Places Known For

low annual


Córdoba, Veracruz

, coffee, avocado, orange (Orange (fruit)), lemon, and rice, along with some non-traditional crops as anturios, heliconias and palma camedor. A highway connects Córdoba with the state's principal port, Veracruz (Veracruz (city)). There is an adequate workforce, with a relatively low annual wage, providing opportunities for hiring for industry. Córdoba is the focal point for the local sugar milling (sugar refinery) and coffee processing industries, and it is also


Portuguese Timor

. In reality, the relation of mainland Portuguese to their overseas possessions was that of colonial administrator to a subservient colony. Political, legislative, administrative, commercial and other institutional relations between the colonies and Portugal-based individuals and organizations were numerous, though migration to, from, and between Portugal and its overseas departments was limited in size, due principally to the long distance and low annual income of the average Portuguese as well that of the indigenous overseas populations. United Nations Ruled by Portugal (Portuguese Timor) 1515–1975, occupied by Indonesia (Indonesian occupation of East Timor) 1975–1999, administered by U.N. (United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor) 1999–2002. - A freelance journalist (freelancer) then working for the Australian Associated Press (AAP), East came to Portuguese Timor in October 1975 following up the story of the Balibo Five, who had been killed by the Indonesians in an incursion just weeks before. Previously, he had worked as a publicity officer for the Country Party (National Party of Australia) in Queensland, and had been working in Darwin (Darwin, Northern Territory) as a press officer for the Darwin Reconstruction Commission, set up following the devastation of the city by Cyclone Tracy in December 1974. Liquiçá District is situated on the northern coast of East Timor, and borders the districts of Dili (Dili (district)) (containing the national capital) to the east, Aileu (Aileu (district)) to the Southeast, Ermera to the south, and Bobonaro (Bobonaro District) to the southwest. To the northwest lies the Savu Sea. The district has a population of 55,058 (Census 2004) and an area of 543 square kilometers. The district is identical to the district of the same name in Portuguese Timor. Its subdistricts are Bazartete, Liquiçá and Maubara. thumb The Suharto-Whitlam House in Dieng Plateau (File:Suharto-Whitlam House.JPG), Indonesia where Whitlam discussed the future of East Timor with Indonesian President, Suharto, in 1974 Following the 1974 Carnation Revolution, Portugal began a process of decolonisation and began a withdrawal from Portuguese Timor (later East Timor). Australians had long taken an interest in the colony; the nation had sent troops to the region during World War II, and many East Timorese had fought the Japanese as guerrillas. Formosa (Taiwan under Portuguese rule) list5 '''Present colonies (only Atlantic Ocean)'''


