SS rank, without regard to previous military service. This was mainly ordered so to give SS-generals authority over military units and POW camps. Also, in the event of capture by the Allies (Allies of World War II), SS-Generals would be given status as military prisoners rather than captured police officials. This distinction was observed by British and American forces in the West, but hardly ever even noticed by the Soviet Red Army, in particular in situations where SS and Police Leaders or other SS units involved in genocide, would fall into Soviet hands. Friedrich Jecklen, who was granted Waffen-SS rank in 1944, was captured by the Russians and held as a criminal with no status given to his military rank. Total manpower In 1945, the stated membership number of SS was over 840,000 members. Of these, 48,500 were members of the Allgemeine SS. Much of the remainder were 18,000 officers, 52,000 NCOs, and 600,000 enlisted members of the Waffen-SS and 130,000 police. Order of Battle ) (VOMI) an organization charged with settling ethnic Germans in the German Reich (Nazi Germany) from other parts of Europe.


actions quot

!" — naval command; "All hands, abandon ship!" * Allgemeine SS — "General SS", general main body of the Schutzstaffel made up of the full-time administrative, security, intelligence and police branches of the SS as well as the broader part-time membership which turned out for parades, rallies and "street actions" such as ''Kristallnacht''; also comprised reserve and honorary members. * Alte Hasen — "Old hares"; slang for military veterans who survived front-line hardships. Richard Schulze was born in Berlin-Spandau (Spandau (locality)). A year after graduating from gymnasium in 1934, the 20-year-old Schulze entered the Allgemeine SS and was assigned to 6.SS-Standarte in Berlin. In November 1934, he joined Adolf Hitler's personal bodyguard regiment - Leibstandarte-SS ''Adolf Hitler'' (Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler) and between 1935 and 1937 took various officer training courses at the SS-Junkerschule (Junker (SS rank)) Bad Tölz, in Jüterbog and Dachau. In 1937, Richard Schulze was reassigned to the 3.SS-Totenkopf-Standarte “Thüringen” where he served as an adjutant to Theodor Eicke. Later on he worked in the same role at the SS-Hauptamt for August Heißmeyer and the Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop before rejoining the Leibstandarte (Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler) in February 1940. He is pictured standing with Molotov, Ribbentrop, Stalin, and Soviet Chief of Staff Shaposnikov at the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of August 23, 1939 Personnel from Dachau then went on to work at Sachsenhausen (Sachsenhausen (detention camp)) and Oranienburg, where Eicke established his central office. In 1935 Dachau became the training center for the concentration camps service. Many of the early recruits came from the ranks of the SA (Sturmabteilung) and ''Allgemeine SS''. Senior roles were filled by personnel from the German police service (Ordnungspolizei). On 29 March 1936, concentration camp guards and administration units were officially designated as the ''SS-Totenkopfverbände''. Gebhardt eventually rose to the rank of ''Gruppenführer'' in the ''Allgemeine SS'' and a Major General (''Generalmajor'') in the ''Waffen SS''. During World War II, Gebhardt also acted for some time as the President of the German Red Cross. Returning to Germany in 1939, Dirlewanger was granted admission to the ''Allgemeine SS'' and given the rank of ''SS-Untersturmführer''. Berger organized the creation of an elite Communist-hunting military unit which would include some men convicted of poaching. The company came under the command of ex-Allgemeine SS Standartenführer Günter d'Alquen. Upon his transfer to the Waffen-SS, d'Alquen was given the rank of ''Waffen-SS Hauptsturmführer der Reserve''. d'Alquen would command the unit throughout its existence, ending the war as an ''Waffen-SS Standartenführer der Reserve''. After a month's sick leave, Strachwitz was recalled to active duty and promoted to ''Generalmajor der Reserve'' (Major General), and was placed in command of the 1st Panzer Division, though for a short period only. During this time, Strachwitz was also given the rank of SS-Brigadeführer und General der SS (Brigadeführer). ) (VOMI) an organization charged with settling ethnic Germans in the German Reich (Nazi Germany) from other parts of Europe.


active

Workers Party NSDAP . It was considered to be an elite organization by both party members and the general population. The main task of the SS was the personal protection of the Führer of the Nazi Party, Adolf Hitler. As early as the winter of 1925 the SS consisted of approximately 1,000 members, but of this number there were barely 200 active members. Heinrich Himmler tried to separate the SS from the SA, and SA leaders generally had no authority over SS personnel from 1927

onwards. Himmler began to systematically develop and expand the SS with stricter requirements for members as well as a general purge of SS members who were identified as drunkards, criminals, or otherwise undesirable for service in the SS. By December 1929, the number of active SS members had grown to 1,000. As the SS grew even further, Himmler on 29 January 1930 announced to SA leader Ernst Röhm, that: The Schutzstaffel is growing, and will probably number 2,000 by the end

alcoholics , homosexuals (Homosexuality), or of uncertain racial status. This "house cleaning" removed some 60,000 SS members by December 1935. By 1938, the Allgemeine SS numbered 485,000 members with 13,867 active SS-officers. In May 1939, the Totenkopfverbände was declared to be a part of the Allgemeine-SS, adding 50,000 new members to the organization (the Totenkopfverbände would later be absorbed by the Waffen-SS in 1942). Upon the outbreak of World War II in 1939, the SS had


time+membership

!" — naval command; "All hands, abandon ship!" * Allgemeine SS — "General SS", general main body of the Schutzstaffel made up of the full-time administrative, security, intelligence and police branches of the SS as well as the broader part-time membership which turned out for parades, rallies and "street actions" such as ''Kristallnacht''; also comprised reserve and honorary members. * Alte Hasen — "Old hares"; slang for military veterans who


membership number

, but hardly ever even noticed by the Soviet Red Army, in particular in situations where SS and Police Leaders or other SS units involved in genocide, would fall into Soviet hands. Friedrich Jecklen, who was granted Waffen-SS rank in 1944, was captured by the Russians and held as a criminal with no status given to his military rank. Total manpower In 1945, the stated membership number of SS was over 840,000 members. Of these, 48,500 were members of the Allgemeine SS. Much

Reserve''. After a month's sick leave, Strachwitz was recalled to active duty and promoted to ''Generalmajor der Reserve'' (Major General), and was placed in command of the 1st Panzer Division, though for a short period only. During this time, Strachwitz was also given the rank of SS-Brigadeführer und General der SS (Brigadeführer). ) (VOMI) an organization charged with settling ethnic Germans in the German Reich (Nazi Germany) from other parts of Europe.

Allgemeine SS

The '''Allgemeine SS''' ("General SS") was the most numerous branch of the Schutzstaffel (SS) paramilitary forces of Nazi Germany. It was managed by the SS-Hauptamt ( ). The Allgemeine SS was officially established in the autumn of 1934 to distinguish its members from the SS-Verfügungstruppe (which later became the Waffen-SS) and the SS-Totenkopfverbände (concentration camp guards (Nazi concentration camps)).

Starting in 1939, foreign units of the Allgemeine SS were raised in occupied countries. They were later consolidated into the ''Leitstelle der germanischen SS'' ( ) from 1940.

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