Places Known For

military tradition


Principality of Montenegro

with a strong military tradition, belonging to the Piperi clan. His father was, until 1910, an officer of the Kingdom of Serbia army, stationed with the artillery regiment in Topčider, a suburb of Belgrade. Jovanović went to school in Nikšić, and then progressed to the Yugoslav Royal Army's military academy in Belgrade in 1924. There he was a contemporary of Velimir Terzić and Petar Ćetković, who would later also become significant commanders in the partisan forces during World War II. He graduated the top of his class, and was recommended to go to France for 'professional perfection'. He finished with top grades at the academy and went on to its higher school, graduating in 1934. While Osman's forces were in Vidin, his erstwhile commander Suleiman Pasha (Suleiman Pasha (Turkish officer)) was on the Montenegro (Principality of Montenegro) border, and Abdülkerim Pasha (Abdulkerim Nadir Pasha), the other divisional commander, was in Greece (Kingdom of Greece). There were only 186,000 Ottoman troops in the Balkans, of which Osman had less than 20,000. When the Russians crossed the Danube and invaded Bulgaria at Svishtov in July, the Ottoman high command sent Osman to reinforce the city of Nikopol (Nikopol, Bulgaria). Before Osman could reach Nikopol, the Russian vanguard had taken the city in the Battle of Nikopol (16 July) and Osman settled on Plevna to the south. Plevna was a more strategic location being the center of transport and communication lines in northern Bulgaria. Osman started by ordering trenches dug around the city. These trenches are considered an early example of modern bastion defensive works. He literally took his artillery and men under the ground. While Osman was still constructing these fortifications, the Russian forces began to arrive (19 July). However, the Russians were used to warfare in open territory, and sent columns of infantry to directly attack the fortifications. Osman’s defence repelled two Russian attacks with huge casualties on the Russian side. Most analysts agree that a counter-attack at this point would have allowed the Ottoman forces to gain control and destroy the bridge at Svishtov. However, Osman had explicit orders to stay fortified in Plevna, and so did not take advantage of the opportunity. Early life George was born in Cetinje, Principality of Montenegro and was raised in the court of his grandfather King Nicholas before the sudden death of his mother led his father to move his family first to Geneva and thence to Russia. Turkish rule was passed onto Montenegro (Principality of Montenegro) by decision of the Congress of Berlin in 1878. However, this decision was unpopular among the local population and between 1878 and 1912, Plave and Guci existed as a de facto independent state. The distribution of votes was as follows: majority (around 60%-up to around 70%) were against independence in regions bordering Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The highest ''No'' vote was in Serb-majority Plužine municipality with 75.70%. In the authentic Montenegrin regions (former Principality of Montenegro), there was a light majority (around 50-60%) for independence, with the Cetinje municipality (Subdivisions of Montenegro), traditional centre of old Montenegro, having a huge percentage in favour of independence (over 86.38%). At the coastal regions, Herceg Novi municipality, which has a Serb majority had voted 61.34% against independence, the middle southern region (Tivat, Kotor, Budva and Bar (Bar, Montenegro)) being in favour of independence, and the south, Ulcinj municipality, an ethnic Albanian (Albanians) centre, voted strongly in favour of independence (88.50%). The regions bordering Albania and Kosovo that have mostly Bosniak (Bosniak people), Muslim (Muslim by nationality) and Albanian population, were heavily in favour of independence (78.92% in Plav, 91.33% in Rožaje). Municipalities in Montenegro that voted for the Union were Andrijevica, Berane, Kolašin, Mojkovac, Plužine, Pljevlja, Herceg-Novi (Herceg Novi), Šavnik, and Žabljak. The municipalities that voted for independence were Bar (Bar, Montenegro), Bijelo Polje, Budva, Cetinje, Danilovgrad, Kotor, Nikšić, Plav, Podgorica, Rožaje, Tivat, and Ulcinj. The Independentist Bloc won thanks to the high votes of Albanians and to an extent Bosniaks. The highest pro-independence percentages were in Albanian-populated Ulcinj and Bosniak-populated Rožaje. Balkan Update: Albanian and Bosniacs make Montenegro independent In 1856, he served as an adjutant during the Crimean War; in 1862, as a staff officer in the Montenegrin (Principality of Montenegro) campaign; and in 1870-1871, quelled rebellions in Yemen. He gained the titles of Pasha and Marshal and in 1873 was made commander of the Second Army Corps. During the 1875 uprisings in Bosnia (Bosnia Province, Ottoman Empire) and Herzegovina, he assumed control of the Turkish forces there; and on the outbreak of the Russo-Turkish War, 1877-1878, he was sent to take charge of operations in Erzurum (Erzurum Province). Although the Russians (Russian Empire) ultimately defeated the Turks in the war, Moukhtar's victories against them won in the eastern front won him the title ''Ghazi'' ("Victorious").


