Places Known For

religious training


Mahabad

going through the elementary school of Saadat in Mahabad and completing his religious training at the Shaikh Borhan's Khanaqah in the village of Sharafkand, Hemin joined the Kurdish Resurrection Party (Komeley Jiyanewey Kurd), founded in 1942. This was the first Kurdish political organization with a clear ambition for the establishment of an independent Greater Kurdistan. During the WWII when the Red Army invaded parts of northern Iran, including most of Azarbaijan and parts of Kurdistan, KJK changed its name to Kurdish Democratic Party and declared the first Kurdish republic with Mahabad as its capital. Mukriyani, along with his best friend Abd-al-Rahman Sharafkandi (Hazhar), was named the Kurdish national poet of the Republic of Mahabad, and became the secretary of Haji Baba Shaikh (Hadschi Baba Scheich), the prime minister and head of the self-proclaimed Republic. He fled the oppression that followed the downfall of the Republic in December 1946 and he took refuge in Sulaimaniya in Iraqi Kurdistan, where he was arrested. He was released after a while. After the agreements of 11 March 1970, which allowed the Kurdish insurgents and Baghdad's central government a four years' respite, Hemin settled down in Baghdad and became an active member of the Kurdish Academy of Science. birth_date 1920 birth_place Mahabad, Eastern Kurdistan death_date 1991 Biography Hejar was born in the city of Mahabad in north-western Iran. He began religious studies in early childhood, but was forced to abandon it when he lost his father at the age of 17. He started writing poems in Kurdish (Kurdish language) around 1940. Through his readings, he came under the influence of famous Kurdish poets such as Malaye Jaziri, Ahmad Khani, Wafaei and Haji Qadir Koyi. He was involved in the Kurdish movement led by Qazi Muhammad and was appointed as one of the official poets of the Republic of Mahabad in 1947. After the fall of the republic, he was forced into exile. For about 30 years, he lived in different countries such as Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. In Iraq, he became involved in the nationalist movement led by Mustafa Barzani, with whom he developed a close friendship. In 1975, after the defeat of the movement, he moved back to Iran, and settled in the city of Karaj, where he lived until his death on February 22, 1990. He is buried in his home town of Mahabad. DATE OF BIRTH 1920 PLACE OF BIRTH Mahabad, Eastern Kurdistan DATE OF DEATH February 22, 1990 Early life and career Nali was born in Khaku-Khol, a village belongs to Sharbajer area or Shahrazur or Sharazur in Sulaimany, Kurdistan region of Iraq. As was the custom in the old days in Kurdistan, he started studying the Quran first and Arabic language in mosques in Kurdistan, then he became a Faqi. “Faqi is a Mullah’s student, which is the name of students in mosques. During the process of becoming a Faqi, he visited many cities in the whole of Kurdistan or Iran and Iraq, cities like; Sennah, Mahabad, Halabja, and Sulaimany. In Qaradakh he studied under Shaikh Muhammed Ibin al Khayat, in Sulaimany in Saiyd Hasan Mosque, he studied under Mullah Abdoullah Rash, also in Qaradax he studied mathematics under Shaikh Ali Mullah. He spent long time in the Khanaqa of Mawlana Khalid in Sulaimany. He also studied under Shaikh Awla Kharpani. '''Wafaei''' or '''Wefayî''', (1844-1902), was a Kurdish (Kurdish people) poet. His real name was ''Abdorrahim''. He was born in Mahabad in present-day north-western Iran. He finished religious studies in Mahabad and became a cleric, and a teacher in the local school. He moved to Sulaimaniya in 1900 and stayed there for a while. He travelled to Mecca three times, the last one in 1902. He was accompanied by the Kurdish poet Piramerd. During his last pilgrimage, he became ill and died in the region between Iraq and Syria. Since Mamle was a Kurdish political activist, he was arrested several times by the Iranian government. He died on the 13 January 1999 at the age of 74 in the Kurdish city of Mahabad, and was buried there in the Budak Sultan graves. He is very popular in all over Kurdistan region especially in his hometown Mahabad and the neighuring Piranshahr. Kurdish Women in Iran During World War I, Kurdish women suffered from attacks of Russian and Turkish armies. In 1915, Russian army massacred the male population of Mahabad and abused two hundred women. Reza Shah issued his decree for coercive unveiling of women in 1936. According to government correspondence, there was no need for unveiling in Kurdistan (Iranian Kurdistan), since women were usually unveiled. Nevertheless, government treated the colorful traditional Kurdish female custome as ''ugly and dirty'' and it had to be replaced with ''civilized''(i.e. Western) dress. Kurds called this forced dress as Ajami rather than European. ''Violence and culture: Confidential records about the abolition of hijab 1934-1943'', Iran National Archives, Tehran, 1992, pp.171, 249-250, 273. The Solitude of the Stateless: Kurdish Women at the Margins of Feminist Knowledge On July 13, unconfirmed reports began to emerge of a general strike in the four largely-Kurdish (w:Kurdish people) provinces in the north-west of Iran which make up Iranian Kurdistan (w:Iranian Kurdistan). Videos showed empty, deserted streets and shuttered shops in Mahabad (w:Mahabad), Saghez (w:Saghez) and other Kordestani cities. The reports of the strike coincide with the twentieth anniversary of the murder of Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou (w:Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou), the leader of the Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran (w:Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran) (PDKI).


