Places Known For

low population


Bács-Bodrog County

was restored after 1944 and the county was abolished again. Yugoslav part of former Bács-Bodrog county was later divided into 3 districts and currently is part of Serbia, autonomous region of Vojvodina. Demographics thumb 250px Ethnic map and political division of the area in 1715 (Image:Backa ethnic map 1715.png) During the 18th century, the Habsburgs carried out an intensive colonisation of the area, which had low population density after the last Ottoman


Jastrebarsko

the population of the seat settlement has been continuously increasing since at least 1981. Jastrebarsko metropolitan area includes the City of Jastrebarsko and three adjacent municipalities: Klinča Sela, Krašić and Žumberak (Žumberak (municipality)). The area is fairly large at Early military career Obrenović's first assignment was a tank platoon command at the Jastrebarsko garrison in the SFR Yugoslav (Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia) republic of Croatia. After six months he was promoted to tank company commander in the same brigade. This post he held until 1990 when he was promoted to deputy command of the armored battalion. In October 1991, during the Croatian War of Independence, the JNA started its withdrawal from Croatia and Obrenović's unit was relocated to the Dubrava Airport in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, where he was promoted to acting commander of the armored battalion. On February 28, 1992, his battalion was relocated to Mali Zvornik and Zvornik when the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina began to deteriorate as well.


La Tuque, Quebec

was formed out of portions from the unincorporated Carignan and Malhiot Townships, in the proximity of the Saint-Maurice Wildlife Reserve. However, its low population and constantly rising administrative costs led to the merger of Haute-Mauricie with La Tuque in August 1993. On March 26, 2003, Le Haut-Saint-Maurice Regional County Municipality was dissolved and all its municipalities and unorganized territories were amalgamated into the new City of La Tuque


