Places Known For

radical social


Travancore

tigers — were largely avoided by Neolithic humans. More than a millennium of overseas contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Kochi (Perumpadapu Swaroopam) and Travancore — and spurred by such leaders

and wetlands — then thick with malaria-bearing mosquitoes and man-eating tigers (Bengal tiger) — were largely avoided by Neolithic humans. More than a millennium of overseas contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Perumpadapu

. More than a millennium of overseas contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Kochi (Perumpadapu Swaroopam) and Travancore — and spurred by such leaders as Narayana Guru and Chattampi Swamikal — were continued by post


Maldives

than a millennium of overseas contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Kochi (Perumpadapu Swaroopam) and Travancore — and spurred by such leaders as Narayana Guru and Chattampi Swamikal — were continued

and wetlands — then thick with malaria-bearing mosquitoes and man-eating tigers (Bengal tiger) — were largely avoided by Neolithic humans. More than a millennium of overseas contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Perumpadapu

by Neolithic humans. More than a millennium of overseas contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Kochi (Perumpadapu Swaroopam) and Travancore — and spurred by such leaders as Narayana Guru and Chattampi Swamikal &mdash


Kaliningrad

death_date Youth Kollwitz was born as '''Käthe Schmidt''' in Königsberg (now Kaliningrad, Russia), East Prussia, the fifth child in her family. Her father, Karl Schmidt, was a radical Social democrat who became a mason and house builder. Her mother, Katherina Schmidt, was the daughter of Julius Rupp, a Lutheran pastor who was expelled from the official Evangelical State Church in Prussia and founded an independent


Porto Alegre

Chávez was first elected under the provisions of the 1961 Constitution in the presidential election (Venezuelan presidential election, 1998) of 6 December 1998. Chávez had been contemplating a constitutional convention for Venezuela as an ideal means to rapidly bring about sweeping and radical social change to Venezuela beginning from the eve of his 1992 coup attempt. Chávez would state later that: Punk The Brazilian punk rock (Punk in Brazil) scene was born in the late 1970s in São Paulo and Brasília with Restos de Nada (:pt:Restos de Nada), AI-5 (:pt:AI-5 (banda)), Joelho de Porco (:pt:Joelho de Porco), Condutores de Cadáver (:pt:Condutores de Cadáver), and Aborto Elétrico, among others. The first show was in 1978 in São Paulo and the punk "boom" was when the 1980s began, with Inocentes, Cólera, Ratos de Porão, Garotos Podres, Plebe Rude, ''Ignoze'', Olho Seco (:pt:Olho Seco), Mercenárias, Lobotomia, Ulster (:pt:Ulster (banda)), Fogo Cruzado, Coquetel Molotov (:pt:Coquetel Molotov (banda)) (from Rio de Janeiro), Replicantes (:pt:Os Replicantes) (from Porto Alegre), Devotos (:pt:Devotos) (or ''Devotos do Ódio'', from Recife), Beijo AA Força (from Curitiba), and many others, mostly from São Paulo (São Paulo (city)). - Porto Alegre WikiPedia:Porto Alegre commons:Porto Alegre


Kingston, Ontario

of sociology. He considers himself to be critically involved with the broader question of the articulation of social subjects with group identities such as those offered up by nations, states, and corporations. He is particularly interested in the possibilities for radical social change via the construction of alternative dual power communities and polities especially in situations of indigenous resistance, queer and feminist organizing and anti-globalisation activism. http


