Akron, Ohio

What is Akron, Ohio known for?


sports related

Stadium . The city's failure to win a trophy (Drought (sport)) in any major professional sport since 1964 has earned it a reputation of being a cursed sports (sports-related curses) city, which ESPN validated by proclaiming Cleveland as its "most tortured sports city" in 2004.


time finishing

the highest quality theatre of its time. Finishing their training in 1927, she was hired by Theresa Helburn, the Guild's Executive Director, as a casting secretary. She then worked her way through various backstage jobs, including assistant stage manager, to assistant to the “Board of Managers,” an importantant administrative job. Crawford, Cheryl, One Naked Individual, Bobbs-Merril, New York, 1977 While working at the Guild, she met Harold Clurman and Lee Strasberg who


book shows

performing at small bars in town, but realized he would not be able to book shows in other cities without a demo (demo (music)). To record one, he asked for the help of Carney, who agreed to provide the recording equipment and allow his basement to be used, while Auerbach would recruit the other musicians. However, none of Auerbach's backing band showed up on the recording date, as they would "rather get stoned and play video games than come to rehearsal


breaking+local

up by the AP, one of the conditions of membership, is that the AP is entitled to exclusive rights to distribute breaking local news. So if a plane crashes in Seattle, the AP could pick up everything the Post-Intelligencer and the Times wrote and every AP subscriber would be free to use it. This does not apply to where a paper's bureaus elsewhere break a story, investigative reports, columns, reviews, and the like. (Thought syndication deals often exist for this material, just not through


association local

sports teams include the Akron RubberDucks (Minor League Baseball), Akron Racers (National Pro Fastpitch), and Rubber City Rollergirls (Roller Derby) (Women's Flat Track Derby Association). Local sporting facilities include Canal Park (Canal Park (Akron, Ohio)), Firestone Stadium, InfoCision Stadium – Summa Field, James A. Rhodes Arena, and the Lee Jackson Field (Lee R. Jackson Baseball Field). The RubberDucks have won the Eastern League Championship


