Places Known For

school radio


Thornhill, Ontario

'''. It is the only licensed high school radio station in Thornhill, Ontario and is owned and operated by Vaughan Secondary School. RAV FM is part of the school's radio broadcasting course, and is one of a small number of Canadian radio stations (List of high school radio stations in Canada) licensed to a high school. birth_date ) is a private Orthodox Jewish elementary school in Thornhill (Thornhill, Ontario), Ontario. The school is mostly characterized by its Modern Orthodox and Zionist approach to the entire curriculum, with an emphasis on "Ivrit b'Ivrit" (Hebrew subjects taught in Hebrew) and teachers who are shlichim, Israeli emissaries living in Canada on short three-to-five year terms. This gives students an authentic taste of modern Israeli language and culture. As well, the students learn better Hebrew from the shlichim.


Vaughan

61 Vaughan, Ontario Remington Group Inc. - - CFU758 00 90.7 FM Vaughan Vaughan Secondary School high school radio - Development pressures The greatest threat to the function of the moraine is land development on and below its


Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

to its existing AM FM combos in each city.) Initially licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 1996, Decision CRTC 96-229 it was the first licensed high school radio (List of high school radio stations in Canada) station in Canada. The station didn't go on air until the 1997–1998 school year because the station is run by high school students and had to wait until the start of the following year. From 1983 to 2011, CKLN Radio Inc. was licenced by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission as a campus (campus radio)-community FM radio station affiliated with Ryerson University, and broadcast at 88.1 MHz on the FM (FM radio) dial with the call sign CKLN-FM. It ceased FM broadcasting on April 15, 2011 after its licence was revoked on January 28, 2011 CRTC revokes licence of Toronto campus radio station and continued as an internet radio outlet until it ceased operations on December 26, 2011. Its domain name is now owned by Chris Scully. "About the domain ckln.fm" October 11, 2011 On September 28, 2011, Dufferin Communications, the owner of CIRR-FM 103.9 (CIRR-FM) (PROUD FM) applied to the CRTC to move to 88.1 MHz, formerly held by CKLN-FM, and to increase its transmitter power. The CRTC issued a Broadcast Notice of Consultation inviting other interested parties to apply for the frequency as well. The deadline for applications was December 19, 2011. Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2011-625 In total, 27 applications were received for the frequency; Calls for Broadcasting Licence Applications 2011. Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. including Dufferin Communications, applications were also filed by MZ Media, Astral Media, Newcap Radio, Larche Communications, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Trust Communications, Intercity Broadcasting (CKFG-FM), CHIN Radio TV International, La Coopérative Radiophonique de Toronto (CHOQ-FM) and numerous ethnic broadcasters, as well as a new student group from Ryerson University who have pledged to launch a new campus station that would be organized and governed very differently from CKLN. "Stations vie for vacant radio licence". ''The Globe and Mail'', December 18, 2012. Specific details of the applications have not yet been released. * Canadian Prime Minister (Prime Minister of Canada) Paul Martin expels Mississauga—Erindale Member of Parliament Carolyn Parrish from the Liberal Party (Liberal Party of Canada) caucus, after the controversial MP tells the Canadian Press she feels no loyalty to the party, or to the prime minister. (CBC) * The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approves an application by the American news channel Fox News for a digital (digital television) licence. Fox's previous exclusion from the Canadian airwaves had been criticized by some Canadians as being motivated by the network's perceived conservative bias. (CBC) * The European Parliament approves the new make-up of the European Commission, headed by José Manuel Barroso. (Xinhua) (Bloomberg) History VideoFACT (as it was originally known) was created in 1984 with the launch of MuchMusic as a condition of its licence applied by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). Two years later with the launch of MusiquePlus, it also became a sponsor, as did MuchMoreMusic when it launched in 1998. This system was partially approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on February 28, 2007, with conditions CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


Concord, New Hampshire

School high school radio - Educated at St. Paul's School (St. Paul's School (U.S.)) in Concord, New Hampshire, he attended Princeton University and the United States Naval Academy. '''New Hampshire Public Radio''' ('''NHPR''') is a public radio network (Radio network) serving the state of New Hampshire. NHPR is based in Concord (Concord, New Hampshire) and operates seven transmitters and six translators covering nearly the whole state. All signals carry


Kingston, Ontario

years. image city Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario branding The Cave '''CKVI-FM''' is a Canadian (Canada) community radio station, owned and operated by Kingston Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario. The station broadcasts at 91.9 on the FM (FM radio) dial, and uses the on-air brand "The Cave". CKVI was the first high school radio station to be granted a broadcasting license by the CRTC. - Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario CKLC (CKLC (AM)) Macleod emigrated with his family from Scotland in 1845 when his father purchased a farm at Richmond Hill, Ontario. Macleod attended Upper Canada College in Toronto, Ontario and then Queen’s College (Queens University) in Kingston, Ontario. He graduated in 1854 from Queen's with a B.A. in classics and philosophy and then enrolled in 1856 at Osgoode Hall to attend law school. He graduated with an LL.B. in 1860 and articled with the law office of Alexander Campbell. It was also sometime around this time that he joined the Orange Order (Orange Institution), L.O.L. 141, as was common of Canadian Ulster-Scots at the time. - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.


