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Dessie

as 1954. The city has had electrical power since at least 1963 when a new diesel-powered electric power station with a power line to Kombolcha was completed, at a cost of Eth$ (Ethiopian Birr) 110,000. "Local History in Ethiopia" (pdf) The Nordic Africa Institute website (accessed 2 February 2008) Intercity bus service is provided by the Selam Bus Line Share Company. Dessie shares Combolcha Airport (ICAO code HADC, IATA DSE) with neighbouring Kombolcha. Dessie is home to a museum, in the former home of Dejazmach Yoseph Biru. It also has a zawiya (Zawiya (institution)) of the Qadiriyya order of Islam, which was the first Sufi order to be introduced into north-east Africa. History While camping here in 1882, Emperor (Emperor of Ethiopia) Yohannes IV (Yohannes IV of Ethiopia) was so impressed by his sight of a comet, which he interpreted as a wondrous event, he decided to found a city here, and named it Dessie (Amharic (Amharic language) "My Joy"). Prior to Dessie's foundation, the major settlement in this area was Wasal, first mentioned in an early 16th-century Italian (Italy) itinerary, O.G.S. Crawford, ''Ethiopian Itineraries, circa 1400-1524'' (Cambridge: Hakluyt Society, 1958), pp. 50-52. Dessie's location led to the telegraph line the Italians constructed between 1902 and 1904 from Asmara south to Addis Ababa passing through the city, and giving it a local telegraph office. Also in 1904, the Italian Giuseppe Bonaiuti took part in constructing a fair-weather road connecting the city to Addis Ababa. Dessie increased in importance when Ras (Ras (title)) Mikael Ali (Mikael of Wollo), son-in-law to Emperor Menelik II, made it his base. The city was where his son, would-be emperor Iyasus V (Iyasu V of Ethiopia), crowned Mikael negus around 1915. During his residence in Dessie, the Negus built a palace and the church Enda Medhane Alem, said to be placed on the site of a church destroyed by Imam Ahmed Gragn. The church is decorated with paintings which include portraits of Ras Mikael and his son. After the defeat of his father Negus Mikael, Lij Iyasu took refuge in Dessie beginning on 8 November 1916 while unsuccessfully seeking support from Ras Wolde Giyorgis and other major nobles of northern Ethiopia. However, Ras Wolde Giyorgis used these overtures to extract concessions from the central government, then marched on Dessie which Lij Iyasu fled 10 December. Harold Marcus, ''Haile Sellassie I: The Formative Years 1892-1935'' (Lawrenceville: Red Sea Press, 1996), pp. 25f During the Italian invasion (Second Italo-Abyssinian War), Dessie was first bombed 6 December 1935; the American Hospital was one of the buildings damaged in the attack. Emperor Haile Selassie (Haile Selassie of Ethiopia) was photographed personally machine-gunning the raiding planes. The city was occupied by the Italians 15 April 1936. Dessie became an important administrative center under the Italian occupation (Italian East Africa), and after the Second World War, the town continued in importance as the capital of the province of Wollo until the province's abolition in 1995. The Italian garrison of the city surrendered 26 April 1941 to Brigadier Pienaar's 1st South African Brigade and 500 arbegnoch. In a decree of 1942, Dessie is listed as one of only six "Schedule A" municipalities in Ethiopia, while there were about a hundred in "Schedule B". Artist Essaye Gebre-Medhin Fikre was born in Dessie in 1949. He gained a B.A. in Addis Ababa and an M.A. in Paris but was self-taught as an artist. In 1955, a public address system was installed in the central square which was used to re-broadcast announcements on Radio Addis Ababa to the public. In 1957, Dessie had one of 9 provincial secondary schools (excluding Eritrea) in Ethiopia, named after Woizero Sehine the daughter of Negus Mikael. In February 1973, a crowd of 1,500 peasants marched from Dessie to the capital to make the authorities notice the famine in Wollo. They were stopped by police on the outskirts of Addis Ababa and forced to return. Following the Ethiopian revolution (Ethiopian Civil War), one of the few major encounters between rebels and government forces took place north-west of Dessie in October 1976. Instigated by the local landlord, a large group of peasants marched on the city; troops of the Derg fired into the crowd. Reports of the death toll vary widely, from several hundred to nearly a thousand. In October 1989 Dessie was almost captured by the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF). The EPRDF took permanent control of the city on 18 May 1990, as part of Operation Wallelign. Gebru Tareke, ''The Ethiopian Revolution: War in the Horn of Africa'' (New Haven: Yale University, 2009), p. 306 Demographics Based on the 2007 national census conducted by the Central Statistical Agency (Central Statistical Agency (Ethiopia)) of Ethiopia (CSA), Dessie woreda has a total population of 151,174, of whom 72,932 are men and 78,242 women; 120,095 or 79.44% are urban inhabitants living in the town of Dessie, the rest of the population is living at rural kebeles around Dessie. The majority of the inhabitants were Muslim (Islam in Ethiopia), with 58.62% reporting that as their religion, while 39.92% of the population said they practiced Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity and 1.15% were Protestants (P'ent'ay). Census 2007 Tables: Amhara Region, Tables 2.1, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.4. The 1994 national census reported a total population for Dessie of 97,314 in 17,426 households, of whom 45,337 were men and 51,977 were women. The two largest ethnic groups reported in this town were the Amhara (Amhara people) (92.83%), and the Tigrayan (Tigray-Tigrinya people) (4.49%); all other ethnic groups made up 2.68% of the population. Amharic (Amharic language) was spoken as a first language by 94.89%, and 3.79% spoke Tigrinya (Tigrinya language); the remaining 0.67% spoke all other primary languages reported. 61% of the inhabitants professed Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity, with less than 39% of the population having reported they practiced Islam. ''1994 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Amhara Region'', Vol. 1, part 1, Tables 2.1, 2.7, 2.10, 2.13, 2.17, Annex II.2 (accessed 9 April 2009) Famous inhabitants *Yekuno Amlak from dessie zuria woreda (He was the founder of the Solomonic dynasty), Mohammed Al Amoudi and Mesbah Ali References align center DSE align center HADC style "background:#DCDCDC" Combolcha Airport # align center -


