Places Known For

scenic setting


Taizhou, Jiangsu

, Wuxi borders Changzhou to the west and Suzhou to the east. The northern half looks across to Taizhou (Taizhou, Jiangsu) across the Yangtze River, while the southern half also borders the province of Zhejiang to the south. Wuxi earned its nickname "Pearl of Lake Tai" because it's built on the shore of Lake Tai in a scenic setting. Wuxi was also dubbed "little Shanghai" because of its close proximity to the city, rapid urbanization and booming economy. Wuxi also has a history of business people involved in modern Shanghai commerce since the early 20th century. Taizhou, Jiangsu - Taizhou, Zhejiang - Tajik (Tajik (China)) - Tajik language - Taklamakan Desert - Tam Kung - Tang Ching-sung - Tang Dynasty - Tang Dynasty art - Tangwai - Tangram - Tanggu District - Tanggu Truce - Tanggu (drum) - Tangglau Pass - Tangshan - Tanguts - Tanichthys albonubes - Tantrayana - Tanzhe Temple - Tao - Tao Chengzhang - Tao Qian (Tao Qian (Han Dynasty)) - ''Tao Te Ching'' - Tao Yin - Taoism - Taoyuan - Tap Mun Chau - Tarim River - Tatar language - Tatars - Taylor Wang - Tea - Teapot - Television Broadcasts Limited - Temple name - Temple of Heaven - Temple of the Six Banyan Trees - Temple Street (Temple Street, Hong Kong) - Ten thousand years - Tenzin Gyatso - Teresa Teng - Terracotta Army - ''The Art of War'' - ''The Blue Lotus'' - The Bund - The Center, Hong Kong - ''The Chronicles of the Stone'' - The East is Red (1993 film) - The East Is Red (film) - The East Is Red (song) - The Frontier (Hong Kong) - ''The Gods Must Be Crazy'' - ''The Good Earth'' - ''The Injustice to Dou E'' - ''The Inn of the Sixth Happiness'' - ''The Last Emperor'' - ''The Manchurian Candidate'' - The March of the Volunteers - ''The Monkey King'' - ''The Nine Chapters on the Mathematical Art'' - The Peninsula Hong Kong - ''The Rape of Nanking (book)'' - ''The Road Home (1999 film)'' - ''The Sand Pebbles'' - ''The Standard'' - The Three August Ones and the Five Emperors - Therese Shaheen - ''Thirty-Six Strategies'' - Thomas Francis Wade - Thousand-year egg - Three Gorges - Three Gorges Dam - Three Kingdoms - Three Links - Three Principles of the People - Three represents - Three-Self Patriotic Movement -Three Years of Natural Disasters - Tian Han - Tian Shan - Tian Tan Buddha - Tiananmen Gate - Tiananmen incident - Tiananmen Square - Tiananmen Square protests of 1989 - Tiananmen Square self-immolation incident - Tianjin - Tianjin Municipality - Tianjin University - Tianlong - Tiantai - Tiantan Buddha - Tibet - Tibetan alphabet - Tibetan art - Tibetan Autonomous Region - Tibetan Buddhism - Tibetan language - Tibetan people - Tibetan Plateau - Tien Gow - Tieshangang - Tiger (zodiac) - Tiger Kung Fu - Timeline of Chinese history - Timeline of United States and China relations 1995-1997 - Tin Hau (Matsu (goddess)) - Tin Shui Wai - ''Ting Yuen'' - ''Tintin in Tibet'' - Tiu U - Tocharians - Tocharian languages - Tofu - TOM group - Tonal language - Tone name - Tone sandhi - Tong (Tong (organization)) - Tongji (spirit medium) - Tongling - Tongmenghui - Tongyong Pinyin - Tongzhi Emperor of China - Tongzhou Incident - Tony Leung Chiu Wai - Tonyukuk - Torugart Pass - Tourism in Hong Kong - Tourism in China - Traditional Chinese character - Traditional Chinese holidays - Traditional Chinese medicine - Transliteration into Chinese characters - Trans-Siberian railway - Transport in Beijing - Transport in China (Transport in the People's Republic of China) - Transport in Hong Kong - Transport in Macau - Transport in the Paracel Islands - Treaty between Tibet and Mongolia (1913) - Treaty of Nanking - Treaty of Portsmouth - Treaty of Shimonoseki - Treaty of Tientsin - Three Red Banners - Triad (Triad society) - Triple Intervention - Tsang Yok-sing - Tseung Kwan O - Tseung Kwan O Line - Tseung Kwan O Tunnel - Tsien Hsue-shen - Tsim Sha Tsui - Tsing Ma Bridge - Tsing Yi - Tsinghua University - Tsingtao beer - TSMC - Tsuen Wan - Tsuen Wan Line - Tsuen Wan New Town - Tsui Hark - Tsui Museum of Art - Tsui Po-ko - Tsung-Dao Lee - Tu (ethnic group) - Tuen Mun - Tuen Ng Festival - Tujia people -Tu Long - Tumen River - Tung Chao Yung - Tung Chee Hwa - Tung Chung - Tung Chung Fort - Tung Chung Line - Tung Lung Chau - Tuntex Sky Tower - Tuoba - Turan - Turfan Depression - Turkestan - Turpan - Tuva - TVB Pearl - Twelve Girls Band - Twenty-Four Histories - Twenty-One Demands - ''Twin Dragons (Twin Dragons (film))'' - Twins (Twins (musical group)) - Tzu Chi '''Yancheng''' ( is a Chinese (Han Chinese) chess prodigy. She is the reigning Women's World Chess Champion, the youngest ever to win the title, as well as the youngest female player ever to qualify for the title of Grandmaster (Grandmaster (chess)).