Baton Rouge, Louisiana

broadcasting FM ) is a student-run jazz high school radio station in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The station, at Baton Rouge Magnet High School, broadcasts with an effective radiated power (ERP) of 21 kW. It is owned by the East Baton Rouge Parish School Board, along with sister station KBRH 1260 AM. '''WEMX''' (94.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Max 94.1") is a radio station serving the Baton Rouge (Baton Rouge, Louisiana) area. The Cumulus Media station broadcasts with an ERP (Effective radiated power) of 100 kW and is licensed to Kentwood, Louisiana. '''KRVE (Lite Rock 96.1 the River)''' is an Adult Contemporary outlet serving the Baton Rouge (Baton Rouge, Louisiana) area. The Clear Channel Communications station broadcasts at 96.1 MHz with an ERP of 50 kW and is licensed to Brusly, Louisiana. Its current slogan is '''"Lite Rock, Less Talk."''' '''WDGL''' (98.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Eagle 98.1") is a Classic rock music formatted radio station licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The station, which is owned by Guaranty Broadcasting, operates at 98.1 MHz with an ERP of 100 kW. Its current slogan is '''"Your 10-In-A-Row Classic Rock Station."''' It is the flagship radio station for the Louisiana State University (LSU Tigers) athletics broadcasts. '''WTGE''' (100.7 FM (FM broadcasting), "New Country 100.7 The Tiger") is am American radio station licensed to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, the station serves the Lafayette, Baton Rouge area. The station is currently owned by Guaranty Broadcasting Company of Baton Rouge, LLC. , and as of the end of 2007, had 12,718 interments. '''William F. "Bill" Cotton Sr.''' (October 23, 1897 – April 23, 2006) was a prominent central Louisiana businessman who acquired or built five bakeries (bakery) in Alexandria (Alexandria, Louisiana), Shreveport (Shreveport, Louisiana), Baton Rouge (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), Monroe (Monroe, Louisiana) and Natchez, Mississippi. At the time of his death at the age of 108, he was also the nation's oldest living Shriner (Shriners) and one of the last remaining American (United States) veterans of the First World War (World War I). birth_date Birth date missing birth_place Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States death_date DATE OF BIRTH PLACE OF BIRTH Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States DATE OF DEATH thumb right 160px Thad Allen (Image:Thad Allen.jpg) The U.S. (w:United States) Secretary of Homeland Security (w: United States Department of Homeland Security), Michael Chertoff (w: Michael Chertoff), announced from Baton Rouge (w:Baton Rouge, Louisiana), Louisiana (w:Louisiana) on Friday that Coast Guard (w: United States Coast Guard) Vice Admiral Thad W. Allen (w:Thad W. Allen) will replace the Federal Emergency Management Agency (w:FEMA) (FEMA) director Michael D. Brown (w:Michael D. Brown) as the Principal Federal Official (PFO) for the recovery effort; however, Mr. Brown will continue as the Director of FEMA. The inauguration ceremony was held at the state capitol in Baton Rouge (w:Baton Rouge, Louisiana). In a speech, Jindal vowed to put an end to political corruption in the state and speed up recovery from the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season (w:2005 Atlantic hurricane season).


Dayton, Ohio

for a few years he lived in Fairfield and Hamilton, Ohio, where his parents owned and operated a pair of Cassano's Pizza King franchises. As a little boy, he would don an apron and red bow tie and make pizzas with his folks. When Gallagher was 11 years old, his father died on Christmas Day, 1971 from leukemia. His mother died ten years later of bladder cancer. He attended Chaminade-Julienne High School in downtown Dayton (graduating in 1978), where he was active in the school radio


Philadelphia

on air from anywhere in the world from its website, www.wcur.org. thumb Haverford High School (File:HHS Aud.JPG) '''WHHS''' is the student-run high school radio station of Haverford Senior High School, in Havertown, Pennsylvania (a suburb of Philadelphia). WHHS is the oldest high school radio station in the country.


Milwaukee

, such as the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay facilities producing programming in the Hmong language for weekend broadcast over Green Bay Ideas Network flagship WHID. Not all UW-owned stations are part of the network; some are student-run, and others, like WUWM, are independently-operated public stations. Two high school radio stations (one, WEPS, is located in the northwest Chicago (Chicago, Illinois) suburb of Elgin (Elgin, Illinois), and its signal does not reach the Wisconsin state


Seattle

Television CBC ) from Vancouver, British Columbia. Non-commercial radio stations include NPR (National Public Radio) affiliates KUOW-FM 94.9 and KPLU-FM 88.5 (Tacoma), as well as classical music station KING-FM 98.1. Other stations include KEXP-FM 90.3 (affiliated with the UW), community radio KBCS-FM 91.3 (affiliated with Bellevue College), and high school radio KNHC-FM 89.5, which broadcasts an electronic dance music radio format


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017