University City, Philadelphia

and far beyond. It was around this time that the "local" neighborhood names like Spruce Hill and Cedar Park CPN: History of Cedar Park. were established. In the mid-1950s, the name University City was coined as a marketing tool by two realtors (former Penn graduates) in an attempt to attract Penn faculty back to the neighborhoods near Penn. The boundaries were defined

;): The top U.S. children's hospital. * Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania ("HUP"): General hospital. * Penn Presbyterian Medical Center ("Presby"): 300-bed hospital, home to the Scheie Eye Institute. * VA Medical Center, Philadelphia ("The VA"): Local center for veterans' healthcare. * National Board of Medical Examiners: Co-sponsor of the USMLE. Scientific Not including the scientific departments of the local universities * Monell Chemical Senses Center: Leader in research on smell and taste. * University City Science Center: Focuses on commercialization. * Wistar Institute: Leader in research on the causes and cures of disease. Cultural * A-Space (A-Space (community center)), an anarchist community center * Philadanco (The Philadelphia Dance Company), a professional dance company * University of Pennsylvania institutions include: ** Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, Penn's modern art museum ** University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, also called "The Penn Museum" Charitable *Neighborhood Bike Works: Donates bicycles and helmets to local kids. Offers training in bicycle repair. *Philadelphia Elwyn (Elwyn (company)): Care for the mentally disabled. * Philadelphia Ronald McDonald House: A "home away from home" for families of seriously ill children receiving treatment at nearby hospitals. Legal * American Law Institute: Provides ''Restatements of the Law''. * Dechert: Large Philadelphia law firm. Government representation * City Council: Hon. Jannie L. Blackwell, 3rd District * PA Senate: Hon. Anthony H. Williams, 8th District * PA House: Hon. James R. Roebuck, Jr., 188th District See also


