Places Known For

modern liberal


Metropolitan Borough of Gateshead

Liberal Party (Liberal Party (modern)) councillor. General Political parties are abandoning their previous policy of hosting conferences at seaside resorts, Gateshead has hosted two major political conferences. The first of these was Labour's spring conference, ahead of the 2005 general election (United Kingdom general election, 2005).


Principality of Montenegro

and the Lawyer's Management Law (1910). Despite all its flaws and restrictions, the Montenegrin Constitution of 1905 was an important introduction of modern liberal tendencies in European societies and of human rights and freedoms in a small patrimonial Balkan country. Demographic history thumb right Ethnic map from 1910 Dark: Serb language majority Light: Albanian majority (File:Montenegro1910.gif) In 1856, he served as an adjutant during the Crimean War; in 1862, as a staff officer in the Montenegrin (Principality of Montenegro) campaign; and in 1870-1871, quelled rebellions in Yemen. He gained the titles of Pasha and Marshal and in 1873 was made commander of the Second Army Corps. During the 1875 uprisings in Bosnia (Bosnia Province, Ottoman Empire) and Herzegovina, he assumed control of the Turkish forces there; and on the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War, 1877-1878, he was sent to take charge of operations in Erzurum (Erzurum Province). Although the Russians (Russian Empire) ultimately defeated the Turks in the war, Moukhtar's victories against them won in the eastern front won him the title ''Ghazi'' ("Victorious").


City of Sunderland

(politician) independent . The only Liberal Party (Liberal Party (modern)) councillor sat with the only Liberal Democrat (Liberal Democrats (UK)) as a "Liberal Democrat" group. Three Councillors resigned from the Labour Party following disputes over the selection of candidates for the 2004 elections. Two became independent members; one joined the Liberal Democrat party, becoming group leader after the 2004 municipal elections.


Weimar Republic

" of Western thought have been devalued as a source of wisdom. Bloom's critique extends beyond the university to speak to the general crisis in American society. ''Closing of the American Mind'' draws analogies between the United States and the Weimar Republic. The modern liberal philosophy, he says, enshrined in the Enlightenment (Age of Enlightenment) thought of John Locke—that a just society could be based upon self-interest alone, coupled by the emergence of relativism

