Abomey

What is Abomey known for?


political culture

, a few kilometers to the northwest of Bohicon. He was a wise ruler, respected by the people. He enacted laws, named ministers and developed the bureaucracy, religious cult, and political culture that would characterize Dahomey. Houegbadja's symbols were a fish (houe), fish trap (adja), and war club hoe (kpota). Akaba had to build his own palace because of a particular custom of the Abomey royal family. At the death of each of the kings of Abomey, his palace became a funeral


intense

;, deployed here in your worship Salvador (Salvador, Bahia), Cachoeira (Cachoeira, Bahia) and São Félix (São Félix, Bahia) in Bahia, and São Luís (São Luís, Maranhão) of Maranhão, then spread itself to several Brazilian states. The 1951 election illustrated the intense regionalism that was forming in the French colony; the election has been cited as when regionalist parties arose. Indeed, it was the first whose pamphlets mentioned ethnicity. ref name

de la IVe République: Hubert Maga newspaper National Assembly of France accessdate 2008-10-25 . where he remained for three years. During his subsequent schooling at the Ponty Normal School in Dakar, Maga became friends with Hamani Diori, the future president of Niger. . Legacy Maga's rise to power occurred during a period of intense regionalism, spurred by the historical resentment shared by members


main traditional

dependencies." In 1900, it became Dahomey's capital city. thumb left 150px Voodoo altar with several fetishes in Abomey (File:Voodo-altar.jpg), BeninTraditional African religion is the oldest and original religion of the native populations of this region, and includes Yoruba religion, Odinani, Serer religion, etc. It is spiritual but also linked to the historical and cultural heritage of the people. John S


pearls

Porto-Novo. Agadja's reign was characterized by continual warfare. The Yorùbá (Yoruba people) soldiers of the Oyo Empire defeated the army of Abomey; Agadja parlayed peace terms including the payment of tribute. For the next hundred years, the Kingdom of Abomey paid the King of Oyo (Oyo Empire) an annual tribute in young men and women destined for slavery or death in ceremonies, as well as cloth, guns, animals and pearls. Agadja's reign was characterized by continual

warfare. The Yorùbá (Yoruba people) soldiers of the Oyo Empire defeated the army of Abomey; Agadja parlayed peace terms including the payment of tribute. For the next hundred years, the Kingdom of Abomey paid the King of Oyo (Oyo Empire) an annual tribute in young men and women destined for slavery or death in ceremonies, as well as cloth, guns, animals and pearls. The kingdom of Abomey grew during Agadja's reign, however; it conquered Allada in 1724, and in 1727


people+creating

who are believed to have founded the city. Grolier, Limited. The Encyclopedia Americana, Volume 3, p550. Grolier, 1984. ISBN 0717201163 Those Aja living in Abomey mingled with the local Fon people, also a Gbe people, creating a new ethnic group known as "Dahomey". Jonathan Baker. Rural-urban dynamics in francophone Africa. p84. Nordic Africa Institute, 1997. ISBN 917106401X The Gbe peoples are said to be descendents of a number


rich+complex

2008 '''Candomblé Jeje''' is the Candomblé cult that the Vodou (West African Vodun)s of Kingdom of Dahomey (Abomey) brought to the Brazil by enslaved Africans in various regions of West Africa and Central Africa. These Voduns are the rich, complex and high Fon mythology. The various ethnic groups as Fon (Fon people), Ewe (Ewe (people)), Fante (Fante language), Ashanti (Ashanti people), mine (Mining) to come in Brazil, were called "djedje"


world history

Wikipedia:Abomey Commons:Category:Abomey


significant traditional

and historically significant traditional sites in West Africa, the palaces form one of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The town was surrounded by a mud wall with a circumference estimated at six miles (''Encyclopaedia Britannica'', 1911), pierced by six gates, and protected by a ditch five feet deep, filled with a dense growth of prickly acacia, the usual defence of West African strongholds. Within the walls were villages separated by fields, several royal palaces, a market-place and a large square containing the barracks. In November 1892, Béhanzin, the last independent reigning king of Dahomey, being defeated by French colonial forces, set fire to Abomey and fled northward. The French colonial administration (French West Africa) rebuilt the town and connected it with the coast by a railroad. Wikipedia:Abomey Commons:Category:Abomey


work world

classroom unesco abomey.html History.com - 1860s 24 000 - 1979 38 412 - 1992


tradition

circular alter for receiving the offerings. According to Fon tradition, the asen originated in Allada and were brought to Abomey before the 17th century. Houessou Akaba's reign was characterized by war and military expansion. His enemies, the Nago (Western Yoruba (Yoruba people)) kings, attacked Abomey and burned the town. But the warriors of Abomey ultimately defeated the Nago armies and the kingdom extended to include the banks of the Oueme River. Akaba failed, however, to capture

conquered the kingdom of Savi, including its major city, Ouidah. Agadja's victory over Ouidah came in part as a result of his use of a corps of women shock-troopers, called Dahomey Amazons by the Europeans after the women warriors of Greek myth, in his army. The Amazons became a dynastic tradition. When Abomey conquered Savi and Ouidah, it gained direct access to the sea and took over the lucrative slave trade with the Europeans. As a result, Agadja's symbol

is a European caravel boat. The kingdom of Abomey grew during Agadja's reign, however; it conquered Allada in 1724, and in 1727 conquered the kingdom of Savi, including its major city, Ouidah. Agadja's victory over Ouidah came in part as a result of his use of a corps of women shock-troopers, called Dahomey Amazons by the Europeans after the women warriors of Greek myth, in his army. The Amazons became a dynastic tradition. When Abomey conquered Savi and Ouidah

Abomey

'''Abomey''' is a city in the Zou Department of Benin, formerly the capital of the ancient kingdom of Dahomey, including the Republic of Dahomey (1960–1975) which became modern-day Benin. The kingdom was established about 1625. The commune covers an area of 142 square kilometres and as of 2012 had a population of 90,195 people.

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