Pago Pago

of American Samoa with government offices functioning from Utulei (both are urban centers located to the northeast of Pago Pago ); Pago Pago (a deep harbor that divides the island into two parts ), the harbor town opposite to Fagatago; the Vatia village on the northern coast known for its famous beach and scenic setting, which is also a coral fringed bay; and Leone (Leone, American Samoa), a safe anchorage station in the past where the Europeans and Samoans first started their interaction in the early years of the island's history. The southwestern-most settlement is Taputimu, the western-most settlements are Poloa and Amanave, the northern-most settlement is Vatia and the eastern-most settlement is Tula (Tula, American Samoa). WikiPedia:Pago Pago, American Samoa


Flin Flon

with the development of several mines adding to its industrial base, although its population has been in decline. With a scenic setting and a number of nearby lakes, Flin Flon has also become a moderately popular tourist destination. thumb left 175px The town is named after the fictional character Josiah Flintabbatey Flonatin (Image:Flinty Statue 2.jpg) Origin of the name The town's name is taken from the lead character in a paperback novel, ''The Sunless City'' by J. E. Preston Muddock. Josiah Flintabbatey Flonatin piloted a submarine through a bottomless lake where he passed into a strange underground world through a hole lined with gold. A copy of the book was allegedly found and read by prospector Tom Creighton (Thomas Creighton). When Tom Creighton discovered a high-grade exposure of copper, he thought of the book and called it Flin Flon's mine, and the town that developed around the mine adopted the name. Flin Flon shares with Tarzana, California (Tarzana, Los Angeles), the distinction of being named after a character in a science fiction novel. The character of "Flinty", as he is locally known, is of such importance to the identity of the city that the local Chamber of Commerce commissioned the minting of a $3.00 coin which was considered legal tender amongst locally participating retailers during the year following its issue. A statue representing Flinty was designed by cartoonist Al Capp and is one of the points of interest of the city. In 1978, the National Film Board of Canada produced the short documentary ''Canada Vignettes: Flin Flon'' about the origin of the city's name. wikipedia:Flin Flon, Manitoba


Changzhou

to the south. Wuxi earned its nickname "Pearl of Lake Tai" because it's built on the shore of Lake Tai in a scenic setting. Wuxi was also dubbed "little Shanghai" because of its close proximity to the city, rapid urbanization and booming economy. Wuxi also has a history of business people involved in modern Shanghai commerce since the early 20th century. '''Zhenjiang''' (