Goderich, Ontario

, the route is significantly shorter than when it travelled beyond Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) to Niagara Falls (Niagara Falls, Ontario). However, the Queen Elizabeth Way replaced the role of Highway 8, and it was subsequently transferred from provincial to local jurisdiction. Today the highway connects Hamilton and Cambridge, thereafter continuing through Western Ontario to the community of Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) on the shores of Lake Huron. History Highway 8 is one of the oldest provincial highways in Ontario, having first been established in 1918. Up until the early 1970s, the highway was much longer than its current length, extending from Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) through Kitchener-Waterloo (Regional Municipality of Waterloo), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), and Hamilton to Niagara Falls. However, in 1970, the Government of Ontario decided that the stretch of Highway 8 between Winona (Winona, Ontario) (just east of Hamilton) and Niagara Falls was no longer of major transportation significance, since by this time most traffic used the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), just to the north, to go between the two locales. Accordingly, the province downloaded this section of the highway to the newly-formed Regional Municipality of Niagara, which designated the road as Regional Road 81 (Niagara Regional Road 81). In 1998, the provincial government of Mike Harris carried another downloading of the highway to municipal authorities; this time the section between the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario) (near Dundas (Dundas, Ontario)) and Winona was transferred to the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth. Ontario Highway 8 History - The King's Highways of Ontario The first settler in the area was William Hobson, an agent of the Canada Company who was part of a team that went to Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) in 1829. Hobson preferred the area around what is now Haysville and built a log cabin there. In the 1830s, he built a hotel near the Nith River which became a popular stop on the trail between Guelph and the Huron Tract. Haysville continued to be a busy stage coach stopover until the Grand Trunk Railway arrived in 1856 and bypassed the village and went through New Hamburg instead. - Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) Deb Shewfelt (X) (acc.) -


Rossendale

in the 2004 local election (Rossendale Council election, 2004), losing by 40 votes. Colin Rallings, Michael Thrasher, "Local Elections Handbook 2004", p. 129. He was selected to fight a council by-election in Longholme ward in autumn 2004 but his nomination papers were not submitted in time. "Tory sweeps to victory", ''Lancashire

for Rossendale borough council in Greensclough ward in the 2004 local election (Rossendale Council election, 2004), losing by 40 votes. Colin Rallings, Michael Thrasher, "Local Elections Handbook 2004", p. 129. He was selected to fight a council by-election in Longholme ward in autumn 2004 but his nomination papers were not submitted in time. "


North East Lincolnshire

. Recent council results thumb right The A180 near Immingham, an important road for the authority (File:A180(T) - geograph.org.uk - 295856.jpg) class wikitable - ! colspan "9" Local Elections 2012 : North East Lincolnshire - ! style "background:#f66;" Labour !! style "background:#39f;" Conservative !! style "background:#c9f;" UKIP !! style "background:orange;" Liberal Democrats !! Others !! style "background:#3f3;"

"9" Local Elections 2012: Seats - ! style "background:#f66;" Labour !! style "background:#39f;" Conservative!! style "background:orange;" Liberal Democrats !! style "background:#c9f;" UKIP !!Others !! style "background:#3f3;" Green - style "text-align:center;" '''25''' +6 12 −2 4 −5 1 +1 0 Towns and villages


Matagalpa

local fruits(strawberries, oranges, grapefruits, bananas)- In 35 minutes you will get to the city of Jinotega, where you can eat, and buy local "pupusas" (local pastry). On the way back to Managua you will see tenths of Coffee Processing facilities, they dry, dehusk and package the coffee green beans ready for export, from here they take coffee to the ocean ports and then to overseas markets.


