Al-Majdal, Tiberias

What is Al-Majdal, Tiberias known for?


stone quot

al-namla'', "the ant´s stone." At the time of the 1922 census of Palestine, Majdal had a population of 210 Muslims, increasing to 284 Muslims living in 62 houses by the 1931 census (1931 census of Palestine). Barron, 1923, Table XI Mills, 1932, p.


922

was apparently ordered by 12th Battalion headquarters (Ben-Zion, Kirchner and Ben-Aryeh, "Summary of meeting with Yitzhak Brochi..... 13 March IDFA 922\75\\943.) Cited in Morris, 2004, p. 186, 275 Al-Majdal was subsequently bulldozed by the Israelis in 1948. The Jewish settlement of Migdal (Migdal, Israel) was established in 1910-1911 on land purchased by Russian Zionists (Zionism), northwest of the village of Al


centuries local

of the village on the summit of the mountains, lay the remains of the Crusader (Crusades) fortress of Magdala (later known as ''Qal'at Na'la'' ("the fortress of Na'la"). On the lakeshore about south of the village, there was a perforated black stone that is mentioned by Arab travellers in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Local belief held that the holes in the rock were caused by ants having eaten through it, and for this reason it was called ''hajar


temple period

was covered with purple and green cloth. From her visits there in the 1980s and 1990s, Jane Schaeberg also describes the site, noting it is marked by a rusty road sign indicating that, "this was the birthplace of Mary Magdelene, a city that flourished toward the end of the second temple period, and one of the cities fortified by Joseph ben Matityahu (Josephus) during the great revolt of the Jews against the Romans." Schaeberg, 2004


white blue

a Byzantine (Byzantine Empire) era monastery near the sea. The excavations were hindered by the water from underground springs, as well as the destruction wrought by the bulldozing of the Arab village which pushed many ancient artifacts towards the sea. The mosaic of the Byzantine monastery was badly damaged, though part of the geometric and cross design of red, white, blue and ash-coloured stones could still


ancient place

name WK1992 Etymology The Arabic (Arabic language) name Majdal means "tower" and preserves the ancient place name (Place names of Palestine) Magdala. Porter, 2005, p. 91. Magdala was also known in ancient times as Migdal (Hebrew (Hebrew language)), and the Aramaic (Aramaic language) names ascribed to it are Magdala Nunaya (also, Migdal Nunnaya or Nunayah; "Tower of Fish") and Magdala Tza'baya (or Migdal Seb'iya; "Magdala of the dyers" or "Tower of Dyers"). Murphy-O'Connor, 2008, p. 239. Schaeberg, 2004, p. 47. It is referred to by these Aramaic names in the Babylonian Talmud (b. Pesah. 46b) and Jerusalem Talmud (y. Ta'an. 4.8.) respectively. Also known in Greek (Ancient Greek) as Magdala Taricheae ("Magdala of the fish salters"), likely due to the town's famed fish-curing industry, Josephus writes of it simply as Taricheae (Ant. 14.20; 20. 159; J.W. 1. 180; 2. 252). Kregel Carta, 1999, p. 21. The Magadan mentioned in Matthew 15:39 and the Dalmanutha of Mark 8:10 are likely corrupt forms of Magdal (Magdala) and Magdal Nuna (Magdala Nunaya). Matthew 15:39 places "the region of Magdala ... in the country of the Philistines." See Savage-Smith and van Gelder, 2005, p. 119. Mary Magdalene's surname as transcribed in the gospels is said to be derived from Magdala as her home and place of birth. Hastings, 2004, p. 97. Alfred Edersheim cites the Talmud as evidence for this naming practice, which describes several Rabbis as 'Magdalene' or residents of Magdala. Majdal and Majdalani ("of Majdal") are common place name (Place names of Palestine)s and family names in the Syria-Palestine. MacAdam, 1986, p. 124. Examples of such place names include Al-Majdal, Askalan), Majdal Yaba, and Al-Mujaydil (depopulated Palestinian villages located in modern day Israel), Majdal Shams (a Syrian-Druze village in the Golan Heights), Majdal Bani Fadil (in the West Bank) and Majdal Anjar (in modern day Lebanon). Israel, 1979, p. 203. History thumb left 250px A map of the Tiberias region indicating the location of Al-Majdal published in 1880 by the Palestine Exploration Fund (File:TiberiasRegion1870s.jpg) Josephus, in his extensive accounts of the military history of Taricheae, he relates that Cassius (Gaius Cassius Longinus), the governor of Syria between 53 and 51 BCE, attacked the city and took 30,000 men into slavery. During the time Josephus was the head of the Galilean revolutionaries' army (66 - c. 70 CE), he tells of fortifying the city which served as his headquarters and counting 40,000 men from within it among his supporters. Josephus also recounts imprisoning 600 members of the Roman council at Tiberias in Taricheae, which served as a Zealot stronghold until it fell to Romans in 67 CE. Also recorded are the deaths of 6,700 Jews in the battle with Vespasian's army in 67 CE, and the fate of 1,200 more who had surrendered, and were then led out to the stadium in Tiberias where they were executed. Another 6,000 youths were sent away to Nero and 30,400 were sold into slavery, save those who were given as a present to Agrippa (Agrippa II). Included in the territory of Agrippa II by Nero, following his death, it was attached to the Roman province of Judaea (Iudaea Province). Schaeberg, 2004, pp. 56-57. Gustav Dalman writes of Magdala that, "it was the most important city on the western bank of the lake, contributing a wagon-load of taxes ... until Herod Antipas raised up a rival on the lake by building Tiberias." Magdala is also described as "the capital of a toparchy", and is compared to Sepphoris and Tiberias in that it had "administrative apparatus and personnel," though not to the same extent. Schaeberg, 2004, p. 58. The remains of a Roman-period synagogue dated to between 50 BCE and 100 CE were discovered in 2009. The walls of the Category:Ancient villages in Israel Category:Ancient synagogues in the Land of Israel Category:Archaeological sites in Israel Category:Arab villages depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War Category:Biblical places Category:New Testament places Category:District of Tiberias * Magdala Gadar—One Magdala was in the east, on the River Yarmouk (Yarmouk River) near Gadara (in the Middle Ages "Jadar", now Umm Qais), thus acquiring the name Magdala Gadar. * Magdala Nunayya—There was another, better-known Magdala near Tiberias, Magdala Nunayya ("Magdala of the fishes"), which would locate it on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. Al-Majdal (Al-Majdal, Tiberias), a Palestinian (Palestinian people) Arab (Arab people) village depopulated in the lead up to the 1948 Arab-Israeli war (1948 Arab–Israeli War) was identified as the site of this Magdala. The modern Israeli municipality of Migdal (Migdal (town)) (Khirbet Medjdel), founded in 1910 and about 6 km NNW of Tiberias, has expanded into the area of the former village.