Baden-Württemberg

palace * Mannheim - the "Squared City" is almost unique in Germany in being a planned, rectilinear city and has one of the most important theatres (the National Theatre) * Freiburg - the "Jewel of the Black Forest" is a laid-back, beautiful university city which enjoys one of the sunniest and warmest climates among German cities * Heidelberg - the romantic student city with its famed castle, Germany's oldest University and scenic setting at the opening of the Neckar valley into the Rhine valley is an absolute must for most tourists * Ulm - the Calvinist city with the world's tallest church * Heilbronn - a wealthy economic city at the Neckar river * Tübingen - beautiful university town with crooked half-timbered houses in a charming historical city centre * Konstanz - on the border to Switzerland at Lake Constance * Baden-Baden - spa town built on thermal springs at the edge of the Black Forest Other destinations * Bergstraße - a route with vineyards and several attractive towns between Darmstadt and Heidelberg * Upper Swabia ''(Oberschwaben)'' also known as the Westallgäu area of Allgäu thumbnail right Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart (File:Mercedes-Benz Museum 201312 08 blue hour.jpg) Understand Among the West-German states, Baden-Württemberg is one of the youngest, having been founded in 1952 through a unification of administrative areas that, until the end of WWI in 1919, had been mostly covered by the kingdom of ''Württemberg'', the grand-duchy of ''Baden'' and the kingdom of ''Hohenzollern''. The consequence of this - and that's the important bit a traveller should know - is that there are now two tribes living together in the state: ''Badener'' in the west and ''Schwaben'' in the east. Both speak different dialects (see below) and share a love-hate relationship towards each other that's nurtured with a lot of humour. For what unites both tribes and the rest of the people living here is a pride for "their" Baden-Württemberg and what they have made of it since its creation, that's surprising for Germans from up north. Since 1999, the state has been advertising itself all over Germany with the slogan "We can do everything - except speak Standard German." (''Wir können alles, außer Hochdeutsch''), a tongue-in-cheek play on the infamous dialects (see below). And indeed, Baden-Württemberg is doing quite well in terms of economics compared to other places in Germany. It boasts the lowest unemployment rate of the Federation, some of the best universities in Germany, a GDP per capita that rivals Switzerland and is the only German state that still has a higher birth than death rate. The European Statistics Office (Eurostat) has called Baden-Württemberg the "high-tech central of Europe". And, famously, the percentage of people owning their own home is by far the highest in Germany. The main reason for all those superlatives lies deeply in the history of the land: Although nowadays there are about as many non-Catholics as Catholics living in Baden-Württemberg (and a third group of comparable size without religious faith), during the reformation South-West Germany was strongly influenced by the schools of Martin Luther, John Calvin and Huldrych Zwingli, which left behind a society with moral values circling around hard work, self-control and the general motto "God helps those who help themselves". Hence the country that was once dirt poor, having to struggle with hard winters and frequent famines, today is plastered with high technology companies. The most important sectors are mechanical engineering (most famously Robert Bosch Inc.), Chemistry, Biotechnology and, above all, motor vehicles (which were, in fact, invented here, as everyone will be happy to point out). Daimler and Porsche were founded and still have their headquarters around Stuttgart; Audi, Volkswagen and others have large plants in the state. If one counts in the small and medium-sized suppliers, every other employee in Baden-Württemberg is working for the car industry, directly or indirectly. As Max Weber, a philosopher at Heidelberg University said, around here, it's "Capitalism as it was meant to be". thumbnail right Rainbow over the Hochenzollern Castle in the Swabian Mountains (File:Burg Hohenzollern - 6620-2.jpg) Talk While every region in Germany has its own Germanic "dialect" in addition to Standard German (''Hochdeutsch'') Baden-Württemberg (together with parts of Bavaria and Saxony) is among those regions where the "dialect" is actually the native language of the near-majority of the population (except in the north). The traditional "dialect" in most of the state is Alemannic (''Alemannisch'') which is by far the main language in German-speaking Switzerland, Liechteinstein and Vorarlberg in Austria, as well as being spoken natively by many is western Bavaria and as a minority language in Alsace in eastern France. As it is divided into numerous local dialects and has its own written language, it is '''very''' disputed as to whether it is a dialect or in fact a separate language. More and more people understandably state the latter. The exact proportion between native speakers of Standard German and Alemannic is unclear; however in general more Alemannic speakers are found in rural areas than in say, Stuttgart, where Standard German