Places Known For

realistic style


Ganja, Azerbaijan

in Ganja (Ganja, Azerbaijan) is considered the greatest romantic epic poet in Persian literature, who brought a colloquial and realistic style to the Persian epic. Encyclopædia Britannica, "Nezami" Dr. Julie Scott Meisami, ''"The Haft Paykar: A Medieval Persian Romance (Oxford World's Classics)", Oxford University Pr. (Oxford University) (T), 1995, ISBN 0-19-283184-4, extract His heritage is widely appreciated and shared by Azerbaijan, Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan. date accessdate In 752, the city was destroyed by the Sabir people, who lived not far from the city and deprecated the Arabs. In 854, the Muslim Khazars took refuge in re-established Shamkir. Later, the city was under the reign of Ganja (Ganja, Azerbaijan) amirs from the Kurdish (History of the Kurdish people) dynasty of Shaddadids. In XII century-in the beginning of the XIII centuries Shamkir was under the Georgian (Georgia (country)) reign. In 1195, the Georgian Queen Tamar (Tamar of Georgia)’s commanders destroyed the troops of Azerbaijan’s Atabey (Eldiguzids (Atabegs of Azerbaijan)) Abu-Bakr, who was from Seljuk (Great Seljuq Empire) dynasty of the Ildegizids (Eldiguzids (Atabegs of Azerbaijan)). In 1235, Shamkir was destroyed by Mongolian (Mongols) noyon Molar. From the first quarter of the XVI century till the beginning of the XIX century Shamkir was governed by hereditary rulers of Azerbaijani (Qizilbash) tribe called Shamsaddinli-Zulgadar. In 1803, during the military actions against Ganja khanate, Shamkir was taken up by Russian troops and annexed to Russia. On September 3, 1826, during the Russo-Iran war Shakh’s guard consisting of 10000 soldiers was destroyed under Shamkir. In 1818, a German (Germany) colony, resettled from Wurttemberg (Kingdom of Württemberg) to Annenfeld appeared in the territory of Shamkir. From 1914 the city was called Annino, but from 1938-Shamkhor. , literally "Azerbaijan Village Agriculture Academy"), also referred to as the Azerbaijan Agricultural Academy (Az. AA), is a public university located in Ganja (Ganja, Azerbaijan), Azerbaijan. The university has eight schools, 3830 students and 560 faculty members. In addition, there is a teaching site in Gazakh with nearly 500 correspondent students. Biography Babadzhanian was born in the family of an Armenian (Armenians) peasant, in the village of Chardakhlu (Çardaqlı, Shamkir) near Yelizavetpol (later Kirovabad, now Ganja (Ganja, Azerbaijan), Azerbaijan), then part of the Russian Empire, attending school there. Ivan Bagramyan, another Armenian Marshal of the Soviet Union, was born in the same village. History During the Soviet period, Azerbaijan was part of the Transcaucasus Military District, whose forces in the republic were commanded by the 4th Army (4th Army (Soviet Union)). The 4th Army (4th Army (Soviet Union)) consisted of three motor rifle divisions (the 23rd Motor Rifle Division (8th Cavalry Corps (Soviet Union)#Postwar) (MRD) at Ganja (Ganja, Azerbaijan), the 60th at Lankaran, and the 295th in Baku) and army troops that included missile and air defense brigades and artillery and rocket regiments. Azerbaijan also hosted the 49th Arsenal of the Main Agency of Missiles and Artillery of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, which contained over 7,000 train-car loads of ammunition to the excess of one billion units. In addition, the 75th Motor Rifle Division, part of the 7th Guards Army, was in Nakhichevan Autonomous Republic.


