Places Known For

social diversity


Macapá

address Av. Feliciano Coelho, 1509 - Bairro do Trem lat long directions phone +55 96 3212-5342 tollfree fax hours Mo-Fr 7:30-11:30AM and 2:30-5PM; Sa 3-6PM price Free, but worth paying for a guide if you speak Portuguese content Open-air museum which presents the social diversity of the state. * wikipedia:Macapá


Yaroslavl

for 'The Modern State: Standards of Democracy and Criteria of Efficiency'. In 2011 Yaroslavl will bring together participants from all over the world to discuss the 2011 agenda: 'The modern state in the age of social diversity'. On September 7, 2011, most of the members of the city's KHL (ice hockey) team, Lokomotiv Yaroslavl, perished in an air crash (2011 Lokomotiv Yaroslavl air disaster) on takeoff from Yaroslavl's Tunoshna Airport. Symbols Yaroslavl currently has


Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

'', ''!earshot'', Women’s Hands and Voices, the Community Radio Fund of Canada, sector-wide listservs, and an annual radio conference. The NCRA recognizes the cultural and social diversity of the Canadian population and is committed to facilitating the expression of this diversity and vitality within the campus and community radio broadcasting sector. In Canada, Bell TV and Vidéotron offer 45 channels provided by Galaxie (Galaxie (radio)), while Shaw Direct, Shaw Digital Cable (Shaw Cablesystems) and Rogers Digital Cable (Rogers Cable Inc.) each offer 40 music channels: 20 provided by Max Trax, the other 20 provided by Galaxie. In many markets, Rogers Cable also provides digital cable feeds of most local AM and FM radio stations; Rogers no longer offers the older type of cable FM service formerly required by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). Persona (Persona Communications) offers 39 channels from Galaxie and Maxtrax. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) requires all television services in Canada to broadcast a minimum percentage of Canadian content, both during the day and during primetime. '''Sirius Canada''' is a Canadian (Canada) company, a partnership between Slaight Communications, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Sirius Satellite Radio, which was one of three services licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on June 16, 2005 to introduce satellite radio service to Canada. Although being Canadian in origin, Genesis Storytime was mainly distributed in the USA because of Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission regulations that hindered the distribution of Genesis Storytime in Canada. VSP-7 (Videon Cablesystems), a public-access channel in Winnipeg, did air the channel as a 30-minute program on the schedule, ending the program even if a story was not completed. Prior to the 1970s, Canadian radio stations gave almost no airtime to Canadian music, and apart from CBC Television, Canadian television stations spent very little money on Canadian-produced programming. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) adopted Canadian content regulations to resolve this, although even today such regulation is still criticized by some Canadians CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


Beijing

Wikipedia:Beijing Dmoz:Regional Asia China Beijing commons:北京


Indonesia

with the physical environment. Although Indonesians are now less vulnerable to the effects of nature as a result of improved technology and social programs, to some extent their social diversity has emerged from traditionally different patterns of adjustment to their physical circumstances. '''Politics of Indonesia''' takes place in a framework of a presidential (Presidential system) representative democratic (Representative democracy) republic, whereby the President


Northern Ireland

conversation. Of course, being such a small, isolated country with a troubled past has also led to a decidedly noticeable lack in social diversity. It is worth noting that the majority of people you will encounter will be white. It isn't unusual to go a few days without encountering any multiculturalism, apart from other visitors or Chinese restaurants. This will make quite a change if you are from countries such as England or the US.  Racism is not generally an issue, however, due to the openness and rather frank humour in Northern Ireland, small, sarcastic comments may be made about the issue, in jest, if a local encounters someone outside of his or her own nationality. It is best not to react to this, as it is most likely just a joke, and should be treated as such. In fact, in Northern Ireland, a "mixed marriage" refers to a Catholic marrying a Protestant. Gay and lesbian travellers should be aware that some citizens of Northern Ireland are not the most accepting when it comes to homosexuality. This is not necessarily due to the people being averse to it, but rather the fact that there are virtually no examples of any gay and lesbian communities outside Central Belfast. It should be noted, however, that parts of the capital (for example the University Quarter) are perfectly safe and accepting of gay and lesbian people, with both of Belfast's universities incorporating active LGBT societies. However, there have been issues of more severe racism in parts of the province in recent years. Belfast is the most ethnically diverse area, but even so the city is over 97% white. Typically, incidents of racism have been confined to South Belfast, which has a higher mix of non-white ethnicities due to its location near Queen's University. After decades of little or no immigration, some people find it hard to accept outsiders moving in, and racist attacks are usually to an immigrant's property, rather than the immigrants themselves.  WikiPedia:Northern Ireland Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom Northern Ireland commons:Northern Ireland


Toronto

2009-05-27 and at Institutes of the Linguistic Society of America (1993, 1997, 2003, 2007) and the Associação Brasileira de Lingüística (1999, 2005). In sociolinguistics he has focused on language variation, language contact, quantitative methods (Quantitative linguistics), and the connection between social diversity and language change. He has conducted research on Brazilian Portuguese, Australian (Australian English) and American English, and Dominican


Singapore

of China (mainland China), 98% of the population of the Republic of China (Taiwan), 74% of the population of Singapore, and about 20% of the entire global human population (World population), making it the largest ethnic group in the world (List of ethnic groups by population). There is considerable genetic, linguistic, cultural, and social diversity among the subgroups of the Han (Han Chinese subgroups), mainly due to thousands of years of immigration and assimilation of various regional ethnicities and tribes within China. The Han Chinese are a subset of the Chinese nation (Zhonghua minzu) (''Zhonghua minzu''). Sometimes Han and other Chinese refer to themselves as the "Descendants of the Yan and Huang Emperors" ( Commons:Category:Singapore Wikipedia:Singapore Dmoz:Regional Asia Singapore


Canada

Commons:Category:Canada Wikipedia:Canada dmoz:Regional North America Canada


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