life growing

States U.S. writer of nonfiction and memoirs whose most recent memoir, ''Goosetown: Reconstructing an Akron Neighborhood'', tells the story of the author's attempt to remember the first five years of her life growing up in an ethnic neighborhood in Akron called Old Wolf Ledge (known to residents as "Goosetown"), famous for its glacial formations, breweries, and cereal mills. ''Goosetown'' is the prequel to ''Gum-Dipped: A Daughter Remembers Rubber Town'', her book about the decades when Akron was the Rubber Capital of the World. In it Dyer provides a loving but complicated portrait of her father and a view of the relationships among Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, its employees, and the city of Akron (Akron, Ohio), Ohio. An earlier memoir was ''In a Tangled Wood: An Alzheimer's Journey'', and she has also edited a collection of essays about place by Appalachian women writers, ''Bloodroot''. Her first book, titled '''''The Awakening''': A Novel of Beginnings'', was a scholarly study of Kate Chopin, a turn-of-the-century American writer. Joyce Dyer is John S. Kenyon Professor of English at Hiram College in Hiram, Ohio. At Hiram she won the Vencl-Carr Award for Teaching Excellence in 2006, the Michael Starr Award for Teaching Excellence in 1996, and a Paul E. Martin Merit Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, and 2010. Her biography is included in ''Contemporary Authors'', volume 146, and in the New Revision Series, volume 91. Background Joyce Coyne (Dyer) was born in Akron (Akron, Ohio), Ohio, during the summer of 1947. Her father, Thomas Coyne, was a supervisor for the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, and his experiences inspired Dyer to write ''Gum-Dipped: A Daughter Remembers Rubber Town,'' the 2004 required summer reading selection for the University of Akron and 2005 required reading for Hiram College. Dyer’s mother was a clerk for the Board of Education in Akron. Dyer graduated with a B.A. in English from Wittenberg University and a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University. She has taught at Lake Forest College in Illinois and Western Reserve Academy and Hiram College in Ohio. In addition to publishing five books, she is the author of numerous literary essays that have appeared in magazines such as ''North American Review'', ''cream city review'', and ''High Plains Literary Review'' and in anthologies such as ''After the Bell'', ''Body Outlaws'', ''We All Live Downstream'', ''What's Normal?'', and ''Educating the Imagination''. She has read and lectured at St. Mary's College of Maryland, the Mercantile Library in Cincinnati, Otterbein College, Mount Union College, Appalachian State University, Wittenberg University, and the Great Lakes Writers Festival in Sheboygan, Wisconsin (2011) and served on staff at 826michigan Writers Conference in Ann Arbor, Michigan (2011), the Antioch Writers' Workshop in Yellow Springs, Ohio, the Appalachian Writers Workshop in Hindman, Kentucky, the Wright State University Institute on Writing and Teaching in Dayton, Ohio, and the Highland Summer Conference in Radford, Virginia. She recently served as visiting writer in creative nonfiction for the Northeast Ohio Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing (NEOMFA). Dyer is currently working on two collections of essays and a book about John Brown. She lives in the Ohio Western Reserve with her husband, Daniel Osborn Dyer, a book reviewer and teacher. thumb right Soapbox derby at a community celebration in Minnesota (File:SoapboxRace.jpg) In 1933, ''Dayton Daily News'' newspaper photographer Myron Scott of Dayton (Dayton, Ohio), Ohio had covered a race of boy-built cars in his home community and was so taken with the idea that he acquired rights to the event; the national-scale Soap Box Derby grew out of this idea. In 1934, Scott had managed to persuade fifty cities across the United States to hold soap box car races and send a champion each to Dayton for a major race, later held in Akron (Akron, Ohio). Scott later went on to work for Chevrolet. Scott was so enthusiastic with the whole concept that he acquired its copyright; the national-scale Soap Box Derby grew out of this idea. In 1934, Scott managed to persuade 50 cities across the United States to hold soap box car races and send a champion each to Dayton for a major race, a proposal that Chevrolet subsequently sponsored in 1935. The race was later held at Talmadge Hill in Akron (Akron, Ohio), Ohio. Event Promotion In August 2006 Coondog co-hosted the The National Hamburger Festival in Akron, Ohio. The festival was