, or an ideology of thought. Relativism was one feature of modern liberal philosophy that had subverted the Platonic–Socratic teaching. ''The Closing of the American Mind'' is a critique of the contemporary university and how Bloom sees it as failing its students. In it, Bloom criticizes the modern movements in philosophy and the humanities. Philosophy professors involved in ordinary language analysis (ordinary language philosophy) or logical positivism disregard important "humanizing" ethical and political issues and fail to pique the interest of students. Bloom, Allan. "The Student and the University", p. 378. ''Closing of the American Mind''. New York: Simon & Schuster. Literature professors involved in deconstructionism promote irrationalism and skepticism of standards of truth and thereby dissolve the moral imperatives which are communicated through genuine philosophy and which elevate and broaden the intellects of those who engage with these imperatives. Bloom, Allan. "The Student and the University", p. 379. ''Closing of the American Mind''. New York: Simon & Schuster. To a great extent, Bloom's criticism revolves around his belief that the "great books" of Western thought have been devalued as a source of wisdom. Bloom's critique extends beyond the university to speak to the general crisis in American society. ''Closing of the American Mind'' draws analogies between the United States and the Weimar Republic. The modern liberal philosophy, he says, enshrined in the Enlightenment (Age of Enlightenment) thought of John Locke—that a just society could be based upon self-interest alone, coupled by the emergence of relativism in American thought—had led to this crisis. For Bloom, this created a void in the souls of Americans, into which demagogic radicals as exemplified by '60s student leaders could leap. (In the same fashion, Bloom suggests, that the Nazi (Nazism) brownshirts once filled the gap created in German society by the Weimar Republic.) In the second instance, he argued, the higher calling of philosophy and reason understood as freedom of thought, had been eclipsed by a pseudo-philosophy, or an ideology of thought. Relativism was one feature of modern liberal philosophy that had subverted the Platonic–Socratic teaching. The Luger was made popular from its use by Germany during World War I and World War II, along with the interwar Weimar Republic and the post war East German Volkspolizei. Although the Luger pistol was first introduced in 7.65×21 mm Parabellum, it is notable for being the pistol for which the 9×19 mm Parabellum (also known as the 9 mm Luger) cartridge was developed. thumb left 100px Royal Monogram (Image:Royal Monogram of Prince Claus of the Netherlands.svg) Prince Claus was born '''Klaus-Georg Wilhelm Otto Friedrich Gerd von Amsberg''', on his family's estate, Haus Dötzingen, near Hitzacker, Germany (Weimar Republic). His parents were Claus Felix von Amsberg and Baroness Gösta von dem Bussche-Haddenhausen. His father, a member of the untitled German nobility, operated a large farm in Tanganyika (formerly German East Africa) from 1928 until World War II. Claus and his six sisters grew up on their grandparents' manor in Lower Saxony; he also attended a boarding school in Tanganyika from 1936 to 1938. In the Weimar Republic, the university was widely recognized as a center of democratic (democracy) thinking, coined by professors like Karl Jaspers, Gustav Radbruch, Martin Dibelius and Alfred Weber. Unfortunately, there were also dark forces working within the university: Nazi (Nazism) physicist Philipp Lenard was head of the physical institute during that time. Following the assassination of Walther Rathenau, he refused to half mast the national flag on the institute, thereby provoking its storming by communist students. Life and work Sirk was born Hans Detlef Sierck in Hamburg, Germany to Danish parents. He was raised in Denmark, but later moved to Germany as a teenager. He spread his education over three universities. He started his career in 1922 in the theatre of the Weimar Republic, including the direction of an early production of ''The Threepenny Opera''. He joined UFA (Universum Film AG) (Universum Film AG) in 1934, but left Germany in 1937 because of his political leanings and Jewish wife. On arrival in the United States, he soon changed his German name. By 1942 he was in Hollywood, directing the stridently anti-Nazi ''Hitler's Madman''. As a reward for his dedication, when the Nazi Party was legalized again and re-organized in 1925 Streicher was appointed ''Gauleiter'' of the Bavarian region of Franconia (which included his home town of Nuremberg). In the early years of the party’s rise, ''Gauleiter'' were essentially party functionaries without real power; but in the final years of the Weimar Republic, they became paramilitary commanders. During the 12 years of the Nazi regime itself, party ''Gauleiter'' like Streicher would wield immense power, and be in large measure untouchable by legal authority. The slanderous attacks continued, and lawsuits followed. Like Fleischmann, other outraged German Jews defeated Streicher in court, but his goal was not necessarily legal victory; he wanted the widest possible dissemination of his message, which press coverage often provided. The rules of the court provided Streicher with an arena to humiliate his opponents, and he characterized the inevitable courtroom loss as a badge of honor. The Weimar (Weimar Republic) habit of following the strictest letter of the law made prosecution for more serious crimes difficult. ''Der Stürmer's (Der Stürmer)'' infamous official slogan, ''Die Juden sind unser Unglück'' (the Jews are our misfortune) was deemed unactionable under German statutes, since it was not a direct incitement to violence. Nordicism thumb 200px ''Meyers Blitz-Lexikon'' ( Weimar Republic Leipzig, 1932 (Image:NordischNordic.JPG)) shows a famous German (Germany) war hero (Karl von Müller) as an example of the Nordic type. Nazi Germany branch 23px border (Image:War Ensign of Germany 1903-1918.svg) Reichsheer (German Army (German Empire)) 23px (Image:Flag of Weimar Republic (war).svg) Reichswehr 23px (File:Flag Schutzstaffel.svg) Waffen-SS First documented in the 13th century, Berlin became the capital of the Kingdom of Prussia (w:Kingdom of Prussia) (1701–1918), the German Empire (w:German Empire) (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (w:Weimar Republic) (1919–33) and the Third Reich (w:Third Reich) (1933–45). Berlin in the 1920s (w:1920s Berlin) was the third largest municipality in the world. After World War II, the city, along with the German state, was divided - into East Berlin (w:East Berlin) — capital of the German Democratic Republic (w:German Democratic Republic), colloquially identified in English as East Germany — and West Berlin (w:West Berlin), a political exclave (w:exclave) (surrounded by the Berlin Wall (w:Berlin Wall) from 1961 to 1989) and a ''de facto'' (although not ''de jure'' (w:Allied Control Council)) state of the Federal Republic of Germany (w:Federal Republic of Germany), known colloquially in English as West Germany (w:West Germany) from 1949 to 1990. Following German reunification (w:German reunification) in 1990, the city was once more designated as the capital of all Germany. thumb right (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 183-S90733, Victor Klemperer.jpg) '''Victor Klemperer (w:Victor Klemperer)''' (9 October 1881 – 11 February 1960) worked as a commercial apprentice, a journalist and eventually a Professor of Literature, specialising in the French Enlightenment at the Technische Universität Dresden (w:Technische Universität Dresden). His diaries detailing his life under successive German states—the German Empire (w:German Empire), the Weimar Republic (w:Weimar Republic), Nazi Germany (w:Nazi Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (w:German Democratic Republic)—were published in 1995. thumb Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles from the film ''Cabaret''. (File:Liza Minnelli Cabaret 1972 crop 3.jpg) '''''Cabaret (w:Cabaret (1972 film))''''' is a 1972 musical film (w:1972 in film) about a female girlie club entertainer in Weimar Republic (w:Weimar Republic) era Berlin who romances two men while the Nazi Party (w:Nazi Party) rises to power around them. :''Directed by Bob Fosse (w:Bob Fosse). Written by Jay Presson Allen (w:Jay Presson Allen), loosely based on the 1966 Broadway musical Cabaret (w:Cabaret (musical)) by Kander and Ebb (w:Kander and Ebb).''