nowadays seems to be the more common mother tongue. ''Kurpfälzisch'' is the traditional language in the north of the state (i.e. the region surrounding Mannheim and Heidelberg) but standard German is what dominates in most places. That said, it is still spoken by many people in the rural areas. As good as all Alemannic-speakers are fluent in Standard German and many also in English, even in rural areas, but also tend to be surprisingly proud of their "dialect" and learning a few words or phrases in it might in fact not be the most foolish thing to do. Although native Standard German-speakers are a majority in many cities, you still will encounter plenty of native Alemannic-speakers as well, some of whom might in fact be uneasy about speaking Standard German (mostly rural elders). All in all though, language is not a major barrier, and even a monolingual English-speaker should have no difficulty truly enjoying this sunny part of Germany. Get in thumbnail right Stuttgart (File:Stuttgart Flughafen Rollfeld Luftaufnahme 2008 by-RaBoe 02.jpg), the Land's capital, has the largest airport within Baden-Württemberg By air Stuttgart has an international airport which is served by all major carriers. Frankfurt international (FRA), the busiest airport in mainland Europe, although not in Baden Württemberg, is well within reach by train (1 hour from FRA to Stuttgart main station via the high-speed ''ICE'' connection). Low-fare airlines offer services to the local airports of Karlsruhe-Baden Baden and Friedrichshafen. Travellers beware: "Frankfurt Hahn", the big hub for low-fare airlines, should not be confused with FRA. In stark contrast, it has no train station and is in a rather remote location. It is possible to get from Hahn into Baden-Württemberg rather conveniently, but it definitely takes a lot longer and is much more hassle than from FRA. For the southern part of Baden-Württemberg, the airports in Zurich, Switzerland, and the EuroAirport Basel-Mulhouse on French (France) territory are convenient, too. By train All major cities are well connected through the Deutsche Bahn (DB) rail system. Ulm, Karlsruhe, Mannheim, Heidelberg, Stuttgart and Freiburg even have ICE connections (slick, comfortable, white high speed trains travelling at up to 250km h). Tickets can be booked via the Deutsche Bahn website. Baden-Württemberg (as well as some other regions in Germany) offers a special regional train ticket (in this case, the '''Baden-Württemberg-Ticket'''). It's valid for 18 hours from 09:00 until 03:00 the next day on any day you choose. A second class ticket for one person was priced at €23 (with each extra additional passenger just €4) in September 2014. First class tickets cost €31 with each extra additional passenger €12. The ticket can be used on all regional trains within Baden-Württemberg except InterCity(IC), InterCityExpress(ICE), EuroCity(EC) and some special trains. By bus The long-distance bus market is exploding in Germany, since a new law was passed in 2013. There are dozens of daily services from most major cities, which are often significantly cheaper than trains. Most buses offer amenities like Wi-Fi and power outlets and some can even transport bicycles. The best resource for checking connections is this German website. Get around By train and bus Baden-Württemberg has an excellent rail network, serving even quite remote areas. Especially rural villages are served by buses which generally leave from main train stations in larger towns and cities. Buses are quite frequent near big cities, but especially on weekend in rural areas there are only 2–4 bus connections a day. All connections can be checked at this website. If you're travelling within Baden-Württemberg, you can purchase the '''Baden-Württemberg-Ticket''', which will give you all-day travel in regional trains (categories S, RB, RE and IRE) within Baden-Württemberg and even to the near by cities of Basel, Lindau and Würzburg. You can use it also for private trains and most of local buses and city transport. On working days the ticket is valid 09:00-15:00 the following day. On weekends is valid from 00:01. There are five variants of Baden-Württemberg-Ticket: * '''Baden-Württemberg-Ticket Single''' (€23) -- for single traveller * '''Baden-Württemberg-Ticket''' (€23 + €4 for each additional traveller) -- for groups up to five people * '''Baden-Württemberg-Ticket Nacht''' (€20 + €4 for each additional traveller) -- for groups up to five people, valid from 6PM to 6AM the following day (7AM if the following day is weekend or public holiday) For general information about Länder-Tickets see Germany#Network_tickets. By car Of course you can always use your car. If you are travelling in the Black Forest or the Swabian Alb during winter, bring snow chains as some smaller roads may not see snow ploughs frequently enough. When travelling on the ''Autobahn'', the same precautions as everywhere on German high speed roads apply: If you're not willing (and prepared) to drive consistently above 80mph (130km h), stay on the right. Make room for people trying to overtake, use your common sense, don't drive faster than you can think. See For those interested in '''high culture''': thumb Stuttgart's museums and cultural institutions are world-famous (File:Stuttgart Kunstmuseum Königsbau Musikpavillon.jpg) *