held to honor local food innovators, Frank and Charles Menches, who claimed to have invented the hamburger in 1885. The festival included a hamburger eating contest, which O'Karma won, by eating 4 and 1 2 double decker hamburgers in 8 minutes. Personal life Coondog was born in Akron, Ohio and was raised in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. He attended Kent State High School where he was a varsity swimmer. Horsemen of the Esophagus by Jason Fagone, 64. (ISBN 0-30723738-9) Coondog later attended Kent State University has worked as a painter and construction contractor. Horsemen of the Esophagus by Jason Fagone, 70. (ISBN 0-30723738-9) He is married with two children. *Interstate 76 (Interstate 76 (east)) heading westbound out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, uses Valley Forge (Valley Forge, Pennsylvania), a historic but minor locality where I-76 joins the Pennsylvania Turnpike. *Interstate 76 (Interstate 76 (east)) westbound in the Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) area uses "Ohio and West" on overhead signs. I-76 (The Pennsylvania Turnpike) continues into Ohio as the Ohio Turnpike, where it meets I-80 and leaves the Turnpike while I-80 joins the Turnpike. This means that Youngstown, Ohio, Akron, Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio, and Toledo, Ohio (all control cities) are appropriate for I-76 westbound. Cleveland is used once in Pennsylvania as a control city for the Ohio Turnpike, as is Columbus, Ohio (for Interstate 70). Media:76-junction-70.JPG *Interstate 77 in North Carolina uses Fort Chiswell, Virginia as a control city north of Statesville. Fort Chiswell is an unincorporated town that was chosen because it is the nearest community to I-77's junction with Interstate 81. Bliss was an Akron, Ohio native and 1935 graduate of the University of Akron where he was initiated as a member of Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. Bliss is the namesake of the Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Politics established in 1986 at the University of Akron to promote citizen knowledge and participation in the political process, values in which Bliss strongly believed. Bliss served over nine years on the University of Akron Board of Trustees and was chair of the board at the time of his death. McLean was born as '''Eugene Joseph Huth''' in Akron, Ohio. In addition to his work for Marlboro, McLean also starred as the title character in the short-lived 1960 television series, ''Tate (Tate (TV series))'', and appeared in numerous television series and feature films in the 1960s and '70s. He appeared in the TV series ''Laramie'' twice, first in 1962 in the episode "A Grave For Cully Brown" as Cully Brown, Classic TV Archive, U. S. Western series and in 1963 as Marshal Branch McGary, in the episode "The Marshals." Classic TV Archive, U. S. Western series In 1966 he appeared in an episode of the long running western ''The Virginian (The Virginian (TV series))''. Profile at aol.com He later guest starred in other TV series, including ''Bonanza''. NY Times biography He was also a fine woodworker and artist. At the league meeting in Akron, Ohio on April 30 prior to the season, the Association was reorganized, with Joe Carr (Joseph Carr) of the Columbus Panhandles named as president. The Association's headquarters was moved to Columbus, Ohio, and a league constitution and by-laws were drafted, giving teams territorial rights, restricting player movements, and developing membership criteria for the franchises. The league would play under the rules of college football, and official standings were issued for the first time so that there would be a clear champion. The most notable of changes was that only games played against league teams would count toward the standings; this had the dual effect of both encouraging independent teams (such as those from the Ohio League and the NYPFL (New York Pro Football League)) to join, but also caused those that did not join to fold within a few years, because NFL teams, particularly those competing for a championship, would be much less willing to play what were effectively exhibition games against teams that would not help them in the standings. The PFW&C bought the Cleveland, Zanesville and Cincinnati Railroad by deed on July 1, 1865, making it its Akron Branch. The line ran from Hudson, Ohio on the Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad south through Akron (Akron, Ohio), crossing the PFW&C at Orrville (Orrville, Ohio) and continuing to Millersburg (Millersburg, Ohio). In 1868 a short 3.5 mile (5.5 km) extension to