Portuguese Guinea

institutional relations between the colonies and Portugal-based individuals and organizations were numerous, though migration to, from, and between Portugal and its overseas departments was limited in size, due principally to the long distance and low annual income of the average Portuguese as well that of the indigenous overseas populations. By early 1974, guerrilla operations in Angola and Mozambique had been reduced to sporadic ambush operations against the Portuguese in the rural countryside areas, far from the main centers of population. The only exception was Portuguese Guinea, where PAIGC guerrilla operations, strongly supported by neighbouring allies like Guinea and Senegal, were largely successful in liberating and securing large areas of Portuguese Guinea. According some historians, Portugal recognized its inability to win the conflict in Guinea at the outset, but was forced to fight on to prevent an independent Guinea from serving as a inspirational model for insurgents in Angola and Mozambique. NORRIE MACQUEEN, Portugal's First Domino: ‘Pluricontinentalism’ and Colonial War in Guiné-Bissau, 1963–1974, "Portugal's presence in Guiné-Bissau through eleven years of intense guerrilla war was justified by the doctrine of ‘pluricontinentalim’. In this view concession to nationalist pressure in one part of the ‘indivisible state’ would lead inevitably to the collapse of the whole. The defence of Portuguese Guiné, therefore, was the price to be paid for the maintenance of the infinitely more valuable territories of Angola and Mozambique. While the Salazar regime was rigid in its adherence to this doctrine, some movement was detectable under his successor from 1968, Marcelo Caetano. The governor-general in Guiné, General Spínola, was permitted to explore possibilities of negotiation. Politically insecure in the face of residual Salazarist power in the regime, however, Caetano abandoned this approach in 1972. This apparent loss of nerve would contribute to the overthrow of the Caetano government by its own military in 1974.", Contemporary European History (1999), 8: 209-230 Cambridge University Press thumb right A PAIGC checkpoint in 1974 (Image:PAIGC posto de controlo.jpg) In Portuguese Guinea (also simply referred to as Guinea at that time), the Marxist African Party for the Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC) started fighting in January 1963. Its guerrilla fighters attacked the Portuguese headquarters in Tite, located to the south of Bissau, the capital, near the Corubal river. Similar actions quickly spread across the entire colony, requiring a strong response from the Portuguese forces. The war in Guinea has been termed "Portugal's Vietnam". The PAIGC was well-trained, well-led, and equipped and received substantial support from safe havens in neighbouring countries like Senegal and Guinea-Conakry. The jungles of Guinea and the proximity of the PAIGC's allies near the border proved to be of significant advantage in providing tactical superiority during cross-border attacks and resupply missions for the guerrillas. The conflict in Portuguese Guinea involving the PAIGC guerrillas and the Portuguese Army would prove the most intense and damaging of all conflicts in the Portuguese Colonial War, blocking Portuguese attempts to pacify the disputed territory via new economic and socioeconomic policies that had been applied with some success in Portuguese Angola and Portuguese Mozambique. In 1965 the war spread to the eastern part of Guinea; that same year, the PAIGC carried out attacks in the north of the territory where at the time only the Front for the Liberation and Independence of Guinea (FLING), a minor insurgent group, was active. By this time, the PAIGC had begun to openly receive military support from the Socialist Bloc, mainly from Cuba, and the Soviet Union. Prior to their own Colonial War the Portuguese military had studied French and British efforts in Indo-China, Algeria and Malaya (Cann, 1997). Based on their analysis of operations in those theatres and considering their own situation in Africa, the Portuguese military took the unusual decision to restructure their entire armed forces, from top to bottom, for counterinsurgency. This transformation did, however, take seven years to complete and only saw its final form in 1968. By 1974 the counterinsurgency efforts were successful in the Portuguese territories of Angola (Angola (Portugal)) and Mozambique (Mozambique (Portugal)), but in Portuguese Guinea the local guerrilla was making progresses. As the conflict escalated, the Portuguese authorities developed progressively tougher responses, these included the Gordian Knot Operation and the Operation Green Sea. right 250px thumb The Portuguese Airforce employed Fiat G91 (Image:Fiat G91.jpg) aircraft like this in the Portuguese Colonial War. Unlike the Vietnam War, Portugal's limited national resources did not allow for widespread use of the helicopter. Only those troops involved in raids (Raid (military)) (also called ''golpe de mão'' (hand blow) in Portuguese) - mainly Commandos (Portuguese Army Commandos) and Paratroopers - would deploy by helicopter. Most deployments were either on foot or in vehicles (Berliet and Unimog trucks). The helicopters were reserved for support (in a gunship role) or MEDEVAC. The Alouette III (Aérospatiale Alouette III) was the most widely-used helicopter, although the Puma (Aérospatiale Puma) was also used with great success. Other aircraft were employed: for air support the T6 (T-6 Texan), the F-86 Sabre and the Fiat G.91 were used; for reconnaissance the Dornier Do 27 was employed. In the transport role, the Portuguese Air Force originally used the Junkers Ju 52, followed by the Nord Noratlas, the C-54 Skymaster, and the C-47 (C-47 Skytrain) (all of these aircraft were also used for Paratroop drop operations). From 1965, Portugal (Estado Novo (Portugal)) began to purchase the Fiat G.91 to deploy to its African overseas territories of Mozambique (Portuguese East Africa), Guinea (Portuguese Guinea) and Angola (Portuguese West Africa) in the close-support role. Nicolli 2003, p.174 The first 40 G.91 were purchased second-hand from the Luftwaffe, out of the aircraft that had originally been produced for Greece and which differed from the rest of the Luftwaffe G.91s sufficiently to create maintenance problems. The aircraft replaced the Portuguese F-86 Sabre. Colonial War The army participated in colonial war (Portuguese Colonial War) from 1961 to 1974, in Angola, Goa, Mozambique, Portuguese Guinea and Cape Verde. At the other oversees possessions, East Timor and São Tomé and Príncipe, there was a military presence but no guerrilla organizations. In 1961, the isolated and relatively small Portuguese Army suffered a defeat (Invasion of Goa) against a largely superior Indian Army in the colony of Portuguese India, which was subsequently lost to the Union of India in the same invasion. The counterinsurgency campaigns in Africa had various degrees of success ranging from almost victory in Angola to total and conventional war in Portuguese Guinea. This war ended after the Carnation Revolution military coup of April 1974 in Lisbon and subsequently independence of the colonies. Colonial War The army participated in colonial war (Portuguese Colonial War) from 1961 to 1974, in Angola, Goa, Mozambique, Portuguese Guinea and Cape Verde. At the other oversees possessions, East Timor and São Tomé and Príncipe, there was a military presence but no guerrilla organizations. In 1961, the isolated and relatively small Portuguese Army suffered a defeat (Invasion of Goa) against a largely superior Indian Army in the colony of Portuguese India, which was subsequently lost to the Union of India in the same invasion. The counterinsurgency campaigns in Africa had various degrees of success ranging from almost victory in Angola to total and conventional war in Portuguese Guinea. This war ended after the Carnation Revolution military coup of April 1974 in Lisbon and subsequently independence of the colonies. thumb left A Portuguese Air Force Portuguese (File:Alouette III fazendo uma evacuação sanitária.jpg) Alouette Mk III (Aérospatiale Alouette III), seen in Portuguese Guinea during the early 1970s. The RLI used these helicopters for its Fireforce operations. Each stop had four soldiers called a "stick". Nova Colônia do Sacramento, Uruguay (1680-1777)