Legnica

, Weatherford. p. 157. Howorth. pp. 55-62. but before Batu's forces could continue into Vienna and northern Albania, news of Ogedei's death in December 1241 brought a halt to the invasion. Weatherford. p. 158. Matthew Paris. ''English history'' (trans. by J.A.Giles). p. 348. As was customary in Mongol military tradition, all princes of Genghis's line had to attend


Rock Island, Illinois

years Buford was born in Woodford County, Kentucky, but was raised in Rock Island, Illinois, from the age of eight. His father was a prominent Democratic (Democratic Party (United States)) politician in Illinois and a political opponent of Abraham Lincoln. Buford was of English (English American) descent. Boatner. Encyclopedia. Marcus Bainbridge Buford. "The Buford Family in America," 1903. His family had a long military tradition. John Jr.'s


St. Joseph, Missouri

manager in Washington, D.C. for Planned Parenthood Federation (Planned Parenthood). Meriwether Jeff Thompson was born at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, now West Virginia Filbert, Preston, ''The Half not Told; the Civil War in a Frontier Town'', Stackpole Books, page 11 into a family with a strong military tradition on both sides. He moved to Liberty, Missouri in 1847 and St. Joseph (St. Joseph, Missouri) the following year, beginning as a store clerk before


Craiova

military tradition. Deletant, p.37 He was especially close to his mother, Liţa Baranga, who survived his death. Deletant, pp.70, 257 His father, an army officer, wanted Ion to follow in his footsteps, and as such, he sent him to attend the Infantry and Cavalry School in Craiova. According to one account, Ion Antonescu was briefly a classmate of Wilhelm Filderman, the future History of the Jews in Romania Romanian


Orenburg

) and artillerymen. Because of their military tradition, Cossack forces played an important role in Russia’s wars of the 18th and 19th centuries such as the Crimean War and the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78 (Russo-Turkish War (1877–1878) ). In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, relying on the economic prosperity of the Cossacks, their privileged status as a military estate, and their political conservativsm, the tsarist regime employed them extensively to perform police service


Podgorica

the Communist Youth League of Yugoslavia (SKOJ). During World War II he directed the Free Yugoslavia radio. In 1944 he became editor of the Serbian communist daily, ''Borba (Borba (newspaper))''. He also served as deputy Foreign Minister. Biography Arso Jovanović was born in Zavala village near Podgorica, Principality of Montenegro on March 24, 1907 into a family with a strong military tradition, belonging to the Piperi clan. His father was, until 1910, an officer of the Kingdom of Serbia army, stationed with the artillery regiment in Topčider, a suburb of Belgrade. Jovanović went to school in Nikšić, and then progressed to the Yugoslav Royal Army's military academy in Belgrade in 1924. There he was a contemporary of Velimir Terzić and Petar Ćetković, who would later also become significant commanders in the partisan forces during World War II. He graduated the top of his class, and was recommended to go to France for 'professional perfection'. He finished with top grades at the academy and went on to its higher school, graduating in 1934. Today It is famous for its 2 km long sandy beach. Low prices (if compared with its neighbour Budva), along with easy access via Belgrade - Bar railway, makes it a very popular budget destination and extremely crowded during summer months. It is a favorite spot for day trips for young people from Podgorica, as it is only half an hour away, either by train or by car. - 8. March 28, 2009 Podgorica, Montenegro (Podgorica) WikiPedia:Podgorica Commons:Category:Podgorica Dmoz:Regional Europe Montenegro Localities Podgorica


Kansas City, Kansas

Dakota Rapid City , and Sioux Falls (Sioux Falls, South Dakota), South Dakota. Scheels is also located in Appleton (Appleton, Wisconsin) and Eau Claire (Eau Claire, Wisconsin), Wisconsin. On June 25, 2011, a new Scheels location opened in Springfield, Illinois. Another all sports store is planned for Kansas City, Kansas' Village West, and a store in Sandy, Utah is scheduled to open in October 2012. Due to military tradition, the cemetery was originally divided


Independence, Missouri

to military tradition, the cemetery was originally divided into burial areas for enlisted personnel and a separate area for officers, but in 1858 the remains were re-interred into a single site. In the years following the Civil War (American Civil War), the bodies of Union soldiers from Kansas City, Kansas and Independence, Missouri, were re-interred at Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery. In addition, the cemetery was used as the burial ground for soldiers who served at frontier posts