NKVD

in a concentration camp. In 1943, Luckyj joined the British army and worked as a Russian interpreter in occupied Germany. On 22 July 1944 the Manifesto of the Polish Committee of National Liberation (PKWN Manifesto) was published, announcing radical social, political and economic reform, continuation of the fight against Nazi Germany, nationalisation of industry and a "decent border in the West (Oder-Neisse line)". It also proclaimed the PKWN to be "the only legitimate Polish government", thus formally rejecting the Polish government in exile. Soon afterwards, the Soviet Union started to transfer power in the Soviet-controlled areas of Lublin (Lublin Voivodship), Białystok (Białystok Voivodeship (1919-1939)), Rzeszów (Rzeszów Voivodship) and Warsaw Voivodships to the PKWN. Actual control over those areas remained in the hands of the NKVD and the Red Army, however. Beginning August 1, 1944, the Committee was officially headquartered in Lublin. Nikolai Bulganin represented Soviet administration. New Donskoy Cemetery A large new necropolis was inaugurated in the 20th century just outside the monastery walls. Sergey Muromtsev was among the first notables to be interred there. After the Russian Revolution (Russian Revolution (1917)), scores of Soviet soldiers killed during the Battle of Moscow and people executed by NKVD were secretly buried as well. In 1927 the former church of St. Seraphim (Saint Seraphim), situated at the New Donskoy Cemetery, was rebuilt to become the first crematorium in Moscow. Most of the mortal remains buried at the New Donskoy Cemetery are therefore interred in urns. The church featured extended vaults which seemed suitable to accommodate the technical equipment for the cremation of bodies. The new crematorium was opened in October 1927 and most of the individuals buried in the Kremlin Wall Necropolis were cremated here. Until the mid 1970s the Donskoy crematorium remained the only one of its kind in Moscow. Notable people whose remains are interred at the New Donskoy Cemetery include *Rudolf Abel (1903–1971) Civilian branches On occupying Poland and installaing a puppet government, the Soviet Union created new Polish intelligence and internal-security agencies. The Soviet special services had begun training Polish officers as early as 1943. That year, some 120 Poles had begun training at an NKVD school in Kuybyshev (now Samara (Samara, Russia)). At the same time, in NKVD-NKGB schools all over the USSR, hundreds of Germans, Romanians, Czechoslovaks (Czechoslovakia) and Bulgarians had also undergone the same training in order to prepare them for work in future special services in their respective countries. In 1939 he was arrested by the Soviets and placed in a POW camp in Starobielsk J.K.Zawodny ''Death in the Forest'' Notre Dame, 1962 Page 145 ''The Crime of Katyn'' Polish Cultural Foundation, 1989 ISBN 0 85065 190 5 Page 19 . Along with other Polish POWs, he was murdered by the NKVD in April 1940 near Kharkov, in the Katyn Massacres J.K.Zawodny ''Death in the Forest'' Notre Dame, 1962 Page 146 . History According to its publisher, Fargat Nurutdinov, the Cäğfär Taríxı was written in its present form in Bashkortostan, by Baxşi İman, secretary of Cäğfär, the leader of a Volga Bulgar liberation movement that supposedly flourished there at the time. Nurutdinov states that the original, written in "Bulgar Turkic" (here equated with the language of the Volga Tatars (Tatar language)), in the Arabic script, was translated into Russian in the late 1930s by his uncle I.M.-K.-Nigmatullin, who did this in order to save it from an NKVD campaign of confiscation and destruction of old Bulgar documents written in the Arabic script. The manuscript containing the Tatar text was destroyed by NKVD agents. Nigmatullin himself was killed in World War II, and the translation was preserved by his mother, who eventually passed it over to her grandson, Nurutdinov, in 1976. He managed to copy parts of the translation, but the original translation and some of the copies were stolen from his father's country house in the 1980s by unknown perpetrators. Finally, Nurutdinov published the remaining text. The preface of the book After the Polish Defensive War (Invasion of Poland (1939)) of 1939 and the outbreak of the town was briefly occupied by Nazi Germany, after which it was transferred to the Soviet Union. During the Soviet occupation many of the local inhabitants were sent to the Gulag camps; there was also a notable NKVD prison located in the town. In 1941, after the end of the Nazi-Soviet Alliance and the outbreak of the Russo-German War (Operation Barbarossa), the town was again occupied by Germany and attached to the so-called Distrikt Galizien of the General Government. Before World War II Brzezany's Jewish population was about 4,000, while after 1939 this population tripled with an additional 8,000 Jews, refugees from eastern German territories. On 12 June 1943 the Nazis murdered almost all the Jews from the Brzezany ghetto and work camp at the local cemetery; only a few escaped. Between 1942 and the end of the war there was heavy partisan activity in the area, mostly by local branches of the Armia Krajowa. In 1924 Sergei Tretyakov made a lengthy visit to China where he