the south was built, and on November 4, 1869 the PFW&C sold the line to the Pittsburgh, Mt. Vernon, Columbus and London Railroad. That company later became part of the PRR's Cleveland, Akron and Cincinnati Railway. Life and career White was born as '''Jesse Marc Weidenfeld''' in Buffalo, New York, and was raised in Akron, Ohio. He made his first amateur appearance in local stage productions at the age of 15. Though aspiring to be an actor, he worked at many different jobs during the 1930s, including selling beauty supplies and lingerie. After moving to Cleveland, Ohio, Jesse began a career in vaudeville and burlesque, traveling widely before landing a role on Broadway (Broadway theatre). In 1942, White made his Broadway debut in ''The Moon is Down'', followed by a successful performance in the role of a sanitarium (Sanatorium) orderly in the popular play ''Harvey (Harvey (play))''. He would later reprise his role in the 1950 (1950 in film) film version (Harvey (film)) and the 1972 television movie. '''Jarrod Alexander Cooper''' (born March 31, 1978 in Akron, Ohio) is a former American football safety (Safety (American football position)) with the Oakland Raiders and Carolina Panthers. He was drafted by the Panthers in the fifth round of the 2001 NFL Draft. He played college football at Kansas State (Kansas State Wildcats football). - 14 align "left" Cleveland-Akron-Canton-Lorain-Elyria align "left" Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio), OH; Akron (Akron, Ohio), OH; Canton (Canton, Ohio), OH; Lorain (Lorain, Ohio)-Elyria (Elyria, Ohio), OH 2,722,194 - Biography Sanders was born in Leon, New York, where he attended the common schools, and taught school in New York. He was a nephew of Sidney Edgarton (First Montana Governor). He moved to Ohio in 1854, where he continued teaching, and studied law in Akron (Akron, Ohio), gaining admission to the bar (bar (law)) in 1856. In 1991, Ruiz de Velasco created a painting for the Playboy Collection in Chicago, Illinois. She was then asked by the curator , Jack Bolton, of the Rockefeller Collection in New York to create a piece for their collection.In 1994, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company Goodyear Corporation in Akron, Ohio held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their private executive gallery (Art gallery). In 1995, Coronado S.A. de C.V. held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their gallery in México, D.F (Mexican Federal District). '''Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens''' (70 acres) is a notable country estate (estate (land)), with gardens, located at 714 North Portage Path in Akron, Ohio. It ranks seventh on the list of largest houses in the United States. A&E, with Richard Guy Wilson, Ph.D., (2000). America's Castles: The Auto Baron Estates, ''A&E Television Network'' During his architectural career Schneider designed a number of offices, academic buildings, and residences. Perhaps his best-known work is Stan Hywet (Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens) (1915), an Akron (Akron, Ohio) mansion based on several English country houses. Aslet, Clive (2005). ''The American Country House'', p. 78. New Haven & London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300105053. His academic work includes the ornate Italian Renaissance-style Rockefeller Physics Building (1905) and Quad Hall (1925) at the Case School of Applied Science (now Case Western Reserve University), and Austin Hall at Ohio Wesleyan University. Other work includes the classical Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Building (1921), Plymouth Church (Plymouth Church of Shaker Heights) in Shaker Heights (Shaker Heights, Ohio) (1923), and the office building of the Cleveland Baseball Company at League Park. Born in Melrose, Iowa, he attended the public schools and graduated from the State University of Iowa (in 1916) and from its College of Law (University of Iowa College of Law) (in 1927). He received his LL.M. from Columbia Law School in 1928 and was a sales analyst and accountant for a rubber company in Akron, Ohio, and Dallas, Texas, in 1916 and 1917. During the First World War he served as a first lieutenant with the Thirty-fifth Infantry, United States Army, from 1917 to 1919. After the war, he continued work in the rubber industry, then became an assistant professor of military science and tactics at the University of Iowa from 1921 to 1923. He was admitted to the Iowa bar (bar (law)) in 1927 and commenced practice in Iowa City, of which he served as city solicitor from 1933 to 1935 and mayor from 1935 to 1937.


