Places Known For

significant work


Venetian Dalmatia

the Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque periods. Trogir's grandest building is the church of St. Lawrence, whose main west portal is a masterpiece by Radovan (Radovan (master)), and the most significant work of the Romanesque-Gothic style in Croatia. The British Encyclopedia 1911 British Encyclopedia, p.774 states that: "... from Italy (and Venice) came the Romanesque. The belfry of S. Maria, at Zara, erected in 1105, is first in a long list of Romanesque buildings. At Arbe there is a beautiful Romanesque campanile which also belongs to the 12th century; but the finest example in this style is the cathedral of Trau. The 14th century Dominican and Franciscan convents in Ragusa are also noteworthy. Romanesque lingered on in Dalmatia until it was displaced by Venetian Gothic in the early years of the 15th century. The influence of Venice was then at its height. Even in the relatively hostile Republic of Ragusa the Romanesque of the custom-house and Rectors' palace is combined with Venetian Gothic, while the graceful balconies and ogee windows of the Prijeki closely follow their Venetian models. In 1441 Giorgio Orsini of Zara, summoned from Venice to design the cathedral of Sebenico, brought with him the influence of the Italian Renaissance. The new forms which he introduced were eagerly imitated and developed by other architects, until the period of decadence - which virtually concludes the history of Dalmatian art - set in during the latter half of the 17th century. Special mention must be made of the carved woodwork, embroideries and plate preserved in many churches. The silver statuette and the reliquary of St. Biagio at Ragusa, and the silver ark of St. Simeon at Zara, are fine specimens of Italian jewelers' work, ranging in date from the 11th or 12th to the 17th century ...". In the 19th century the cultural influence from Venice & the Italian peninsula (Italy) originated the editing in Zara of the first Dalmatian newspaper, in Italian (Italian language) and Croatian (Croatian language): ''Il Regio Dalmata – Kraglski Dalmatin'', founded and published by the Italian Bartolomeo Benincasa in 1806 AD. Furthermore, this ''Kraglski Dalmatin'' was stamped in the typography of Antonio Luigi Battara and was the first fully done in Croatian language. Governors The ''Provveditore generale'' (Governor-general) was the official name of Venetian state officials supervising Dalmatia. Category:History of Dalmatia Category:Venetian period in the history of Croatia Category:16th century in Croatia Category:17th century in Croatia Category:18th century in Croatia Category:History of Italy


Trogir

Travnik, Bosnia and Herzegovina (1972) In 998 Zadar sought Venetian protection against the Neretvian pirates (Neretvians). Britannica 1911: Zara The Venetians were quick to fully exploit this opportunity: in 998 a fleet commanded by Doge (Doge of Venice) Pietro Orseolo II, after having defeated pirates, landed in Korčula and Lastovo. Dalmatia was taken by surprise and offered little serious resistance. Trogir was the exception and was subjected to Venetian rule only after a bloody struggle, whereas the Republic of Dubrovnik was forced to pay tribute. Britannica 1911: Illyria Tribute previously paid by Zadar to Croatian kings, was redirected to Venice, a state of affairs which lasted for several years. left thumb 140px Chest of Saint Simeon (File:Simeon Schrein (Zadar).jpg) photographed around 1900 This did not break the spirit of the city, however. Its commerce was suffering due to a lack of autonomy under Venice, while it enjoyed considerable autonomy under the much more feudal Croatian-Hungarian Kingdom. A number of insurrections followed (1242–1243, 1320s, 1345–1346) which finally resulted in Zadar coming back under the crown of the Croatian-Hungarian king Louis I (Louis I of Hungary) under the Treaty of Zadar (Treaty of Zara), in 1358. After the War of Chioggia between

significant work of the Romanesque-Gothic style in Croatia. Notable attractions include the Fortress Kamerlengo (Kamerlengo Castle) and the Cathedral of St. Lawrence, Trogir. The name of the town has been changing depending on the historical period, being Clodia, Cluza, Clugia, Chiozza and Chioggia. History of Chioggia The most ancient documents naming Chioggia dates from the 6th century AD, when it was part of the Byzantine Empire. Chioggia was destroyed by the King Pippin of Italy in the 9th century, but rebuilt around a new industry based on salt pan (Salt evaporation pond)s. In the Middle Ages, Chioggia proper was known as ''Clugia major'', whereas ''Clugia minor'' was a sand bar about 600 m further into the Adriatic. A free commune and an episcopal see from 1110, it had later an important role in the so-called War of Chioggia between Genoa and Venice, being conquered by Genoa in 1378 and finally by Venice in June 1380. Although the town remained largely autonomous, it was always thereafter subordinate to Venice. On 14th of March 1381, Chioggia concluded an alliance with Zadar and Trogir against Venice, and finally Chioggia became better protected by Venice in 1412, because Šibenik became in 1412 the seat of the main customs office and the seat of the salt consumers office with a monopoly on the salt trade in Chioggia and on the whole Adriatic Sea. The Mongols' pursuit of Béla IV continued from Zagreb through Pannonia to Dalmatia. While in pursuit, the Mongols under the leadership of Kadan (Qadan) suffered a major defeat at Klis Fortress in Croatia in March 1242. Prošlost Klisa Wikipedia:Trogir Dmoz:Regional Europe Croatia Localities Trogir Commons:Category:Trogir