taught Russian literature and collected materials for some of his later publications. Tretyakov also wrote the controversial "I Want a Baby" ("I Want a Child") (1926) , which has seen recent performances in Europe and America. He was a key contributor to the constructivist journal ''LEF (LEF (Journal))'', (1923-1925) and co-edited the ''Novyi LEF'' (''New LEF'') magazine (1927-1928). Between 1930 and 1931 he travelled in Germany, Denmark, and Austria. Before he fell foul of the authorities he translated and popularised other European writers such as Bertolt Brecht. Brecht was also familiar with Tretyakov's literary work. Tretyakov was arrested by Joseph Stalin's NKVD on July 27, 1937 and charged with espionage. He was eventually executed later that year as part of the Soviet Union's Great Purge. However, in the introduction to the English publication of 'I Want a Baby', Robert Leach says it seems that in a last act of defiance he threw himself to his death down the stairwell at Butyrka prison. During the 1960s, Tretyakov was posthumously rehabilitate (rehabilitate (Soviet))d along with many other victims of Stalin's purge. As a part of Dinamo society Although in the official club documents and club's official badge a foundation year is listed as 1997, in fact, FC Baku was founded 61 year before as a part of Soviet Dinamo Sport Clubs System (Dynamo Sports Club). The "Dinamo" society was officially created on April 18, 1923 on Felix Dzerzhinsky's initiative , in the area patrolled by the 97th Unit of Soviet Border Troops, 471 people had crossed the border illegally from the districts of Hlyboka, Hertsa, Putila, and Storozhynets. The zone assigned to this unit extended from the border to about 7.5 km south of Chernivtsi. * Kakha Bendukidze, former Russian (Russians) businessman, currently working in the administration of President Mikheil Saakashvili. * Lavrenti Beria, head of the NKVD (the predecessor to the KGB), supervisor and one of the initiators of the Soviet Union's Nuclear Project * Giga Bokeria, Georgian (Georgia (country)) political leader With the onset of the Second World War, he was arrested by the NKVD (People's Commissariat of Internal Affairs, (the Soviet secret police) and on 14 June 1941, was in the Sosva prison camp, and was sentenced to death but died before the execution at Sosva, Sverdlovsk oblast, Russia (see Gulag)) Medvedev was born in Bryansk in a steelworker's family. During the Russian Civil War he joined the Red Army and in 1920 he joined the All-Russian Communist Party (Bolsheviks). Between 1920 and 1935 worked in the Cheka, OGPU and the NKVD in Soviet Ukraine (Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic). Great Purge Uborevich was arrested during the Great Purge of the Red Army. In May 1937, Uborevich was tried by the NKVD in an event known as the Case of Trotskyist Anti-Soviet Military Organization. He was executed in June 1937 and posthumously rehabilitated (Rehabilitation (Soviet)) in 1957. ''Superman: Red Son'' In Mark Millar's ''Superman: Red Son'', Martha and her husband are anti-communist protesters in the Soviet Union. They are executed by the NKVD under Commissar Pyotr Roslov (Pete Ross), which leads to their son vowing to overthrow the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Until recently his true date of death was not officially known. Soviet sources such as the ''Soviet Encyclopedia'' stated that he died in 1943 during the German occupation (Reichskommissariat Ukraine). Recently, it has become known that Kucherenko was arrested and after a period of 8 months of prolonged torture was finally shot by the NKVD in 1937. His body was buried in a mass grave on the territory of the KGB recreational facility in the area of Piatykhatky on the outskirts of Kharkiv. Soon after the German forces were pushed out of the city, Filipkowski was invited to a conference with Michał Rola-Żymierski and arrested by the Soviet NKVD in Zhytomir on August 3, 1944; at the same time most of his soldiers were also arrested and sent to Soviet prisons - or had to flee back to German-held part of Poland. Filipkowski was held in a number of Soviet prisons, including the prison in Kiev, a Smersh camp of the 1st Ukrainian Front, and NKVD camps in Kharkov, Ryazan, Dyagilev, Gryazovets and Brest (Brest, Belarus). In November 1947 he was handed over to the Ministry of Public Security of Poland in Biała Podlaska, interrogated and set free. However, soon afterwards his younger son Andrzej (b. 1925), also a former soldier of the Home Army, was arrested by the Communists and was held in prisons until the destalinization thaw of 1956. * In the NKVD (w:NKVD) as it was now in 1936 , Stalin (w:Stalin) had a powerful and experienced instrument. At its head stood Yagoda (‪w:Genrikh Yagoda‬). His deputy in security matters was Stalin’s crony Agranov (‪w:Yakov Agranov‬), who had finished his special operations at Leningrad and handed over that city to the dreadful Sakovsky, who is said to have boasted that if he had Karl Marx to interrogate he would soon make him confess that he was agent of Bismark (Otto von Bismark). ** Robert Conquest (w:Robert Conquest) (1990, 2000), The Great Terror: A Reassessment (40th Anniversary Edition) Oxford University Press p. 81.