Tunja

Buenaventura and Tumaco. Some departments have local administrative subdivisions, where towns have a large concentration of population and municipalities are near each other (for example in Antioquia and Cundinamarca). Where departments have a low population and there are security problems (for example Amazonas, Vaupés and Vichada), special administrative divisions are employed, such as "department ''corregimientos''", which are a hybrid of a municipality and a ''corregimiento''. By March 1811 the province of Bogotá had transformed itself into a state called Cundinamarca (Free and Independent State of Cundinamarca). Cundinamarca convened a "Congress of the United Provinces," which first met in Bogotá, but later moved to Tunja and Leyva (Villa de Leyva) to maintain independence from the capital city. It established a confederation called the United Provinces of New Granada on November 27, 1811, but Cundinamarca did not recognize the new federation. The dispute over the form of government erupted into civil war by the end of 1812, and once again in 1814. By mid-1815 a large Spanish expeditionary force (Spanish reconquest of New Granada) under Pablo Morillo had arrived in New Granada. Cartagena fell in December, and by May 1816 the royalists had control of all of New Granada. In 1813 he was given a military command in Tunja, New Granada (New Kingdom of Granada) (modern day Colombia), under the direction of the Congress of United Provinces of New Granada (United Provinces of New Granada), which had formed out of the junta (military junta)s established in 1810. In Colombia Claver arrived in Cartagena, Colombia in 1610, still a novice. Required to wait five years to be ordained as a priest, he lived in Jesuit monasteries at Tunja and Bogotá. During those preparatory years, he was deeply disturbed by the harsh treatment and living conditions of the black slaves who were brought from Africa. By this time, the slave trade had been established in the Americas for about a century; Cartagena was a slave-trading hub. 10,000 slaves poured into the port yearly, crossing the Atlantic from West Africa under conditions so foul that an estimated one-third died in transit. Although the slave trade was condemned by Pope Paul III (and later called "supreme villainy" by Pope Pius IX, it was a lucrative business for all involved and continued to flourish. Republic of Tunja (1812) (During the Reign of Fernando VII) The Province of Tunja had originally refuted the actions of Bogotá in declaring independence from Spain, but as cities within its own province started to clamour for independence by joining Cundinamarca who had already attained theirs, Tunja was forced to act quickly. On November 26, 1811 Tunja signed the Act of Confederation joining the United Provinces of New Granada, and on December 9, 1811 declared its formal independence from Spain. The tensions between Cundinamarca and the United Provinces however forced Tunja to enter into a treaty with Cundinamarca; the ''Santa Rosa Pact'' separated Tunja from the Federalist government of the United Provinces and put it in track to eventually join the Centralist government of Cundinamarca. The Republic of Tunja was now standing in its own two feet under the administration of President-Governor Juan Nepomuceno Niño, this lasted until Cundinamarca was finally defeated and Tunja rejoined the United Provinces. - style "text-align:center; background:#e6e9ff;" ! colspan 6 30px (File:Escudo de Tunja.svg) • Republic of Tunja (Tunja) • 30px (File:Escudo de Tunja.svg) - style "text-align:center; background:#e6e9ff;" In 1539, Gonzalo Suárez Rendón, a Spanish colonist, founded the village of Tunja and other sites where the indigenous people previously had their villages. The village of Tunja became one of the main political and economic centers for the Spanish during the Viceroyalty of New Granada. - 35 Tunja 152.419 Boyacá (Boyacá Department) - - Colombia Tunja Cathedral Basilica of St James (Tunja Cathedral) 1980 100px (Image:Catedral tunja.JPG) - Tunja The highway stretch from Barbosa to Tunja is 53 km. Tunja is the capital of Boyacá department and is a major agriculture and mining center in Colombia. At Tunja, the Pan-American Highway switches highway route numberings once again, this time returning to Colombia Route 55. The stretch of highway from Tunja to the departamental border with Cundinamarca (Cundinamarca Department) is 54 km, and is a toll road, so be prepared to pay the tolls. Once the Amerindian tribes were dominated, the Spanish organized the territory based on Cabildo (Cabildo (council))s (councils) to maintain the dominance and administer justice in the conquered territory. Amerindians were enslaved and forced to work in agriculture, manufacturing goods, and mines. These two villages functioned as centers for the Cabildos' territories. In 1636 the Cabildo of Vélez was transferred to a new jurisdiction centered on the village of Girón (Girón, Santander), with an area which went from the Sogamoso River, Río del Oro (Río del Oro River) to the Magdalena River. The village of San Gil was created in 1689, segregated from the Jurisdiction of Vélez. In 1789 the village of Socorro (Socorro, Santander) was also segregated from Vélez and they were all put under the mandate of the Province of Tunja (Tunja), a subdivision of the Viceroyalty of New Granada. On July 9, 1795 the ''corregimiento'' of Vélez - San Gil - Socorro was created due to the unsustainability of the Province of Tunja, and local government was established in the village of Socorro. The northern confederation was ruled by the Zaque, and had its capital at Hunza, known today as Tunja. Although both confederations had common political relations and affinities and belonged to the same tribal nation, there were still rivalries between them. Among the confederations, there were four chiefdoms: Bacatá, Hunza (Tunja), Duitama, and Sogamoso. The chiefdom was composed by localities. Londoño, E., ''El lugar de la religión en la organización social muisca'' (tr.en The place of religion in the Muisca social organization), Museo del Oro. En Biblioteca Luís Ángel Arango. The tribes were divided into ''Capitanías'' (ruled by a Capitan. There were two kinds: ''Great Capitania'' (''sybyn'') and ''Minor Capitania'' (''uta''). The status of ''Capitan'' was inherited by maternal lineage. Londoño E., op.cit. The northern confederation was ruled by the Zaque, and had its capital at Hunza, known today as Tunja. Although both confederations had common political relations and affinities and belonged to the same tribal nation, there were still rivalries between them. Among the confederations, there were four chiefdoms: Bacatá, Hunza (Tunja), Duitama, and Sogamoso. The chiefdom was composed by localities. Londoño, E., ''El lugar de la religión en la organización social muisca'' (tr.en The place of religion in the Muisca social organization), Museo del Oro. En Biblioteca Luís Ángel Arango. The tribes were divided into ''Capitanías'' (ruled by a Capitan. There were two kinds: ''Great Capitania'' (''sybyn'') and ''Minor Capitania'' (''uta''). The status of ''Capitan'' was inherited by maternal lineage. Londoño E., op.cit. The battle occurred 150 km from Bogotá in the Andes Mountains, in a place known as ''Casa de Teja'', close to a bridge over the Teatinos River and 3 roads heading to Samaca, Motavita and Tunja, an area which is now part of the Boyacá Department. Before the discovery of America (Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact), Tundama (Duitama) was governed by the cacique Tundama. Nemequene (the Zaque) was the leader of the "north" and his establishment was Hunza (Tunja) (Tunja). Though the Zaque was considered the king of the north (where Duitama is located), he did not have absolute control over the population. He was, however, considered a person of great power and a holy man. Before the discovery of America (Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact), Tundama (Duitama) was governed by the cacique Tundama. Nemequene (the Zaque) was the leader of the "north" and his establishment was Hunza (Tunja) (Tunja). Though the Zaque was considered the king of the north (where Duitama is located), he did not have absolute control over the population. He was, however, considered a person of great power and a holy man. align "center" 1953 Tunja, Chiquinquirá, Duitama, and Sogamoso align "center" '''Villa de Leyva''' is a colonial town and municipality, in the Boyacá (Boyacá Department) department of Colombia, part of the subregion of the Ricaurte Province. The town is located some 40 km west of Tunja and has a population of about 9,600 people. Villa de Leyva is considered one of the finest colonial villages of Colombia, and was declared a National Monument on December 17, 1954 to preserve its architecture. It is located in a high altitude valley at 2,144 m altitude where fossils from the Mesozoic and the Cretaceous abound. Description Lake Iguaque is located northwest to Villa de Leyva, and is part of the Iguaque wildlife sanctuary. The predominant ecosystem is the páramo, with presence of frailejón plant, ferns, lichens and puya (Puya (genus))s. The average temperature is 12°C. The route of access to the natural reservation is: Bogotá – Tunja (147 km) Tunja – Villa de Leyva (39 km). The visitors center Furachiogua offers accommodation up to 48 persons, and camping zone. (spanish) http: ecomochilas.com index.php?option com_content&view article&id 23&Itemid 43 birth_date commons:Tunja