main video

. After an announcement from General Boy, there are a series of rapid fire cuts of the letters "D-E-V-O" set to the intro of the Devo song "Mechanical Man," and then the main video begins. In it, Mark Mothersbaugh plays a professor, lecturing to a class of students in surgical masks, caps, and 3-D glasses (anaglyph). As the song progresses, the class begins to riot. The film appears on ''The Complete Truth About De-Evolution''. The album was recorded in the group's hometown of Akron, Ohio in a dilapidated factory previously used by General Tire to manufacture rubber tires. The band rented the entire second floor of the building for $500 per month, dubbing their workspace "Sentient Sound". General Tire closed the factory in 1982, though space in the building was still being leased out at the time of recording. '''Jarrod Alexander Cooper''' (born March 31, 1978 in Akron, Ohio) is a former American football safety (Safety (American football position)) with the Oakland Raiders and Carolina Panthers. He was drafted by the Panthers in the fifth round of the 2001 NFL Draft. He played college football at Kansas State (Kansas State Wildcats football). - 14 align "left" Cleveland-Akron-Canton-Lorain-Elyria align "left" Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio), OH; Akron (Akron, Ohio), OH; Canton (Canton, Ohio), OH; Lorain (Lorain, Ohio)-Elyria (Elyria, Ohio), OH 2,722,194 - Biography Sanders was born in Leon, New York, where he attended the common schools, and taught school in New York. He was a nephew of Sidney Edgarton (First Montana Governor). He moved to Ohio in 1854, where he continued teaching, and studied law in Akron (Akron, Ohio), gaining admission to the bar (bar (law)) in 1856. In 1991, Ruiz de Velasco created a painting for the Playboy Collection in Chicago, Illinois. She was then asked by the curator , Jack Bolton, of the Rockefeller Collection in New York to create a piece for their collection.In 1994, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company Goodyear Corporation in Akron, Ohio held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their private executive gallery (Art gallery). In 1995, Coronado S.A. de C.V. held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their gallery in México, D.F (Mexican Federal District). '''Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens''' (70 acres) is a notable country estate (estate (land)), with gardens, located at 714 North Portage Path in Akron, Ohio. It ranks seventh on the list of largest houses in the United States. A&E, with Richard Guy Wilson, Ph.D., (2000). America's Castles: The Auto Baron Estates, ''A&E Television Network'' During his architectural career Schneider designed a number of offices, academic buildings, and residences. Perhaps his best-known work is Stan Hywet (Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens) (1915), an Akron (Akron, Ohio) mansion based on several English country houses. Aslet, Clive (2005). ''The American Country House'', p. 78. New Haven & London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300105053. His academic work includes the ornate Italian Renaissance-style Rockefeller Physics Building (1905) and Quad Hall (1925) at the Case School of Applied Science (now Case Western Reserve University), and Austin Hall at Ohio Wesleyan University. Other work includes the classical Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Building (1921), Plymouth Church (Plymouth Church of Shaker Heights) in Shaker Heights (Shaker Heights, Ohio) (1923), and the office building of the Cleveland Baseball Company at League Park. Born in Melrose, Iowa, he attended the public schools and graduated from the State University of Iowa (in 1916) and from its College of Law (University of Iowa College of Law) (in 1927). He received his LL.M. from Columbia Law School in 1928 and was a sales analyst and accountant for a rubber company in Akron, Ohio, and Dallas, Texas, in 1916 and 1917. During the First World War he served as a first lieutenant with the Thirty-fifth Infantry, United States Army, from 1917 to 1919. After the war, he continued work in the rubber industry, then became an assistant professor of military science and tactics at the University of Iowa from 1921 to 1923. He was admitted to the Iowa bar (bar (law)) in 1927 and commenced practice in Iowa City, of which he served as city solicitor from 1933 to 1935 and mayor from 1935 to 1937.


