Places Known For

scale fighting


Occupation of Smyrna

of the Great Fire of Smyrna (1922) Violence against the Greek population occurred immediately after the takeover. Most notably, Chrysostomos, the Orthodox Bishop, was lynched by a mob of Turkish citizens. A few days afterward, a fire destroyed half the city and most of the Christian quarter. Culpability for the fire is blamed on all ethnic groups and clear blame remains elusive. The evacuation of Smyrna by Greek troops ended most of the large scale fighting in the Greco-Turkish war which was formally ended with an Armistice and a final treaty in 24 July 1923 with the Treaty of Lausanne. Much of the Greek population was included in the 1923 population exchange between Greece and Turkey resulting in migration to Greece and elsewhere. References


Goma

. The Congolese defence forces are unable or unwilling to stop them, and as a consequence Rwanda continues to support Banymulenge rebels such as the RCD and General Nkunda, and to carry out incursions into North Kivu in pursuit of the FDLR. In September 2007 large-scale fighting threatened to break out again as the 8,000-strong militia of General Nkunda, based around Rutshuru, broke away from integration with the Congolese army and began attacking them in the town of Masisi north-west of Goma. MONUC (United Nations Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo) began airlifting Congolese troops into Goma and transferring them by helicopter from Goma International Airport to Masisi. "Fear of fresh conflict in Congo as renegade general turns guns on government forces." Chris McGreal, ''The Guardian'', Monday September 3, 2007. Retrieved 3 September 2007. On October 27, 2008, the Battle of Goma broke out in the city between the Congolese army, supported by MONUC, and Nkunda's CNDP rebels; 200,000 refugees fled the town. Wikipedia:Goma


Ingushetia

radicals and the changing global political climate after 11 September 2001, as well as the general war weariness of the Chechen population. Large-scale fighting has been replaced by guerrilla warfare and bombings targeting federal troops and forces of the regional government, with the violence often spilling over into adjacent regions. Since 2005, the insurgency has largely shifted out of Chechnya proper and into the nearby Russian territories, such as Ingushetia and Dagestan


Grozny

after Russian air strike on airfield in Grozny, though 4 were reported to have been donated to Abkhazia by Dzhokhar Dudayev. partof First Chechen War place Grozny, Chechnya date December 31, 1994 - February 8, 1995 (small-scale fighting to March 6, 1995) The '''First Battle of Grozny''' was the Russian Army (Russian Ground Forces)'s invasion and subsequent conquest of the Chechnya Chechen


Smolensk

census, according to which the Russian population prevailed over Belarus, but the Belarusian party leadership until 1926 leaves no hope for the inclusion of Smolensk in the Belorussian SSR. In 1940, WikiPedia:Smolensk commons:Смоленск


Trincomalee

within brackets) - Lingam; Prabhakaran's bodyguard (Hungarian AK (AK-63)), Batticaloa commander Aruna (Berreta SMG (Beretta Model 38)), LTTE founder-leader Prabhakaran (Velupillai Prabhakaran) (pistol), Trincomalee commander Pulendran (AK-47), Mannar (Mannar, Sri Lanka) commander Victor (M203 (M203 grenade launcher)) and Chief of Intelligence Pottu Amman (M 16 (M16 rifle)). Mavil Aru water dispute A new crisis leading to the first large-scale fighting since


Dagestan

Chechen separatist leaders have died or have been killed, including former president Aslan Maskhadov and leading warlord and terrorist attack mastermind Shamil Basayev. Meanwhile, the fortunes of the Chechen independence movement sagged, plagued by the internal disunity between Chechen moderates and Islamist radicals and the changing global political climate after 11 September 2001, as well as the general war weariness of the Chechen population. Large-scale fighting has been