Provincias Internas

'''Spanish Texas''' was one of the interior provinces (Provincias Internas) of New Spain from 1690 until 1821. Although Spain claimed ownership of the territory, which comprised part of modern-day Texas, including the land north of the Medina (Medina River) and Nueces Rivers, the Spanish did not attempt to colonize the area until after discovering evidence of the failed French colony of Fort Saint Louis (Fort Saint Louis (Texas)) in 1689. In 1690, Alonso De León escorted several Catholic (Roman Catholic Church) missionaries (missionary) to East Texas, where they established the first mission in Texas. When native tribes resisted the Spanish presence, the missionaries returned to Mexico, abandoning Texas for the next two decades. Spanish Colonial era - 1781–1821 The office of ''Alcalde''-Mayor of the El Pueblo de la Reina de los Ángeles (Pueblo de Los Angeles) in the Las Californias 1786–1804 and Alta California 1804–1822 territories of the Commandancy General of the Provincias Internas (Provincias Internas) in the Castilian (Spanish) (Crown of Castile) Viceroyalty of New Spain. :''The Alcalde was elected annually, without the right to reelection for two years. With the incomplete nature of records from the Spanish colonial period of Los Angeles (History of Los Angeles#Spanish Era 1769–1821), only the first year of 1781 is certain.'' Caughey, John and LaRee Caughey. ''Los Angeles: Biography of a City''. Berkeley, University of California Press, 1977. 74. ISBN 0-520-03410-4 "Alcalde" and "Ayuntamiento" in Pitt, Leonard and Dale PItt. ''Los Angeles A to Z: An Encyclopedia of the City and County''. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997. 11 and 33. ISBN 0-520-20274-0 Besides the settlements under the Toledo reforms, the Franciscans and the Jesuits (Society of Jesus) also organized reductions, mainly in the Viceroyalty of Peru. It were these that eventually achieved the most development, success, and fame, especially the Jesuit Reductions of Paraguay. This was a result in a difference between the application of the reduction system between Viceroyalty of New Spain and the Viceroyalty of Peru. The work of Vasco de Quiroga—the Bishop of Michoacán who founded a number of hospital towns—and Francisco de Toledo, Count of Oropesa—the Viceroy of Peru (List of Viceroys of Peru) who promoted the system and convinced the Jesuits to work within it—should be especially noted for their efforts to improve the system. Father Eusebio Kino (Eusebio Kino) worked for humane practices at the Spanish missions in the Sonoran Desert and in the forced labor conditions at the silver mines and ranchos in ''Provincia Interna (Provincias Internas)'' ''de'' ''Sonora y Sinaloa''. The pueblo came under the jurisdiction of the Commandancy General of the Internal Provinces (Provincias Internas) in the Viceroyalty of New Spain. As a pueblo, Los Angeles was granted a ''cabildo (cabildo (council))'' (town council). The first municipal officers were appointed by Governor de Neve, and subsequent ones elected by the settlers, the ''vecinos pobladores (Vecino)'' (the settling resident townspeople). Since the government of Las Californias had a strong military orientation in this early phase of colonization, the civilian ''cabildo'' was originally supervised by a ''comisionado'' (commissioner) appointed by the ''comandante (Commandant (rank))'' (commander) of the Presidio of Santa Barbara, who was charged with making sure the ''alcalde'' (municipal magistrate) and ''regidores'' (council members) carried out their duties correctly. The first recorded ''alcalde'' was José Vanegas, who served for the years 1786 and 1796. Vanegas was first listed as an "Indian" (Indigenous peoples of the Americas) in the original 1781 ''padrón'' (register) but then as a Mestizo in the 1790 census. Unfortunately the records of the Spanish-era ''cabildo'' were lost and the relevant parts of the Provincial archives burned in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, so the surviving list of ''alcaldes'' is incomplete. Caughey, John and LaRee Caughey. ''Los Angeles: Biography of a City''. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1977), 74-75. ISBN 0-520-03410-4. The next few ''alcaldes'' reflected the mixed population of the small settlement: José Sinova, a Criollo (Criollo (people)), 1789; Mariano de la Luz Verdugo (Jose Maria Verdugo#Mariano Verdugo), a Criollo, 1790; and Juan Francisco Reyes, a Mulatto, 1793. Among the first ''regidores'' were Felipe Santiago García (a Criollo) and Manuel Camero (a Mulatto in the 1781 ''padrón'', and a Mestizo in 1790 census). In judicial affairs, both military and civil cases were appealed to the Audiencia of Guadalajara (Real Audiencia of Guadalajara). Bancroft, Hubert Howe (Hubert Howe Bancroft). ''The Works of Hubert Howe Bancroft. Vol. XVIII (The History of California, vol. 1, 1542-1800)'' (San Francisco: The History Company Publishers, 1886), 337 and 461-462.