Florence

, and U.S. Supreme Court decisions (Supreme Court of the United States). The introductory course sequence is not a conventional survey of political theory, but introduces students to a theoretical way of thinking about politics and morality, tracking the development of Western political thought over time from its origins in ancient Greek city-state (Polis), its revival in the Florentine republic (Florence), and its coalescence into the modern liberal democracy liberal democratic


Philadelphia

University Yale —Franklin's new school would not focus merely on education for the clergy. He advocated an innovative concept of higher education, one which would teach both the ornamental knowledge of the arts and the practical skills necessary for making a living and doing public service. The proposed program of study became the nation's first modern liberal arts curriculum.


Toronto

Brown , who would later become a Father of Confederation (Fathers of Confederation). Brown's liberal politics led him to court the support of the Clear Grits, precursor to the modern Liberal Party of Canada. ''The Globe'' began in Toronto as a weekly party organ for Brown's Reform Party, but seeing the economic gains that he could make in the newspaper business, Brown soon targeted a wide audience of liberal minded freeholders. He selected as the motto for the editorial page a quotation from Junius, "The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures." The quotation is carried on the editorial page daily to this day. circulation 144,116 weekdays 152,487 Saturdays in 2011 Audit Bureau of Circulations (Audit Bureau of Circulations (North America)) e-Circ data for the six months ending September 30, 2011. Retrieved February 16, 2012. headquarters 300 – 1450 Don Mills Road, Toronto, Ontario oclc The '''''National Post''''' is a Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, a district of Toronto. The paper is owned by Postmedia Network Inc. and is published Mondays through Saturdays. It was founded in 1998 by media magnate Conrad Black. Like its competitor ''The Globe and Mail'', the ''Post'' publishes a separate edition in Toronto, Canada's largest city and the fourth largest media centre in North America after New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago. The Toronto edition includes additional local content not published in the edition distributed to the rest of Canada, and is printed at the ''Toronto Star'' presses in Vaughan (Vaughan, Ontario). birth_date Commons:Category:Toronto WikiPedia:Toronto dmoz:Regional North America Canada Ontario Localities T Toronto


India

The nature and dynamics of factional conflict (p.69)By P. N. Rastogi Parliamentary debates, Volume 98, Issues 1-9(p.111) Published by Parliament of India-Rajya Sabha Indian National Congress: a select bibliography By Manikrao Hodlya Gavit, Attar Chand The party's modern liberal (Social liberalism) platform is largely considered center-left in the Indian political spectrum (Politics of India). Founded in 1885 by members of the occultist movement Theosophical Society —Allan Octavian Hume, Dadabhai Naoroji, Dinshaw Wacha (Dinshaw Edulji Wacha), Womesh Chandra Bonnerjee, Surendranath Banerjee, Monomohun Ghose, Mahadev Govind Ranade http: www.rrtd.nic.in biogovind.html and William Wedderburn—the Indian National Congress became the leader of the Indian Independence Movement, with over 15 million members and over 70 million participants in its struggle against British rule (British Raj) in India. After independence (Indian Independence Act 1947) in 1947, it became the nation's dominant political party, led by the Nehru-Gandhi family for the most part; major challenges for party leadership have only recently formed. Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


United States

of the American Mind'', p.279. New York: Simon & Schuster To a great extent, Bloom's criticism revolves around his belief that the "great books" of Western thought have been devalued as a source of wisdom. Bloom's critique extends beyond the university to speak to the general crisis in American society. ''Closing of the American Mind'' draws analogies between the United States and the Weimar Republic. The modern liberal philosophy, he says, enshrined

crisis in American society. ''Closing of the American Mind'' draws analogies between the United States and the Weimar Republic. The modern liberal philosophy, he says, enshrined in the Enlightenment (Age of Enlightenment) thought of John Locke—that a just society could be based upon self-interest alone, coupled by the emergence of relativism in American thought—had led to this crisis. footnotes '''Savannah''' is the largest city and the county seat

Australia Party - predecessor to the modern Liberal Party of Australia. His wife, Dame Enid Lyons, a Catholic convert, became the first female member of the Australian House of Representatives and later first female member of cabinet in the Menzies Government (Menzies Government (1949-1966)). http: gutenberg.net.au dictbiog 0-dict-biogL.html#lyons1 With the place of Catholics in the British Empire still complicated by Ireland's recent Irish War of Independence


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