Kingdom of Serbia

later he joined Communist Party of Yugoslavia. Soon he was named Secretary-General of the League of Communists of Youth of Yugoslavia (SKOJ) in Belgrade. Biography Arso Jovanović was born in Zavala village near Podgorica, Principality of Montenegro on March 24, 1907 into a family with a strong military tradition, belonging to the Piperi clan. His father was, until 1910, an officer of the Kingdom of Serbia army, stationed with the artillery regiment in Topčider, a suburb of Belgrade. Jovanović went to school in Nikšić, and then progressed to the Yugoslav Royal Army's military academy in Belgrade in 1924. There he was a contemporary of Velimir Terzić and Petar Ćetković, who would later also become significant commanders in the partisan forces during World War II. He graduated the top of his class, and was recommended to go to France for 'professional perfection'. He finished with top grades at the academy and went on to its higher school, graduating in 1934. left thumb 220px WWII memorial monument dedicated to the fallen partisan fighters and to the victims of fascist terror (File:Spomenik borcima NOB u Futogu.JPG) In 1918, Futog, as part of the Banat, Bačka and Baranja region, became part of the Kingdom of Serbia (as was decided by the decree of the Great people's assembly in Novi Sad in 1918, November 25). Since December 1, 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later known as Yugoslavia). From 1918 to 1922, Futog was part of the Novi Sad County, from 1922 to 1929 part of the Bačka Oblast, and from 1929 to 1941 part of the Danube Banovina. In 1918, as part of Banat, Bačka and Baranja region, Šajkaška became part of the Kingdom of Serbia and then part of the newly formed Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later renamed to Yugoslavia). From 1918 to 1922 Šajkaška was part of the Novi Sad County, from 1922 to 1929 part of the Belgrade Oblast, and from 1929 to 1941 part of the Danube Banovina. From 1941 to 1944, region was occupied by the Axis Powers and was attached to Bács-Bodrog County (Bács-Bodrog) of the Horthy's (Miklos Horthy) Hungary (Hungary during World War II). In 1942 raid, Hungarian occupational authorities killed numerous ethnic Serbs, Jews and Roma (Roma people) in Šajkaška. In 1944, Soviet (Soviet Union) Red Army and Yugoslav partisans expelled Axis forces from the region and Šajkaška became part of the autonomous province of Vojvodina (Autonomous Province of Vojvodina (1945–1963)) within new socialist Yugoslavia (SFRY). Since 1945, AP Vojvodina is part of the People's Republic of Serbia within Yugoslavia. Today, Šajkaška is mainly agricultural region, with well-developed food industry. In 1918, the town first became part of the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs, then part of the Kingdom of Serbia and finally part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. From 1918 to 1922, Šid was part of the Syrmia county, from 1922 to 1929 part of the Syrmia oblast, from 1929 to 1931 part of the Drina Banovina, from 1931 to 1939 part of the Danube Banovina, and from 1939 to 1941 part of the Banovina of Croatia. During World War II, from 1941 to 1944, the town was occupied by Axis (Axis Powers) troops and was included into the Pavelić's (Ante Pavelić) Independent State of Croatia. In 1944, Šid was liberated by Yugoslav partisans and until April 1945, important acts of the Syrmian Front were fought near the town. The Yugoslav Partisans mined the local Catholic church during the offensive in late 1944. Obnova crkve Presvetog Srca Isusova u Šidu, Slobodna Dalmacija Since 1944, the town is part of Vojvodina, which (from 1945) was an autonomous province of Serbia and Yugoslavia. During the last twenty years of his life, his relationship with the conservative Catholic clergy worsened, as did the quality of his literary work. He continued to enjoy full support from the liberal (Liberalism in Slovenia) political establishment in Carniola, led by Ivan Tavčar and Ivan Hribar. His friendship with the Swedish (Swedish people) slavist and historian Alfred Anton Jensen opened him the doors to international recognition: his poems were published in Sweden, Russia (Russian Empire), Galicia (Galicia (Central Europe)), Croatia, Serbia (Kingdom of Serbia), and in the Czech Lands. However, he started losing his influence over younger Slovenian authors. He rejected the poetry of Dragotin Kette and Josip Murn and entered in a dispute with the poet Oton Župančič, from which he came as a clear loser. The young writer Ivan Cankar, whom Aškerc admired, also published several critically sarcastic essays on Aškerc's late poetry, in which he targeted Aškerc as being the symptom of the decay of old the Slovenian provincial national-liberal élite. The concept of a Greater Croatia was developed further The Romanian government signed a treaty with the Allies on August 17, 1916 and declared war on the Central Powers on August 27. The Romanian Army was quite large, with over 650,000 men in 23 divisions (Division (military)). However, it suffered from poor training and equipment, especially compared to its German counterparts. Meanwhile, the German Chief of Staff (Chief of staff (military)), General Erich von Falkenhayn correctly reasoned that Romania would side with the Allies and made plans to deal with Romania. Thanks to the earlier conquest of the Kingdom of Serbia and the ineffective Allied operations on the Kingdom of Greece border, and having a territorial interest in Dobrogea, the Bulgarian Army and the Ottoman Army were willing to help fight the Romanians.


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