King, Ontario

* Construction and Manufacturing: 24% * Business services: 23% * Wholesale and Retail Trade: 17% * Health and Education: 12% * Finance and Real Estate: 8% The median income for two-parent families is $90,364. For single-parent families, the median income is $43,673. The average value of a dwelling in King in 2006 was $386,416. Religion The township's residents have the following religious affiliation: *39.8% Protestant *38.3% Roman Catholic *17.1% atheist, agnostic or other non-theism *2.9% other Christian *0.1% Jewish *1.8% other religion Language According to the 2011 Census, the most prevalent mother tongues for King residents are as follows: * English (English language): 75.6% * Italian (Italian language): 10.1% * German (German language): 1.9% * Polish (Polish language): 1.0% Transportation The Township of King is located between Toronto and Barrie (Barrie, Ontario), stretching from Bathurst Street to just east of Highway 50 (Highway 50 (Ontario)). King is accessible by Highways 400 (Ontario Highway 400), 27 (Highway 27 (Ontario)), 9 (Highway 9 (Ontario)) and 11. Public transportation is provided by York Region Transit (bus service) and GO Transit (bus and train services), but their services are limited in the township due to low population density. King City GO Station is the only train station in the township. York Region Transit's services are confined to the southeastern area, and GO bus serves the Nobleton and King City communities


Sacramento metropolitan area

Mediterranean Climate in the valley to alpine climate zones in the high mountains. Apart from the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento metropolitan areas (and some other cities in the Central Valley), it is a region of relatively low population density. Northern California's economy is noted for being the de-facto world leader industries such as high technology (both software and semiconductor), as well as being known for clean power (Environmental engineering), biomedical


North Lincolnshire

-East Lincolnshire ) is the second largest of the English counties and one that is predominantly agricultural in character. Despite its relatively large physical area, it has a comparatively small population (of less than 1 million people). The unusually low population density that arises gives the county a very different character from the much more densely populated and urbanised counties of south-east and northern England, and is, in many ways, key to understanding the nature of the county


Novgorod Oblast

;1989Census" commons:category:Novgorod Oblast wikipedia:Novgorod Oblast


Popayán


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