career title

-NEC Invitational , earning in excess of €400,000. In 2002, Clarke played on both the European Tour and the PGA Tour. In the build up to the Masters, Clarke played the Shell Houston Open and finished second behind runaway winner Vijay Singh. He then played the summer on the European Tour and won his ninth career title at the Compass Group English Open, this was his third win at this event and became the first man to win the tournament three times. In 2003, Clarke had another good run at the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship, however his run was halted at the quarter final stage this time when he lost 2up to Peter Lonard. He did not have to wait much longer for more WGC success though, when he won his second WGC event at the WGC-NEC Invitational at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. Clarke wins WGC-NEC BBC Sport. Retrieved 19 July 2011. He finished four strokes ahead of Jonathan Kaye. This put Clarke as only the second player to have won more than one WGC event, the other was Tiger Woods. Clarke's run of success throughout 2001–2003 saw him miss only three cuts on the European Tour in three years and place for the third time in his career at 2nd on the European Order of Merit. Along with analysis and comment, the book is interspersed with Klosterman's memories of growing up as a heavy metal (heavy metal music) fan in Wyndmere, North Dakota, and later experiences at the University of North Dakota and in Akron, Ohio. These auto-biographical segments are the main storyline (Plot (narrative)). The subtitle of the book employs metal umlauts over the o's in "North Dakota". Such marks have been used decoratively in the names of many heavy metal bands, such as Mötley Crüe and Motörhead, both of whom are discussed in the book. - 17 Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio)-Akron (Akron, Ohio) WUAB-TV² 43 28 7 Raycom Media - After discovering that Reilly was let go from the Yankees and now works for Firestone (Firestone Tire and Rubber Company), George flies to Akron (Akron, Ohio), Ohio, sets up a meeting, and brings a tray of shrimp just to try out the jerk store line. When he says it, however, Reilly shoots back with "What's the difference? You're their all-time best seller." George, unprepared for this ends up using Kramer's line, "Yeah? Well I had sex with your wife!" He is then told that Reilly's wife is in a coma. The '''Ohio Canal''' '''Jarrod Alexander Cooper''' (born March 31, 1978 in Akron, Ohio) is a former American football safety (Safety (American football position)) with the Oakland Raiders and Carolina Panthers. He was drafted by the Panthers in the fifth round of the 2001 NFL Draft. He played college football at Kansas State (Kansas State Wildcats football). - 14 align "left" Cleveland-Akron-Canton-Lorain-Elyria align "left" Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio), OH; Akron (Akron, Ohio), OH; Canton (Canton, Ohio), OH; Lorain (Lorain, Ohio)-Elyria (Elyria, Ohio), OH 2,722,194 - Biography Sanders was born in Leon, New York, where he attended the common schools, and taught school in New York. He was a nephew of Sidney Edgarton (First Montana Governor). He moved to Ohio in 1854, where he continued teaching, and studied law in Akron (Akron, Ohio), gaining admission to the bar (bar (law)) in 1856. In 1991, Ruiz de Velasco created a painting for the Playboy Collection in Chicago, Illinois. She was then asked by the curator , Jack Bolton, of the Rockefeller Collection in New York to create a piece for their collection.In 1994, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company Goodyear Corporation in Akron, Ohio held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their private executive gallery (Art gallery). In 1995, Coronado S.A. de C.V. held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their gallery in México, D.F (Mexican Federal District). '''Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens''' (70 acres) is a notable country estate (estate (land)), with gardens, located at 714 North Portage Path in Akron, Ohio. It ranks seventh on the list of largest houses in the United States. A&E, with Richard Guy Wilson, Ph.D., (2000). America's Castles: The Auto Baron Estates, ''A&E Television Network'' During his architectural career Schneider designed a number of offices, academic buildings, and residences. Perhaps his best-known work is Stan Hywet (Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens) (1915), an Akron (Akron, Ohio) mansion based on several English country houses. Aslet, Clive (2005). ''The American Country House'', p. 78. New Haven & London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300105053. His academic work includes the ornate Italian Renaissance-style Rockefeller Physics Building (1905) and Quad Hall (1925) at the Case School of Applied Science (now Case Western Reserve University), and Austin Hall at Ohio Wesleyan University. Other work includes the classical Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Building (1921), Plymouth Church (Plymouth Church of Shaker Heights) in Shaker Heights (Shaker Heights, Ohio) (1923), and the office building of the Cleveland Baseball Company at League Park. Born in Melrose, Iowa, he attended the public schools and graduated from the State University of Iowa (in 1916) and from its College of Law (University of Iowa College of Law) (in 1927). He received his LL.M. from Columbia Law School in 1928 and was a sales analyst and accountant for a rubber company in Akron, Ohio, and Dallas, Texas, in 1916 and 1917. During the First World War he served as a first lieutenant with the Thirty-fifth Infantry, United States Army, from 1917 to 1919. After the war, he continued work in the rubber industry, then became an assistant professor of military science and tactics at the University of Iowa from 1921 to 1923. He was admitted to the Iowa bar (bar (law)) in 1927 and commenced practice in Iowa City, of which he served as city solicitor from 1933 to 1935 and mayor from 1935 to 1937.