Suzhou

to the east. The northern half looks across to Taizhou (Taizhou, Jiangsu) across the Yangtze River, while the southern half also borders the province of Zhejiang to the south. Wuxi earned its nickname "Pearl of Lake Tai" because it's built on the shore of Lake Tai in a scenic setting. Wuxi was also dubbed "little Shanghai" because of its close proximity to the city, rapid urbanization and booming economy. Wuxi also has a history of business people involved in modern Shanghai commerce since the early 20th century. Zhou Dynasty Wuxi was founded 3,000 years ago by two fugitive princes, Taibo (Wu Taibo) and Zhongyong, of the Zhou (Zhou Dynasty) from Central China, who intended to give their brother Jili (季歷) the throne. The two princes settled down in Meili (梅里), which is believed to be today's Meicun, Wuxi. (some historic records indicate a location somewhere in today's Suzhou). They helped developing local agriculture and waterways. The area soon flourished. After the death of Taibo, who had no heir, the emperor of Zhou enthroned a descendant of his family king of the State of Wu. The king named his kingdom "Gowu". Taibo's shrine was set up in today's Meicun and the original wood structure was destroyed during the wars over the course of history. However, it has been renovated several times and today's architecture dates mostly to the Qing dynasty. A stone carved with sayings by Confucius can still be seen in Taibo Shrine. Jiangyin is in the Jiangnan cultural region of China that speaks Northern Wu Chinese, which means the native Jiangyin dialect has a very high degree of mutual intelligibility with other Northern Wu Chinese dialects like those of nearby Wuxi, Suzhou, and Shanghai. Jiangyin dialect is subjectively considered to have somewhat harder sounds compared to the softer, more flowing Northern Wu Chinese dialects such as those of Wuxi and Suzhou. However, because of the government mandated use of Standard Mandarin as the modicum of instruction in the educational system and in the media, the younger generation have a native fluency in Standard Mandarin unlike the Jiangnan accented Standard Mandarin spoken by the older generation. As is becoming more common in other urban Jiangnan areas like Shanghai, this policy is leading to many younger children in urban Jiangyin only being able to understand but not speak the native Jiangyin dialect. Jiangyin is in the Jiangnan cultural region of China that speaks Northern Wu Chinese, which means the native Jiangyin dialect has a very high degree of mutual intelligibility with other Northern Wu Chinese dialects like those of nearby Wuxi, Suzhou, and Shanghai. Jiangyin dialect is subjectively considered to have somewhat harder sounds compared to the softer, more flowing Northern Wu Chinese dialects such as those of Wuxi and Suzhou. However, because of the government mandated use of Standard Mandarin as the modicum of instruction in the educational system and in the media, the younger generation have a native fluency in Standard Mandarin unlike the Jiangnan accented Standard Mandarin spoken by the older generation. As is becoming more common in other urban Jiangnan areas like Shanghai, this policy is leading to many younger children in urban Jiangyin only being able to understand but not speak the native Jiangyin dialect. Jiangyin cuisine is a member of the Jiangsu cuisine prevalent in the Jiangnan region. It is similar to neighboring Wuxi, Suzhou, and Shanghai cuisine. Like other styles of Jiangsu cuisine, Jiangyin food is sweet in comparison to other Chinese cuisines. Unlike Sichuan cuisine and Hunan cuisine, Jiangyin food is not spicy. Because of Jiangyin is right next to the Yangtze River, freshwater fish and small fresh water shrimp are commonly consumed in addition to pork. St. Anthony Parish - St. Joseph's College, Hong Kong - St. Lawrence Parish - St. Lazarus Parish - St. Paul's Co-educational College - St. Paul's College, Hong Kong - Standard Chinese - Standing Committee of the National People's Congress - Stanislas Julien - Stanley, Hong Kong - Stanley Ho Hung-sun - Stanley Kwan - Star anise - Star Ferry - State Council of China - State Economic Commission - State of Qi - State of Qin - State of Wei - State of Yan - State of Zhao - State-owned enterprise - Statue Square - Steaming - Stele Forest - Stephen Chow - Sticky rice - Stimson Doctrine - Stir frying - Stonecutter's Island - ''Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio'' - Stroke (Chinese character) - Strong Nation Forum - Struans - Su Buqing - Su Shi - Su Shun - Su Tseng-chang - Suàn shù shū - Sub-prefecture-level city - Sub-provincial city - Sui Dynasty - Suiyuan - Summer Palace - Sun Ce - ''Sun Daily'' - Sun Jian - Sun Li-jen - Sun Quan - Sun Tzu - Sun Wen (football) - Sun Wukong - Sun Yat-sen - Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall - Sun Yat-sen University - Suncake - Sung Chiao-jen - Sung Document - Sung Wong Toi - Sungshan Domestic Airport - Superpower - Supreme Military Command of PRC - Suzhou - Suzhou dialect - Sweetheart cake - Szechuan cuisine - Szechuan pepper Wenzhou natives speak Wu Chinese, which is the spoken language of the people of neighbouring Hangzhou, Suzhou, and Shanghai. However, geographic isolation and the immigration of Southern Min Chinese speakers from nearby Fujian Province, have caused Wenzhou's spoken language to evolve into a dialect that has been described as "notoriously eccentric." Wikipedia:Suzhou commons:苏州


Hangzhou

en doc 2003-08 17 content_255620.htm title "Liu Sanjie" performed in natural scenic setting publisher ''China Daily'' date 2003-08-17 accessdate 2008-08-21 ''Impression Lijiang'', in June 2006 at the foot of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain in Lijiang (Lijiang, Yunnan), Yunnan province; ''Impression West Lake'', in late 2007 at the West Lake in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province; ''Impression Hainan'' in late 2009, set in Hainan Island; and ''Impression


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