Central African Republic

, in August 1984, to force and wide-scale fighting erupted in four of the five southern Prefectures (Prefectures of Chad), counting now on the support of the Central African President André Kolingba. The Chadian National Armed Forces (FANT) acted with rare brutality, destroying many villages and making itself guilty of wide-scale massacres of civilians. But it worked: in 1985, the greatest part of the south had been subdued. '''Abba Siddick''' is a Muslim Chadian politician and revolutionary born in what was the Oubangui-Chari French colony (French colonial empires) (today Central African Republic). In passing in Chad (also a French colony then), he entered in active politics in the Chadian Progressive Party (PPT), a nationalist and radical African political party founded in 1947 and led by Gabriel Lisette. By 1958, he had left the PPT to form with others the Chadian National Union (UNT), a Muslim progressive party, but he turned quite early to the PPT and, after the independence of Chad, was minister of Education of the President François Tombalbaye. However the President's discrimination against Muslims in Chad brought him to become a member of the rebel insurgent group FROLINAT, formed in 1966 to oppose the rule of Tombalbaye. After the death of the organization's first secretary-general in 1968, a vicious battle for leadership ensued, which terminated with the victory of Siddick in 1969, even though he was perceived as an Anti-Arab and was suspected of being a moderate leftist and not having any revoultionary apprentiship. He made Tripoli the headquarters of the front; and Libya took the place of Sudan as key supplier of the FROLINAT. While he was internationally recognized as the head of the FROLINAT, he was losing control of the units on the ground. In 1971 he tried to reassert his authority by proposing to unify the insurgent forces active in Chad, but Goukouni Oueddei, head of the Second Liberation Army of the FROLINAT, broke with Siddick, who managed to at least keep a loose control over the First Liberation Army. mutations M60, M181 Page32, P85, P90, V62, V75, V78, V83, V84, V85, V90, V93, V94, V185, V197, V217, V227, V234, V237, and V44 members Baka (Baka (Cameroon and Gabon)) 63% (Gabon & Cameroon) - 72% (CAR (Central African Republic)), Hadzabe (Hadza people) (Tanzania) 52% -60%, Nuer (Nuer people) (Sudan) 50%, Mbuti (DRC (Democratic Republic of the Congo)) 33% -60%, Biaka (Aka people) (CAR (Central African Republic)) 35% -55%, Central Africa 32%, Tsumkwe San (Namibia) 31%, Khoisan 28%, Shilluk (Shilluk people) (Sudan) 27%, Burunge (Burunge people) (Tanzania) 25%, Dinka (Sudan) 23%, Ngumba (Ngumba language) (Cameroon) 23% -33%, Eviya (Eviya people) (Gabon) 21%, Fali (Fali people) (Cameroon) 18%, Sotho–Tswana (South Africa) 18%, Zulu (Zulu people) (South Africa) 17%, Eshira (Eshira people) (Gabon) 17%, Shake (Shake people) (Gabon) 16%, Hausa (Hausa people) (Sudan) 16%, Sukuma (Tanzania) 16%, Bakola (Pygmies#Groups) (Cameroon) 15% -36%, Copts (Sudan) 15%, Sudan 15%, Kunama (Kunama people) (Eritrea) 15%, Fulvio Cruciani, Beniamino Trombetta, Daniele Sellitto ''et al.'', "Human Y chromosome haplogroup R-V88: a paternal genetic record of early mid Holocene trans-Saharan connections and the spread of Chadic languages," ''European Journal of Human Genetics'' (2010), 1–8 Tutsi (Rwanda) 15%, Sandawe (Sandawe people) (Tanzania) 15%, Uldeme (Wuzlam language) (Cameroon) 5% -31%, Nuba (Sudan) 14%, Makina (Makina people) (Gabon) 14%, Southern Africa 13%, Mali 11%, Ewondo (Beti-Pahuin) (Cameroon) 10%, Ethiopia 10%, Shona (Shona people) (Zimbabwe) 10% mutations M60, M181 Page32, P85, P90, V62, V75, V78, V83, V84, V85, V90, V93, V94, V185, V197, V217, V227, V234, V237, and V44 members Baka (Baka (Cameroon and Gabon)) 63% (Gabon & Cameroon) - 72% (CAR (Central African Republic)), Hadzabe (Hadza people) (Tanzania) 52% -60%, Nuer (Nuer people) (Sudan) 50%, Mbuti (DRC (Democratic Republic of the Congo)) 33% -60%, Biaka (Aka people) (CAR (Central African Republic)) 35% -55%, Central Africa 32%, Tsumkwe San (Namibia) 31%, Khoisan 28%, Shilluk (Shilluk people) (Sudan) 27%, Burunge (Burunge people) (Tanzania) 25%, Dinka (Sudan) 23%, Ngumba (Ngumba language) (Cameroon) 23% -33%, Eviya (Eviya people) (Gabon) 21%, Fali (Fali people) (Cameroon) 18%, Sotho–Tswana (South Africa) 18%, Zulu (Zulu people) (South Africa) 17%, Eshira (Eshira people) (Gabon) 17%, Shake (Shake people) (Gabon) 16%, Hausa (Hausa people) (Sudan) 16%, Sukuma (Tanzania) 16%, Bakola (Pygmies#Groups) (Cameroon) 15% -36%, Copts (Sudan) 15%, Sudan 15%, Kunama (Kunama people) (Eritrea) 15%, Fulvio Cruciani, Beniamino Trombetta, Daniele Sellitto ''et al.'', "Human Y chromosome haplogroup R-V88: a paternal genetic record of early mid Holocene