Edirne

Commons:Edirne


York, Pennsylvania

the eastern terminus of Pennsylvania Route 283, which heads to Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), and then shares a brief concurrency with U.S. Route 222. From 1997 to 2004 significant work was completed to the bypass around Lancaster. Just east of Lancaster, the eastern end of PA 462 meets with U.S. 30 as the latter route continues on its way to Philadelphia. thumb 300px Hessian (soldiers) Hessian (Image:PhiladelCampaignHessianMap.jpg) map of the campaign from August 25


Arequipa

; It was named after Uriah A. Boyden, who in 1879 left in his will $238,000 to Harvard Observatory to be used for astronomical purposes. Significant work done at Arequipa include the discovery of Phoebe (Phoebe (moon)), an outer moon of Saturn, by William Henry Pickering using photographic plates captured with the


Bogotá

of poetry, short stories, and novels. His most significant work is entitled ''The Adventures and Misadventures of Maqroll''. - bgcolor #DDEEFF align center Bogotá Estadio El Campín 48,300 - bgcolor #DDEEFF align center Miscellaneous *As a homage to his figure, there is a neighbourhood in Bogotá named Nicolás de Federmán (Nicolás de Federmán (neighborhood)), the Spanish rendering of his own name and as he was known by his fellow Spanish Conquistador conquistadores


Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

on the Wright's Ferry Bridge into Lancaster County (Lancaster County, Pennsylvania). Along the north side of Lancaster, US 30 intersects the eastern terminus of Pennsylvania Route 283, which heads to Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), and then shares a brief concurrency with U.S. Route 222. From 1997 to 2004 significant work was completed to the bypass around Lancaster. Just east of Lancaster, the eastern end of PA 462 meets with U.S. 30 as the latter route continues on its


Haifa

, which (as a vassal of the Armenians) had supported the Mongols, the traditional enemies of the Turks. In 1265, Baibars took Caesarea (Caesarea Maritima), Haifa and Arsuf and massacred the inhabitants. A year later, Baibars conquered Galilee and devastated Cilician Armenia. ''Al-Taghriba al-Filistiniyya'' (The Palestinian Exile), directed by Hatem Ali, is her other significant work, where Nadine stars with Syrian actor Jamal Sulayman. The series, about twentieth


Lima

— Campinas, Brazil * Lima Valley — Lima, Peru The Boyden Station of Harvard Observatory (Harvard College Observatory) was founded in 1889 by Harvard University at Mount Harvard near Lima, Peru. It was relocated to Arequipa, Peru in October 1890. It was named after Uriah A. Boyden, who in 1879 left in his will $238,000 to Harvard Observatory to be used for astronomical purposes. Significant work done at Arequipa include the discovery of Phoebe (Phoebe (moon)), an outer moon of Saturn, by William Henry Pickering using photographic plates captured with the Dmoz:Regional South America Peru Departments Lima Lima Commons:Category:Lima Wikipedia:Lima


Peru

anthropologist , he did significant work in archaeology and anthropological linguistics, and he contributed to anthropology by making connections between archaeology and culture. He conducted excavations in New Mexico, Mexico, and Peru. In Peru he helped found the Institute for Andean Studies (IAS) with the Peruvian anthropologist Julio C. Tello and other major scholars. *In Norway the Coop (Coop NKL) chain operates hypermarkets under the Obs! name. *In Peru

* Philippines: '''9999*''' The Boyden Station of Harvard Observatory (Harvard College Observatory) was founded in 1889 by Harvard University at Mount Harvard near Lima, Peru. It was relocated to Arequipa, Peru in October 1890. It was named after Uriah A. Boyden, who in 1879 left in his will $238,000 to Harvard Observatory to be used for astronomical purposes. Significant work done at Arequipa include the discovery of Phoebe (Phoebe (moon)), an outer moon of Saturn, by William Henry Pickering using photographic plates captured with the Commons:Category:Peru


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017