Edo

of the ''kizewamono'' (生世話物) form, a form defined by plays of a more realistic style than the earlier ''sewamono'' form, and set in Tsuruya and Mokuami's contemporary 19th century Edo, rather than Osaka. In 1843, he became the standing playwright for the Kawarazaki-za theatre, and began working with kabuki star Ichikawa Kodanji IV in 1854, producing ''kizewamono'' pieces. Most of Mokuami's works are in this form, and were written specifically for the star actors of the time, such as Onoe Kikugorō V and Ichikawa Kodanji IV. Many of his plays, such as the famous ''Benten Kozō'', featured thieves and robbers, also known as ''shiranami'' (white waves), who he represented somewhat sympathetically, as low-class heroes, or as tragic figures. The Edo Shogunate's edicts banning Christianity were still on the books, however, and thus the religion continued to be persecuted up to 1867, the last year of its rule. Robert Bruce Van Valkenburgh, the American minister-resident in Japan, privately complained of this persecution to the Nagasaki magistrates, though little action was taken to stop it. The succeeding Meiji government initially continued in this vein and several thousand people were exiled (Urakami Yoban Kuzure). After Europe and the U.S. began to vocally criticize the persecution, the Japanese government realized that it needed to lift the ban in order to attain its interests. In 1873 the ban was lifted. Numerous exiles returned and began construction of the Urakami Cathedral, which was completed in 1895. As a cultural phenomenon, the literature of this period records concerted attempts to distill the aggregate characteristics of the inhabitants of Edo (''Edokko'') into a generalized thumbnail description. These traits (''Edokko katagi'') were put into use to draw a contrast between Edokko and those who didn't have this "sophisticated" gloss -— those not from the city, as in merchants from the Kyoto-Osaka (Kansai) region or samurai from distant provinces. Sometimes ''Edokko katagi'' was presented with pride; and it was used mockingly. Nara, Hiroshi. (2004). ''The Structure of Detachment: the Aesthetic Vision of Kuki Shūzō with a translation of "Iki no kōzō,"'' p. 1. * '''1695''' (''Genroku 8, 8th month''): Minting begun of ''Genroku'' coinage. The shogunate placed the Japanese character ''gen'' (元) on the obverse of copper coins, the same character used today in China for the yuan (Chinese yuan). There is no connection between those uses, however. * '''1695''' (''Genroku 8, 11th month''): First kennel is established for stray dogs in Edo. In this context, Tokugawa Tsunayoshi comes to be nicknamed "the Dog Shogun" thumb left Map of Kyoto and immediate vicinity, circa 1696. Like most early Japanese maps, this map does not have a firm directional orientation, rather all text radiates out from the center. (File:1696 Genroku 9 (early Edo) Japanese Map of Kyoto, Japan - Geographicus - Kyoto-genroku9-1696.jpg) Events of the ''Tenna'' era * '''1681''' (''Tenna 1''): In Edo, the investiture of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi as the fifth shogun of the Edo bakufu (Tokugawa shogunate). Titsingh, p. 414. * '''February 5, 1681''' (''Tenna 1, 28th day of the 12th month'') : The Great ''Tenna'' Fire in Edo. Titsingh, p. 415. * '''1655''' (''Meireki 1''): The ex-Emperor went for the first time to Shugakuin Rikyū. Ponsonby-Fane, Richard. (1956). ''Kyoto: the Old Capital, 794-1869'', p. 318. * '''March 2–3, 1657''' (''Meireki 3, 18th-19th days of the 1st month'') : The city of Edo was devastated by a violent fire (Great Fire of Meireki). is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


Works Progress Administration

Progress Administration WPA art programs in New York. During the early years of 306, Alston focused on mastering portraiture (Portrait painting). Early works such as ''Portrait of a Man'' (1929) show Alston's detailed and realistic style depicted through pastels and charcoals, inspired by the style of Winold Reiss. In his ''Girl in a Red Dress'' (1934) and ''The Blue Shirt'' (1935), he used modern and innovative techniques for his portraits of young individuals in Harlem. ''Blue Shirt


Weimar Republic

;!--Not bolded, tagged with -- to establish a liberal democracy in Germany. unreferenced section, needs more footnotes In 1937 the publication and success of ''Wolf unter Wölfen'' (''Wolf Among Wolves'') marked Fallada's temporary return to his serious, realistic style. The Nazis read the book as a sharp criticism of the Weimar Republic, and thus naturally approved. Notably, Joseph Goebbels called it "a super book". Williams, 186. ref>