religious work

, with branches to Canton, Massillon, Dover, New Philadelphia, Uhrichsville, and Dennison. The first gas from the pipeline burned in Akron on May 10, 1899. After receiving the A.M. degree from Wittenberg College (Now Wittenberg University) in Springfield, Ohio, in 1903, Douglas was ordained in the Lutheran ministry. He served in pastorates in North Manchester, Indiana, Lancaster, Ohio, and Washington, D.C.. From 1911 to 1915, he was director of religious work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The next six years, he was minister of ''The First Congregational Church'' in Ann Arbor, Michigan, from there moving to Akron, Ohio, and serving as the Sr. Minister of the First Congregational Church of Akron from 1920 - 1926 then to Los Angeles, California and finally to the St. James United Church at Montreal, Quebec, from which pulpit he retired to write. His biographer, Louis Sheaffer, comments, "he never stated publicly why he changed denominations." birth_name origin Akron (Akron, Ohio), Ohio, United States instrument Vocals, guitar, harmonica, bass '''Joseph Arthur''' (born September 28) is an American singer-songwriter and artist from Akron (Akron, Ohio), Ohio. Combining poetic lyrics with a layered sonic palette, Arthur has built his reputation over the years through critically acclaimed releases and constant touring; his unique solo live performances incorporate the use of a number of distortion and loop pedals, and his shows are recorded live at the soundboard and made available to concertgoers immediately following the show on recordable media. Arthur was discovered by Peter Gabriel in the mid-'90s, and signed to Gabriel's Real World (Real World Records) label as the first North American artist on the label's roster. Arthur released his debut album ''Big City Secrets'' (1997) and follow-up, ''Come to Where I'm From'' (2000) on Real World before signing with various independent labels between 2002 and 2006. He established his own record label, Lonely Astronaut Records, in 2006, and released two studio albums, ''Let's Just Be'' (2007) and ''Temporary People'' (2008) with backing band The Lonely Astronauts. Arthur subsequently returned to performing and recording as a solo artist, releasing ''The Graduation Ceremony'' in 2011 and the double album, ''Redemption City'' in 2012. * A cereal mill in Cedar Rapids (Cedar Rapids, Iowa), Iowa owned by John Stuart, his son Robert Stuart (Robert Stuart (businessman)), and their partner George Douglas; * The German Mills American Oatmeal Company, owned by "The Oatmeal King", Ferdinand Schumacher of Akron (Akron, Ohio), Ohio; * The Rob Lewis & Co. American Oats and Barley Oatmeal Corporation. Formally known as "Good For Breakfast" instant oatmeal mix. The '''Soap Box Derby''' is a youth soapbox car racing program which has been run in the United States since 1934. World Championship finals are held each July at Derby Downs in Akron, Ohio. Cars competing in this and related events are unpowered, relying completely upon gravity to move. Following her retirement from figure skating in 1960, Heiss played the female lead in the 1961 film ''Snow White and the Three Stooges''. She married Hayes Alan Jenkins, who had won the 1956 Winter Olympic gold medal in men's figure skating, and whose brother David Jenkins (David Jenkins (figure skater)) had won the men's figure skating gold medal in 1960. Although Heiss briefly skated in ice shows after the Squaw Valley Winter Olympics, she retired from the sport in 1962. However, in the late 1970s, she returned to coach several skaters in her hometown area, Akron, Ohio where she became a prominent figure skating coach and is now coaching in Lakewood, Ohio. Some of her students include Timothy Goebel, Tonia Kwiatkowski and Miki Ando. '''Jarrod Alexander Cooper''' (born March 31, 1978 in Akron, Ohio) is a former American football safety (Safety (American football position)) with the Oakland Raiders and Carolina Panthers. He was drafted by the Panthers in the fifth round of the 2001 NFL Draft. He played college football at Kansas State (Kansas State Wildcats football). - 14 align "left" Cleveland-Akron-Canton-Lorain-Elyria align "left" Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio), OH; Akron (Akron, Ohio), OH; Canton (Canton, Ohio), OH; Lorain (Lorain, Ohio)-Elyria (Elyria, Ohio), OH 2,722,194 - Biography Sanders was born in Leon, New York, where he attended the common schools, and taught school in New York. He was a nephew of Sidney Edgarton (First Montana Governor). He moved to Ohio in 1854, where he continued teaching, and studied law in Akron (Akron, Ohio), gaining admission to the bar (bar (law)) in 1856. In 1991, Ruiz de Velasco created a painting for the Playboy Collection in Chicago, Illinois. She was then asked by the curator , Jack Bolton, of the Rockefeller Collection in New York to create a piece for their collection.In 1994, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company Goodyear Corporation in Akron, Ohio held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their private executive gallery (Art gallery). In 1995, Coronado S.A. de C.V. held an exhibition of Ruiz de Velasco's artwork in their gallery in México, D.F (Mexican Federal District). '''Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens''' (70 acres) is a notable country estate (estate (land)), with gardens, located at 714 North Portage Path in Akron, Ohio. It ranks seventh on the list of largest houses in the United States. A&E, with Richard Guy Wilson, Ph.D., (2000). America's Castles: The Auto Baron Estates, ''A&E Television Network'' During his architectural career Schneider designed a number of offices, academic buildings, and residences. Perhaps his best-known work is Stan Hywet (Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens) (1915), an Akron (Akron, Ohio) mansion based on several English country houses. Aslet, Clive (2005). ''The American Country House'', p. 78. New Haven & London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300105053. His academic work includes the ornate Italian Renaissance-style Rockefeller Physics Building (1905) and Quad Hall (1925) at the Case School of Applied Science (now Case Western Reserve University), and Austin Hall at Ohio Wesleyan University. Other work includes the classical Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Building (1921), Plymouth Church (Plymouth Church of Shaker Heights) in Shaker Heights (Shaker Heights, Ohio) (1923), and the office building of the Cleveland Baseball Company at League Park. Born in Melrose, Iowa, he attended the public schools and graduated from the State University of Iowa (in 1916) and from its College of Law (University of Iowa College of Law) (in 1927). He received his LL.M. from Columbia Law School in 1928 and was a sales analyst and accountant for a rubber company in Akron, Ohio, and Dallas, Texas, in 1916 and 1917. During the First World War he served as a first lieutenant with the Thirty-fifth Infantry, United States Army, from 1917 to 1919. After the war, he continued work in the rubber industry, then became an assistant professor of military science and tactics at the University of Iowa from 1921 to 1923. He was admitted to the Iowa bar (bar (law)) in 1927 and commenced practice in Iowa City, of which he served as city solicitor from 1933 to 1935 and mayor from 1935 to 1937.