Republic of Mahabad

of Saadat in Mahabad and completing his religious training at the Shaikh Borhan's Khanaqah in the village of Sharafkand, Hemin joined the Kurdish Resurrection Party (Komeley Jiyanewey Kurd), founded in 1942. This was the first Kurdish political organization with a clear ambition for the establishment of an independent Greater Kurdistan. During the WWII when the Red Army invaded parts of northern Iran, including most of Azarbaijan and parts of Kurdistan, KJK changed its name to Kurdish Democratic Party and declared the first Kurdish republic with Mahabad as its capital. Mukriyani, along with his best friend Abd-al-Rahman Sharafkandi (Hazhar), was named the Kurdish national poet of the Republic of Mahabad, and became the secretary of Haji Baba Shaikh (Hadschi Baba Scheich), the prime minister and head of the self-proclaimed Republic. He fled the oppression that followed the downfall of the Republic in December 1946 and he took refuge in Sulaimaniya in Iraqi Kurdistan, where he was arrested. He was released after a while. After the agreements of 11 March 1970, which allowed the Kurdish insurgents and Baghdad's central government a four years' respite, Hemin settled down in Baghdad and became an active member of the Kurdish Academy of Science. Biography Hejar was born in the city of Mahabad in north-western Iran. He began religious studies in early childhood, but was forced to abandon it when he lost his father at the age of 17. He started writing poems in Kurdish (Kurdish language) around 1940. Through his readings, he came under the influence of famous Kurdish poets such as Malaye Jaziri, Ahmad Khani, Wafaei and Haji Qadir Koyi. He was involved in the Kurdish movement led by Qazi Muhammad and was appointed as one of the official poets of the Republic of Mahabad in 1947. After the fall of the republic, he was forced into exile. For about 30 years, he lived in different countries such as Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. In Iraq, he became involved in the nationalist movement led by Mustafa Barzani, with whom he developed a close friendship. In 1975, after the defeat of the movement, he moved back to Iran, and settled in the city of Karaj, where he lived until his death on February 22, 1990. He is buried in his home town of Mahabad. Republic of Mahabad encouraged women's participation in public life and KDPI launched a political party for women which promoted education for females and rallied their support for the republic. S. Mojab, ''Women and Nationalism in the Kurdish Republic of 1946'' in Women of a non-state nation, The Kurds, ed. by Shahrzad Mojab, Costa Mesa Publishers, 2001, pp.71-91 In August 1979, the Iranian Army launched an offensive to destroy the autonomist movement in Kurdistan (Iranian Kurdistan). Kurdish organizations such as Komala recruited hundreds of women into their military and political ranks. Within its own camps, Komala abolished gender segregation and women took part in combat and military training. ***My judgement is based on the following: - there exists an article called History of the Kurds and in this article is a section called History_of_the_Kurds#Modern_History_of_the_Kurds with a link to a main article called Modern history of the Kurds which is currently redlinked. The section in question covers the period 1828-present day. There currently isn't any reference to the two items of information in Kingdom of Kurdistan which are an attempt at independence from the British mandate which did not last long and an attempt at independence from Turkey which did not last long. These two pieces of information are part of the modern history of the Kurds and should be referenced there. An article about independence struggles in Kurdistan would have more than just two basic pieces of information and would not be called Kingdom of Kurdistan. There should in my view be an article on the modern history of Kurdistan and at most, the information presented in Kingdom of Kurdistan would be a small section within that. MLA (User:MLA) 19:32, 2 March 2006 (UTC) ****The key words in your kind reply are "redlinked" and "should", which only confirm my opinion that the nomination for deletion was a bit of misunderstanding. You just don't delete information from wikipedia just because it should be a part of the article which '''does not exist''' yet. I am not in a position to evaluate the validity of the term "Kingdom of Kurdistan"; I may understand the position that if someone proclaims himself King, this does not necessarily mean that there is a "Kingdom". But this is a different issue, and again, you just '''don't''' delete a correct and significant information from wikipedia. We already have an article about Republic of Mahabad, which was just as shortlived. Mukadderat (User:Mukadderat) 22:19, 2 March 2006 (UTC) *****Hmm.... Republic of Mahabad was also called kingdom of kurdistan... I for one am confused in this flood of 3 kingdoms with identical titles. Even a disambiguation page would be hard to create. Since all 3 of the kingdoms existed ceased to exist repetively in the same time period. It is perfectly fine to explain this under a "modern hostory of kurds" rather than pathetic individual articles that cannot grow beyond stubs. Each article can hardly fill a stub.