trans-Saharan connections and the spread of Chadic languages," ''European Journal of Human Genetics'' (2010), 1–8 Tutsi (Rwanda) 15%, Sandawe (Sandawe people) (Tanzania) 15%, Uldeme (Wuzlam language) (Cameroon) 5% -31%, Nuba (Sudan) 14%, Makina (Makina people) (Gabon) 14%, Southern Africa 13%, Mali 11%, Ewondo (Beti-Pahuin) (Cameroon) 10%, Ethiopia 10%, Shona (Shona people) (Zimbabwe) 10% B2b4 Haplogroup B2b4 (P7) has been observed most frequently in samples of some populations of pygmies from Central Africa: 67% (12 18) Baka from Central African Republic, 45% (14 31) Biaka from Central African Republic, 21% (10 47) Mbuti from Democratic Republic of the Congo. This haplogroup also has been found in an Iraqw (Iraqw people) (South Cushitic) individual from Tanzania (1 9 11%) and in some samples of Khoisan from Namibia (2 32 6% !Kung Sekele, 2 29 7% Tsumkwe San). E1b1a1a1e E1b1a1a1e is defined by markers M10, M66, M156 and M195. Wairak people in Tanzania tested 4.6% (2 43) positive for E-M10. E-M10 was found in a single person of the Lissongo group in the Central African Republic and two members in a "Mixed" population from the Adamawa region (Adamawa Region). According to the US conservative review ''National Interest'', Jacques Foccart played "an essential role" in the negotiation of the Cooperation accords with the newly independent African states, former members of the French Community created in 1958. These accords involved the sectors of finance and economy, culture and education, and the military. There were initially eleven countries involved: Mauritania, Senegal, Cote d'Ivoire, Dahomey (now Benin), Upper Volta (Republic of Upper Volta) (now Burkina Faso), Niger, Chad, Gabon, Central African Republic, Congo-Brazzaville, and Madagascar. Togo and Cameroon, former UN Trust Territories, as well as, later on, Mali and the former Belgian territories (Ruanda-Urundi, now Rwanda and Burundi, and Congo-Kinshasa), together with some of the ex-Portuguese territories (Portuguese Colonial War), and Comoros and Djibouti, which had also been under French rule for many years but became independent in the 1970s, were also later included. The situation allarmed the country's neighbours, worried of a possible spill-over; as a result, already on February 16 the Sudanese minister Izz Eldine Hamed had arrived in N'Djamena where he negotiated a ceasefire among the rival factions. The Sudanese proposed organizing a peace conference in neutral territory, and Nigeria's President Olusegun Obasanjo offered Kano, in Northern Nigeria, as seat for the conference. He also invited as observers Chad's neighbouring countries (Libya, Sudan, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Niger). * The President of Pakistan, Pervez Musharraf, shakes hands with the Prime Minister of Israel, Ariel Sharon, the first time such an encounter has been made in public. (BBC) * UN High Commissioner for Refugees and World Food Programme appeal for more funds to provide food for two million refugees in Africa, in countries such as Tanzania, Central African Republic, Liberia and Kenya. (Reuters) * Mandatory emergency evacuation is ordered for Outer Banks in North Carolina as Hurricane Ophelia (2005 Atlantic hurricane season) approaches. (Washington Post), (Reuters), (Guardian) Chad is a landlocked country in central Africa bordered by Libya to the north, Sudan to the east, the Central African Republic to the south, Cameroon and Nigeria to the southwest, and Niger to the west. Chad is divided into three major geographical regions: a desert zone in the north, an arid Sahelian belt in the centre and a more fertile Sudanese (Sudan (region)) savanna zone in the south. - Central African Republic Commons:Category:Central African Republic WikiPedia:Central African Republic Dmoz:Regional Africa Central African Republic


Guernsey

French. In Britain Although Brock's achievements were overshadowed by larger-scale fighting in Europe, his death was still widely noted, particularly in Guernsey. In London, he is remembered at a memorial in St Paul's Cathedral, paid for by £1575 voted by the House of Commons (British House of Commons), which also granted pensions of £200 to each of his four surviving brothers. For his actions in the capture of Siege of Detroit


Mauritius

open wire and microwave relay network. The international system employs a radiotelephone system, with connections to Comoros, France and Madagascar. A new microwave relay station to Mauritius is also in use, along with one Intelsat satellite-earth station. After Trafalgar, large-scale fighting at sea was limited to the destruction of small, fugitive French squadrons and amphibious operations which again captured the colonies which had been restored at Amiens


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017