productions including

and played leading roles for Henry Duffy. In Louisville, Kentucky, she acted with Wilton Lackaye, Edmund Breese, William Faversham, Tom Wise and Nance O'Neil. There were regular productions, including ''Ned McCobb's Daughter'', ''The Front Page'', ''The Big Fight'', and a "transcontinental tour" starring MacGibbon in ''The Big Fight'', which began in Boston (Boston, Massachusetts), took in New Haven (New Haven, Connecticut) and Hartford (Hartford, Connecticut), and ended

Akron, Ohio

'''Akron''' The Akron, OH Metropolitan Statistical Area (Akron Metropolitan Statistical Area) (MSA) covers Summit and Portage (Portage County, Ohio) counties, and in 2010 had a population of 703,200. Akron is also part of the larger Cleveland-Akron-Canton, OH Combined Statistical Area (Northeast Ohio), which in 2010 had a population of 3,515,646.

Akron was co-founded in 1825 when suggested by Paul Williams to Simon Perkins. In 1833, "South" was temporarily added to the name when Eliakim Crosby settled a bordering North Akron. In 1851, Sojourner Truth attended a convention and extemporaneously delivered the original "Ain't I a Woman?" speech. During the Civil War (American Civil War), Ferdinand Schumacher supplied the Union Army with oats produced by his mill along the Ohio Canal. Between the 1870s and World War I, numerous churches across the nation were built using the Akron Plan. ''When Church Became Theatre: The Transformation of Evangelical Architecture and Worship in Nineteenth-Century America''. Jeanne Halgren Kilde. Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN 978-0-19-517972-9.`p.185

With a population increase of 201.8% during the 1910s, it became the nation's fastest-growing city due to industries such as stoneware, sanitary sewer, fishing tackle, farming equipment, match, toy, and rubber. The All-American Soapbox Derby, WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, National Hamburger Festival (Hamburger), Founders Day (Alcoholics Anonymous) (Alcoholics Anonymous), and Road Runner Akron Marathon are annually hosted by the city, which was a venue for some events of the 2014 Gay Games (Gay Games). Tourist attractions include Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens (Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens) and Lock 3 Park, where the American Marble & Toy Manufacturing Company once stood.

Residents of Akron are referred to as "Akronites (List of people from Akron, Ohio)." Nicknames include "Rubber City," "City of Invention" and "Rubber Capital of the World."

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