Jimma

align center JIM align center HAJM Aba Segud Airport align center -


Bahir Dar

of Emperor Tewodros II (Tewodros II of Ethiopia). Here his army suffered from cholera, forcing the Emperor to move his troops to Begemder. Despite the loss of life on the journey, by the time they reached Begemder, the army was free of the illness. "Local History in Ethiopia" The Nordic Africa Institute website (accessed 12 February 2008) Arthur J. Hayes spent a few days in Bahir Dar in early February 1903, which he described as a village surrounded by a marsh of papyrus plants; nearby were "two or three huts" inhabited by the Weyto (Weyto people), an ethnic group which were considered outcasts by the Amhara (Amhara people), yet "proud of their isolation." Hayes also visited the local church, dedicated to Saint George, which was decorated with murals of the saint in combat and returned victoriously. Hayes, ''The Source of the Blue Nile'' (London, 1905), pp. 142-144, 153. A photo Hayes took of the interior during his stay is published facing p. 154. During the Italian invasion (Second Italo-Abyssinian War), an Italian column moved from Gondar on 23 April 1937 and, after a rapid march, occupied Bahar Dar. The city was bombed by the Royal Air Force on 21–22 October 1940, and although the action made little damage it was a boost to ''Arbegnoch'' morale. After months of skirmishing with the British advance, the Italian garrison under the command of Colonel Torelli was recalled to Gondar by General Guglielmo Nasi, and began to evacuate the city on 27 April 1941. One of Emperor Haile Selassie (Haile Selassie of Ethiopia)'s palaces was located near the city, and the Emperor considered moving the national capital to the town. On 15 June 1961 the Emperor inaugurated the new 226 meter-long highway bridge over the Abay (Abay River), situated at about 3 km from Bahir Dar. A Polytechnic Institute, built by the Soviet Union at a cost of Ethiopian Birr 2.9 million, opened in 1963, with courses in agricultural mechanics, industrial chemistry, electrical technology, wood-working and processing technology, textile technology, and metal technology. Designed to accommodate 1,000 students, at the start in September the school had 21 Ethiopian teachers and 250 students of 8th grade level; by 1968 had 619 students in four grades, with 51 teachers of whom 23 were expatriates. thumb left 200px Resort hotel in Bahir Dar (File:BahirDarResort.jpg) During the Ethiopian Civil War, May 1988 the 603rd corp of the Third Revolutionary Army (TLA) made its headquarters at Bahir Dar. On 3–4 March 1990, the TLA abandoned Bahir Dar in disarray, blowing up the nearby bridge with several hundred soldiers which stopped the TPLF EPRDF forces from occupying the city. However, the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) claimed they had too few effectives in the area to capture the town at that time, and the Derg army reoccupied Bahir Dar a few days later. The EPRDF gained permanent control of the city around 1810 hours on 23 February 1991, as one of the objectives of Operation Tewodros. Gebru Tareke, ''The Ethiopian Revolution: War in the Horn of Africa'' (New Haven: Yale University, 2009), p. 302 The city, in honor of the Millennium celebrations, hosted a National Investment Bazaar and Trade Fair on 6–9 January 2007. Mulat Gezahegn, head of the Trade, Industry and Investment Promotion Coordination Office, told journalists that more than 150 local and foreign companies participated. "Bahirdar City to host trade fair marking Millennium celebrations" WIC (last accessed 30 November 2006) Demographics thumb Map of the regions and zones of Ethiopia. (File:Ethiopia zone region.jpg) Based on the 2007 Census conducted by the Central Statistical Agency (Central Statistical Agency (Ethiopia)) of Ethiopia (CSA), Bahir Dar Special Zone has a total population of 221,991, of whom 108,456 are men and 113,535 women; 180,174 or 81.16% are urban inhabitants, the rest of population are living at rural kebeles around Bahir Dar. At the town of Bahir Dar there are 155,428 inhabitants; the rest of urban population is living at Meshenti, Tis Abay and Zege towns which are part of Bahir Dar Special Zone. As Philip Briggs notes, Bahir Dar "is not only one of the largest towns in Ethiopia, but also one of the fastest growing -- the western outskirts have visibly expanded since the first edition of this guide was published in 1994." Philip Briggs, ''Guide to Ethiopia'', third edition (Old Saybrook: Globe Pequot Press, 2003), p. 181. ISBN 1-84162-035-1 The three largest ethnic groups reported in Bahir Dar Special Zone were the Amhara (Amhara people) (96.23%), the Tigrayan (Tigray-Tigrinya people) (1.11%), and the Oromo (Oromo people) (1.1%); all other ethnic groups made up 1.56% of the population. Amharic (Amharic language) was spoken as a first language by 96.78%, and 1.01% spoke Oromiffa; the remaining 2.21% spoke all other primary languages reported. 89.72% of the population said they practiced Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity, 8.47% were Muslim (Islam in Ethiopia), and 1.62% were Protestants (P'ent'ay). Census 2007 Tables: Amhara Region, Tables 2.1, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.4. The 1994 national census reported a total population for Bahir Dar of 96,140 in 20,857 households, of whom 45,436 were men and 50,704 women. The three largest ethnic groups reported in the city were the Amhara (Amhara people) (93.21%), the Tigrayan (Tigray-Tigrinya people) (3.98%), and the Oromo (Oromo people) (0.7%); all other ethnic groups made up 2.11% of the population. Amharic (Amharic language) was spoken as a first language by 95.52%, and 2.93% spoke Tigrinya (Tigrinya language); the remaining 1.55% spoke all other primary languages reported. 87.53% practiced Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity, and 11.47% of the population said they were Muslim (Islam in Ethiopia). ''1994 Population and Housing Census of Ethiopia: Results for Amhara Region'', Vol. 1, part 1, Tables 2.1, 2.11, 2.14, 2.17 (accessed 6 April 2009) Commons:Category:Bahar Dar


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