Seattle

and cultural resource for GLBT Queer activists and educators, particularly youth of color, young women, (dis)abled youth, working class youth, trans youth and other young people from marginalized communities, working to build a movement of youth united for radical social change." Donovan, Colin Kennedy & Qwo-Li Driskill: ''RESYST Seattle.'' http: www.wearetheones.org resyst.htm RESYST Seattle's final project was the production

. Their mission statement reads, "RESYST Seattle is a political and cultural resource for GLBT Queer activists and educators, particularly youth of color, young women, (dis)abled youth, working class youth, trans youth and other young people from marginalized communities, working to build a movement of youth united for radical social change." Donovan, Colin Kennedy & Qwo-Li Driskill: ''RESYST Seattle.'' http: www.wearetheones.org resyst.htm


Manhattan

business, and then the family home, in the 1929 stock market crash that began the Great Depression, an era in which communism and other radical social philosophies captured the attention of the intelligentsia. Rodney earned a partial track scholarship to Syracuse University, but his family could not afford the other half of his tuition so he did not complete his formal education. To supplement the family income, he took odd jobs, including helping his attorney brother-in-law


India

;mdash; then thick with malaria-bearing mosquitoes and man-eating tigers (Bengal tiger) — were largely avoided by Neolithic humans. More than a millennium of overseas contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Perumpadapu

culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Kochi (Perumpadapu Swaroopam) and Travancore — and spurred by such leaders as Narayana Guru and Chattampi Swamikal — were continued by post-Independence (Indian Independence Movement) governments

contact and trade culminated in four centuries of struggle between and among multiple colonial (colonialism) powers and native Keralite states. Kerala was granted statehood (States Reorganisation Act) on November 1, 1956. Radical social reforms begun in the 19th century by the kingdoms of Kochi (Perumpadapu Swaroopam) and Travancore — and spurred by such leaders as Narayana Guru and Chattampi Swamikal — were continued by post- Indian Independence Movement


Toronto

Pryor , Bill Hicks and Sam Kinison. Because of his radical social and agnostic views, work become limited - and at times his style of humour had him banned from various venues. But because of his long running television program which catered to a niche market, he eventually became an underground success throughout the college circuit. Still highly edgy in his approach, his material has become more philosophical which is a direct influence by philosophers Ken Wilber and Alan Watts


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