668

, Published by J. Murray, 668 pages. * *Conder, Claude Reignier (Claude Reignier Conder) and H.H. Kitchener (Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener) (1881): '' The Survey of Western Palestine: memoirs of the topography, orography, hydrography


important agricultural

PalestineCensus1931.pdf 83 The village economy was based on agriculture, vegetables and grain were the most important agricultural products. In 1944-45, cultivated lands in the village included 24 dunams used for growing citrus and bananas, and 41 dunums devoted to cereals. Another 17 dunams were irrigated or used for orchards. Hadawi, 1970,


title studies

author Kregel Carta edition Illustrated publisher Kregel Publications year 1999 isbn 978-0-8254-2376-5 url http: books.google.com ?id LCdqLoGsHpMC&pg PA21&dq magdala+nunaya+tiberias&q * Category:Ancient villages in Israel Category:Ancient synagogues in the Land of Israel Category:Archaeological sites in Israel Category:Arab villages depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War Category:Biblical places Category:New Testament places Category:District of Tiberias * Magdala Gadar—One Magdala was in the east, on the River Yarmouk (Yarmouk River) near Gadara (in the Middle Ages "Jadar", now Umm Qais), thus acquiring the name Magdala Gadar. * Magdala Nunayya—There was another, better-known Magdala near Tiberias, Magdala Nunayya ("Magdala of the fishes"), which would locate it on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. Al-Majdal (Al-Majdal, Tiberias), a Palestinian (Palestinian people) Arab (Arab people) village depopulated in the lead up to the 1948 Arab-Israeli war (1948 Arab–Israeli War) was identified as the site of this Magdala. The modern Israeli municipality of Migdal (Migdal (town)) (Khirbet Medjdel), founded in 1910 and about 6 km NNW of Tiberias, has expanded into the area of the former village.


black stone

of the village on the summit of the mountains, lay the remains of the Crusader (Crusades) fortress of Magdala (later known as ''Qal'at Na'la'' ("the fortress of Na'la"). On the lakeshore about Category:Ancient villages in Israel Category:Ancient synagogues in the Land of Israel Category:Archaeological sites in Israel Category:Arab villages depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War Category:Biblical places Category:New Testament places Category:District of Tiberias * Magdala Gadar—One Magdala was in the east, on the River Yarmouk (Yarmouk River) near Gadara (in the Middle Ages "Jadar", now Umm Qais), thus acquiring the name Magdala Gadar. * Magdala Nunayya—There was another, better-known Magdala near Tiberias, Magdala Nunayya ("Magdala of the fishes"), which would locate it on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. Al-Majdal (Al-Majdal, Tiberias), a Palestinian (Palestinian people) Arab (Arab people) village depopulated in the lead up to the 1948 Arab-Israeli war (1948 Arab–Israeli War) was identified as the site of this Magdala. The modern Israeli municipality of Migdal (Migdal (town)) (Khirbet Medjdel), founded in 1910 and about 6 km NNW of Tiberias, has expanded into the area of the former village.

Al-Majdal, Tiberias

'''Al-Majdal''' ( It is identified with the site of the ancient town of '''Magdala''', reputed to be the birthplace of Mary Magdalene. Pringle, 1998, p.28. Josephus recounts military battles there between his forces and those of Vespasian's army, and archaeological excavations indicate it was an important city on the Sea of Galilee around the time of the rule of Herod Antipas.

Christian (Christianity) pilgrims wrote of their visits to see the house and church (Church (building)) of Mary Magdalene from the 6th century onward, but little is known about the village in the Mamluk and early Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) period, indicating it was likely small or uninhabited. In the 19th century, Western travellers interested in the biblical history of Palestine documented their observations of Al-Majdal, generally describing it as a very small and poor Muslim (Islam) village. In 1910-11, Russian Zionists founded Migdal (Migdal, Israel) adjacent to Al-Majdal. Just prior to the outbreak of the 1948 Arab-Israeli war, Al-Majdal was depopulated and then largely destroyed. The Israeli town of Migdal has since expanded onto part of the village's former lands.

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