Al-Bassa

What is Al-Bassa known for?


406

; The site was used in 1189 C.E. as a Crusader encampment during a military campaign, Abu Shama, RHC Or, IV, p.406 mode 1up 406. Cited in Petersen, 2001, p. 111 and a document dated October 1200 recorded the sale of the village by King Amalric II of Jerusalem to the Teutonic Order. Strehlke, 1869, pp. 30-31, No.38. Cited in Petersen


books year

refugees : essays in memory of Edward W. Said (1935-2003) first1 Nur last1 Masalha authorlink1 Nur Masalha first2 Edward W. last2 Said authorlink2 Edward Said publisher Zed Books year 2005 isbn 978-1-84277-623-0 postscript . *


book

, and a public elementary school for girls. Hassoun, 2003, p. 26. British Mandate era The Franco-British boundary agreement (Paulet–Newcombe Agreement) of 1920 described an imprecisely defined boundary between Lebanon and Palestine. It appeared to pass close to the north of al-Bassa, leaving the village on the Palestinian side but cut off from much of its lands.

(p.

PA333 333 ) *Cohen, A. (1973), ''Palestine in the Eighteenth Century: Patters of Government and Administration.'' Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Cited in Khalidi, (1992) *


century year

Illustrated publisher MSU Press year 2003 isbn 978-0-87013-667-2 postscript . * *


physical+character

H.B. authorlink Henry Baker Tristram year 1865 url http: archive.org details landisraelajour01trisgoog title Land of Israel, A Journal of travel in Palestine, undertaken with special reference to its physical character location London publisher Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge *


military campaign

; The site was used in 1189 C.E. as a Crusader encampment during a military campaign, Abu Shama, RHC Or, IV, p. 406. Cited in Petersen, 2001, p. 111 and a document dated October 1200 recorded the sale of the village by King Amalric II of Jerusalem to the Teutonic Order. Strehlke, 1869, pp. 30-31, No.38. Cited in Petersen


706'

pages 685–706 Meanwhile, a joint British-French boundary commission was working to determine a precise border, making many adjustments in the process. By February 1922 it had determined a border that confirmed al-Bassa as being in Palestine. This became official in 1923. The citizenship of the residents was changed to Palestinian in 1926. In 1922, the people of al-Bassa founded a local council which


national high

, installed a system of running water, and oversaw the convening of a wholesale produce market there every Sunday. An agricultural cooperative in the village counted over 150 members that promoted agricultural development, while also providing loans to local farmers. The population of about 4,000 was divided almost evenly between Muslims and Christians. Among the village institutions were a government run elementary school, a "National High School", a Greek Orthodox church, a Catholic


important public

grown to 1360 Muslims and 1590 Christians by 1945. Government of Palestine, Village Statistics, 1945, p. 2 The 1938 camp of Jewish labourers and Notrim (police) for construction of Tegart's wall was located adjacent to the village, and it ultimately became the site of a Tegart fort. By 1945 the village had grown to 3,100 and was home to a regional college. Important public structures at the time of its existence included two mosques, two churches, three schools and 18 other shrines both holy to Muslims and Christians. Al-Bassa was the only Palestinian village in the Galilee with a Christian high school. Mansour, 2004, p. 220. Some of Bassa's former public structures have been preserved and are found today within the Israeli localities of Shlomi (Shlomi, Israel) and Betzet. 1938 massacre In 1938, during the 1936–1939 Arab revolt in Palestine, the village was the scene of a massacre committed by British soldiers. On September 6, 1938, four soldiers of the Royal Ulster Rifles (RUR) were killed when their armoured car ran over a land mine near the village. In retaliation, British forces burnt the village down. After that, perhaps a few days later, about 50 Arabs from the village were collected by the RUR and some attached Royal Engineers. Some who tried to run away were shot. Then, according to British testimony, the remainder were put onto a bus which was forced to drive over a land mine laid by the soldiers, destroying the bus and killing many of the occupants. The village's inhabitants were then forced to dig a pit and throw all the bodies into it. Arab accounts added torture and other brutality. The total death toll was about 20. Hughes, M. (2009) The Banality of Brutality: British Armed Forces and the Repression of the Arab Revolt in Palestine, 1936–39, ''English Historical Review'' Vol. CXXIV No. 507, 314–354. 1948 and aftermath 200px right thumb The church in al-Bassa in 2008 (Image:Bassa church back.jpg) Al-Bassa was one of the largest, most developed villages in the north of the country, covering a land area of some 20,000 dunams of hills and plains, 2,000 of which were irrigated. A regional commercial center, it contained over sixty shops and eleven coffeehouses, a few of which sat along the Haifa-Beirut highway. The active village council had paved roads, installed a system of running water, and oversaw the convening of a wholesale produce market there every Sunday. An agricultural cooperative in the village counted over 150 members that promoted agricultural development, while also providing loans to local farmers. The population of about 4,000 was divided almost evenly between Muslims and Christians. Among the village institutions were a government run elementary school, a "National High School", a Greek Orthodox church, a Catholic church, and a mosque. The village was situated in the territory allotted to the Arab state under the 1947 UN Partition Plan. It was captured by Yishuv's Haganah forces during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, in Operation Ben-Ami, on May 14, 1948. Al-Bassa's defenders were local militia men. Following its capture, the Haganah's Palmach forces concentrated the villagers in the local church where they shot and killed a number of youths before chasing the villagers out. Quigley, 2005, p. 62. One witness to the expulsion said that it was preceded by soldiers shooting and killing five villagers inside the church, while another said seven villagers were shot and killed by soldiers outside the church. Benvenisti, 2000, pp. 139 - 140. Al-Bassa was completely destroyed by the Israelis with the exception of a few houses, a church, and a Muslim shrine, still standing today. At least 60 of the Christian villagers of Al-Bassa were taken by the Haganah to Mazra'a, where they remained for more than a year.


978'

(p.

gazetteer first1 Salomon E. last1 Grootkerk edition Illustrated publisher BRILL year 2000 isbn 978-90-04-11535-4 * *

Illustrated publisher MSU Press year 2003 isbn 978-0-87013-667-2 postscript . * *

Al-Bassa

'''al-Bassa'''' ( above sea level.

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