Afghanistan

romantic epic poet in Persian literature, who brought a colloquial and realistic style to the Persian epic. Neẓāmī." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 28 Feb. 2009 excerpt: ''Greatest romantic epic poet in Persian Literature, who brought a colloquial and realistic style to the Persian epic.'' .... ''Nezami is admired in Persian-speaking lands for his originality and clarity of style, though his love of language for its own sake and of philosophical and scientific learning makes his work difficult for the average reader.'' His heritage is widely appreciated and shared by Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Iran, Kurdistan region http: books.google.no books?id Pzg8AAAAIAAJ&pg PA34&dq nizami+kurdish&hl en&sa X&ei TzENT8qiD-eM4gTwkuSIBg&redir_esc y#v onepage&q nizami%20kurdish&f false http: books.google.no books?id 4JAMMH80Bk4C&pg PT22&dq nezami+kurdish&hl en&sa X&ei AzENT4DNLuT54QSxpriUBg&redir_esc y#v onepage&q nezami%20kurdish&f false http: azargoshnasp.net Pasokhbehanirani NezamiUSSRpoliticization.htm and Tajikistan. Marsden complained bitterly that he had been subjected to late night physical attacks by some Labour Whips, which were vigorously denied. John Pilger: Tony Blair's great betrayal 30 04 02 BBC News Colleagues 'attacked' me, says MP 05 12 01 Five days later, he defected (crossing the floor) to the Liberal Democrats on 10 December 2001, citing his disagreements with Labour whips over his opposition to military action in Afghanistan and the resulting civilian casualties. ''The Independent'' report leaving Labour 11 12 01 ''The Guardian'' Key quotes from Paul Marsden 10 12 01 By crossing the floor of the House of Commons (House of Commons of the United Kingdom), his actions contributed to a parliamentary vote being granted before the 2003 Iraq war. Commons:Category:Afghanistan WikiPedia:Afghanistan Dmoz:Regional Asia Afghanistan


Salt Lake City

when Kieth left after the fifth issue. Tousley, Nancy (October 12, 1991). "Artist draws a 'cinema for the page'", ''Calgary Herald'', p. B9. He drew eleven issues, all but one inked by Malcolm Jones III, and his understated, realistic style did much to establish the tone of the series. He co-created the popular character Death (Death (Sandman)), whom he based on Cinamon, a girl he knew from the dance clubs in Salt Lake City, Utah (Gaiman had


Bavaria

he moved to the isolated Bavarian countryside. Living among peasants, he depicted his neighbors in everyday scenes devoid of sentimentality or anecdote. The sketchlike quality of his painting was replaced by greater precision and attention to drawing. Living from 1878 to 1882 in Berbling, he painted perhaps his best-known work, the ''Three Women in Church'' (Kunsthalle, Hamburg). Its intensely realistic style recalls Hans Holbein (Hans Holbein the Younger) in its clarity of definition


Mexico City

Mexico. Production Shortly after ''The Living Daylights'' was released, producer Albert R. Broccoli and writers Michael G. Wilson and Richard Maibaum started discussing its successor. The film would retain a realistic style, as well as showing the "darker edge" of the Bond character. For the primary location, the producers wanted a place where the series had not yet visited. While China was visited after an invitation by its government


Bulgaria

Cup on four occasions. *In Bulgarian cuisine, Chubritza is the Bulgarian word for Summer savory; it is widely used as a spice. *In music, there are two groups carrying this name: Chubritza (band) is the name of a Californian band, while Čubrica (ensemble) is the name of a Dutch ensemble. Both perform Bulgarian folk (folk music) music. From the 90's Superlópez adventures take place in real scenarios that are drawn using a realistic style. Famous buildings


Tokyo

Takashi Matsumoto (CEO) Life and career Mokuami was born in the Nihonbashi district of Edo (modern-day Tokyo), and at the age of 20, entered into an apprenticeship under Tsuruya Nanboku IV, the pioneer of the ''kizewamono'' (生世話物) form, a form defined by plays of a more realistic style than the earlier ''sewamono'' form, and set in Tsuruya and Mokuami's contemporary 19th century Edo, rather than Osaka. In 1843, he became the standing playwright for the Kawarazaki-za theatre, and began working with kabuki star Ichikawa Kodanji IV in 1854, producing ''kizewamono'' pieces. Most of Mokuami's works are in this form, and were written specifically for the star actors of the time, such as Onoe Kikugorō V and Ichikawa Kodanji IV. Many of his plays, such as the famous ''Benten Kozō'', featured thieves and robbers, also known as ''shiranami'' (white waves), who he represented somewhat sympathetically, as low-class heroes, or as tragic figures. Fitted out with extra deck guns for her eleventh war patrol, ''Haddock'' sailed in company with submarines WikiPedia:Tokyo Dmoz:Regional Asia Japan Prefectures Tokyo Commons:Category:Tokyo


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