Nouakchott

desertification has sapped much of the community's economic energy, it remains the most important center of religious training in Mauritania. Its Qur'anic school is known for its library of manuscripts, set up by Shaykh Sidiyya "al-Kabir" (1774–1868), which is second only to the collection found in the ancient Mauritanian city of Chinguetti. A unique copy of a grammar by Averroes was recently found there. File:A320 AfriqiyahAirways EDDL.JPG thumb Afriqiyah


Mauritania

, it remains the most important center of religious training in Mauritania. Its Qur'anic school is known for its library of manuscripts, set up by Shaykh Sidiyya "al-Kabir" (1774–1868), which is second only to the collection found in the ancient Mauritanian city of Chinguetti. A unique copy of a grammar by Averroes was recently found there. '''Boutilimit''' ( ) lies 164 km south east of Mauritania's capital of Nouakchott

. The town has been an important center of religious scholarship and training since its founding by an Islamic mystic and scholar in the 19th Century. Although desertification has sapped much of the community's economic energy, it remains the most important center of religious training in Mauritania. Its Qur'anic school is known for its library of manuscripts, set up by Shaykh Sidiyya "al-Kabir" (1774–1868), which is second only to the collection found in the ancient


Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

url https: web.archive.org web 20140714145246 http: www.clarionproject.org news armed-children-young-9-patrolling-streets-mosul title Armed Children as Young as 9 Patrolling Streets of Mosul date 3 July 2014 publisher The Clarion Project accessdate 9 July 2014 According to a report by the magazine Foreign Policy, children as young as six are recruited or kidnapped and sent to military and religious training camps, where they practise beheading with dolls and are indoctrinated


Lhasa

, as the reincarnation (Tibetan Buddhism) of the 4th Samdhong Rinpoche and enthroned in Gaden Dechenling Monastery at Jol. Two years later he took vows as a monk, started his religious training at Drepung Monastery in Lhasa and completed it at the Madhyamika School of Buddhism. But in 1950, after the Chinese invasion of Tibet, he was forced to go into exile in India along with the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (14th Dalai Lama). Geshe Wangyal


Hesse

authority still continued, however. To put an end to them, Philip was declared of age in 1518, his actual assumption of power beginning the following year. The power of the Estates had been broken by his mother, but he owed her little else. His education had been very imperfect, and his moral and religious training had been neglected. Despite all this, he developed rapidly as a statesman, and soon began to take steps to increase his personal authority as a ruler. '''Reichelsheim''' is a town


Mecca

scholarship in West Africa. In addition to religious training, the schools of Chinguetti taught students rhetoric, law, astronomy, mathematics, and medicine. For many centuries all of Mauritania was popularly known in the Arab world as Bilad Shinqit, "the land of Chinguetti." Chinguetti is locally said to be the seventh most holy city of Islam. There is no recognition of this claim outside of West Africa, but whatever its ranking, the city remains one of the world's most


Lahore

in Afghanistan, according to several informants. He may also have attended an anti-American religious training center in Lahore, Pakistan as a follower of Mubarak Ali Gilani. WikiPedia:Lahore


Bristol

his religious training at the Lichfield Theological College. Kausman was born and spent his formative years in Devon, UK, before moving to Bristol in 1985 as a teenager. An early interest in House music house and hardcore (breakbeat hardcore) lead to a musical partnership with friend Jody Wisternoff (who later formed Way Out West (Way Out West (band)) with Nick Warren). Recording together under the aliases of Tru Funk and Sub Love on Three Stripe Records, they created hardcore staples like 4am and made numerous DJ (Disc jockey)ing appearances at early Universe raves. He then studied under William Thomas, rector of Ubley and a puritan divine; Bull, however, was more influenced by his son Samuel Thomas, who directed Bull to read Richard Hooker, Henry Hammond, and Jeremy Taylor. On leaving Thomas, Bull applied to Robert Skinner, the ejected bishop of Oxford, for episcopal ordination, and was ordained by him deacon and priest the same day, aged 21. After his ordination he took the small living of St. George's, near Bristol. Bull, like Robert Sanderson and others, used the church prayers, which he knew by heart, without the book. He used to spend two months every year at Oxford and on his way there and back he visited Sir William Master of Abbey House, Cirencester. He met in this way the rector Alexander Gregory, whose daughter Bridget he married on Ascension day, 1658. In the same year he was presented to the rectory of Suddington St. Mary's, near Cirencester, through the influence of Lady Pool, the lady of the manor. In 1659 the rectory at Suddington became one of the many places of meeting at which the friends of the exiled dynasty assembled to concert measures for the restoration of Charles II of England. Despite this rather turbulent beginning to his life, Allen made a good start. After first attending Clifton College in Bristol (having won a scholarship to do so), he gained admittance to St John's College (St John's College, Cambridge) at Cambridge University (University of Cambridge). He graduated with a BA (Bachelor of Arts) in 1877. Commons:Category:Bristol Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Bristol Wikipedia:Bristol


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