Astrakhan

evenly distributed throughout the course of the year with, however, more precipitation (58%) in the hot season (6 hottest months of the year), which determines the "Aralian" type (as opposed to the "Turkmenon" type, with the wet season during the cold months). It's this even distribution of rainfall and the relatively low annual temperature that causes the city to fall under this climate category as opposed to an arid climate. Winters tend to be cold in the city, though by Russian standards, Astrakhan features relatively balmy winters. Summers in the city can be hot, with high temperatures in excess of Wikipedia:Astrakhan Commons:Category:Astrakhan


Batumi

the party capital of the region with a night life to match which increasingly includes big name international DJs on the beach-front clubs. Expect to party on the beaches with Russians, Armenians, Azerbaijanis, Turks and, of course, Georgians. Understand Climate Batumi and its vicinity is one of the important tourism and resort zones on the Georgian Black Sea littoral. The climate is humid subtropical. The low annual range of temperature, with a mild winter and warm summer is a characteristic of the city and of the Georgian coast as well. The average annual temperature is 14.5C. The average temperature in January, the coldest month, is 7.1C and in August, the warmest month, 23.2 C. The annual precipitation is 2560 mm. Showers are frequent. It rarely snows but when it does, the snow melts easily. The average annual temperature of the sea is 16.7 C at the shore. Language While the official, and majority language is '''Georgian (Georgian phrasebook)''', English, Russian (Russian phrasebook), and Turkish (Turkish phrasebook), are also commonly spoken. Russian is spoken by most older Georgians, while English is spoken by many (though hardly most) younger ones. In addition, because of the large number of Turkish tourists, it's not uncommon for locals to speak Turkish, or at least simple Turkish phrases. Get in By plane '''Batumi International Airport''' ( WikiPedia:Batumi Commons:Category:Batumi


Fort Collins, Colorado

long, U.S. Geological Survey. National Hydrography Dataset high-resolution flowline data. The National Map, accessed March 25, 2011 in north central Colorado in the United States. It drains a mountainous area of north central Larimer County (Larimer County, Colorado) northwest of Fort Collins (Fort Collins, Colorado) on the western side of the Laramie Foothills. The '''Roosevelt National Forest''' is a National Forest (United States National Forest) located in north central Colorado. It is contiguous with the Colorado State Forest as well as the Arapaho National Forest. The forest is administered jointly with the Arapaho National Forest and the Pawnee National Grassland from offices in Fort Collins (Fort Collins, Colorado), and is denoted by the United States Forest Service as '''ARP''' ('''A'''rapaho, '''R'''oosevelt, '''P'''awnee). The '''Fort Collins Public Library''' is the public library of the city of Fort Collins (Fort Collins, Colorado), Colorado, US and an administrative department of the city government. The library as an institution dates from the late nineteenth century when a collection was housed on South College Avenue in downtown. In 1903, the library acquired its first dedicated structure by a donation from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. It was the sixth public


Portuguese India

to, from, and between Portugal and its overseas departments was limited in size, due principally to the long distance and low annual income of the average Portuguese as well that of the indigenous overseas populations. '''André Pereira dos Reis''' was a Portuguese (Portugal) captain, pilot, and cartographer. A native of Goa, he was engaged in the wars against the Arabs, serving in the fleets of fortress of Portuguese India. In 1647, he was knighted (knight). He was blamed for the loss of Muscat (Muscat, Oman) (1650). thumb right w:St. Paul's Church, Diu St. Paul's Church in Diu (File:Eglise St Paul.jpg) named after St. Paul (w:St. Paul), the Apostle of Jesus (w:Apostle (Christian)) also known as the Apostle to the Gentiles, in baroque architecture (w:Baroque architecture) in India. '''Daman and Diu (w:Daman and Diu)''' is a union territory (w:Union Teritory) in India. For over 450 years, the coastal exclaves of Daman (w:Daman) and Diu (w:Diu) on the Arabian Sea (w:Arabian Sea) coast (w:Coast) were part of Portuguese India (w:Portuguese India), along with Goa (Goa) and Dadra and Nagar Haveli (w: Dadra and Nagar Haveli). Goa, Daman, and Diu (w: Goa, Daman, and Diu) were incorporated into the Republic of India (w: Republic of India) on 19 December 1961 by military conquest (w:Operation Vijay 1961). *Goa, Daman and Diu were the main Portuguese possessions (w:Portuguese India) in India which remained under the Portuguese rule for 450 years. They were liberated on 19 December 1961 during Operation Vijay (w:Operation Vijay 1961). Both Daman and Diu were governed from Goa till their liberation (w:Liberation) on 19 December 1961. Before the Portuguese period, from fourteenth to sixteenth century. Diu (w:Diu, India) was one of the best port and naval bases and both Daman and Diu were notable. **Kumar Suresh Singh, et al, in Daman and Diu (1994), p. 5 *The twin islands are a perfect example of a place where history and nature meet.The tranquillity (w:Tranquillity) is what symbolises the beaches (w:Beaches) of Daman and Diu Islands. Daman was the Portuguese colony (w:Portuguese India) for over four centuries and joined the Indian Union (w:Indian Union) in 1961. **Prakash Talwar, in Travel And Tourism Management (4 Vols.) (1 January 2006), p. 208


Saint Helena

between falls per year on the higher ground and the south coast, where it is also noticeably cloudier.


Oran

are currently being constructed and floating hotels will be used in addition. Climate Oran features a semi-arid climate (Köppen climate classification ''BSk'' ''BSh'') with mild, wet winters and hot, dry summers. Oran’s climate does show influences of a Mediterranean climate; however the combination of the city’s relatively high average annual temperature and relatively low annual precipitation


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