Places Known For

local influence


Quito

Rico". José Gualberto Padilla, “El Caribe” POR NADIA S. RIVERA CASTILLO "XVIII Hombre del Pasado"; By; Eugenio Astol; El Libro de Puerto Rico Only one of these American groups, that of Guatemala, is known to have had any significant local

influence at the time, and only one of them lasted for a long period of time (that of Havana exists today). Their mission of promoting local economic development, especially industry, conflicted with the dictates of mercantilism, which held that the colonies should remain dependent on the mother country. To the degree that intellectual development lagged in the New World, the Societies also had to fight an uphill battle to popularise Enlightenment thinking in the context of a very conservative culture. 17 12 1994 align left commons:Quito


Havana

José Gualberto Padilla, “El Caribe” POR NADIA S. RIVERA CASTILLO "XVIII Hombre del Pasado"; By; Eugenio Astol; El Libro de Puerto Rico Only one of these American groups, that of Guatemala, is known to have had any significant local influence at the time, and only one of them lasted for a long period of time (that of Havana exists today). Their mission of promoting local economic development, especially industry, conflicted with the dictates of mercantilism, which held that the colonies should remain dependent on the mother country. To the degree that intellectual development lagged in the New World, the Societies also had to fight an uphill battle to popularise Enlightenment thinking in the context of a very conservative culture. Alava was severely wounded in the battle, and the ''Santa Ana'' was captured by the British. However, two days later, a squadron under the command of Commodore Cosmao-Kerjulien (Julien Cosmao) succeeded in recapturing her and getting her back to Cadiz. After Gravina died of the wounds he had received in the battle, Alava became the commander of the remaining ships in Cadiz. In May 1808, Alava defected to Sevilla, where a junta (Junta (Peninsular War)) had formed to oppose the French. After Cadiz had been recaptured by the Spanish, Alava once again became commander of the naval squadron based there. In 1810, Alava became Commander-in-Chief in the Caribbean, based in Havana. He returned to Cadiz in 1813, as its governor. In 1814, he became a member of the Supreme Council of the Spanish Admiralty, and on February 24, 1817, he became Admiral of the Spanish Fleet. He died after only three months in this position. thumb right Lydia Diaz Cruz as "The Dying Swan" (Image:Lydia Diaz Cruz.jpg) '''Lydia Diaz Cruz''' is a Prima Ballerina who started dancing in Havana, Cuba, and trained with Fernando Alonso and Alicia Alonso. As a young dancer, she was talent-spotted by a well-known British dancer and teacher from an earlier era, Dame Phyllis Bedells, who traveled to Cuba and regarded her as the most naturally gifted dancer she'd seen since Margot Fonteyn. Early marriage and exile from Cuba in the wake of the Castro (Fidel Castro) revolution put a halt to her career, which she resumed after the birth of her third child in the early sixties. She went on to dance in the United States with Ballet Concerto in Miami, became principal dancer with the National Ballet of Washington, D.C., and has performed in principal guest roles with the National Ballet of Venezuela, Washington Ballet, Ballet Spectacular. She danced alongside many of the great artists of the day, including Margot Fonteyn and Melissa Hayden (Melissa Hayden (dancer)), among many others. 1907, 1909, 1911–1912, 1921, 1936, 1946 Havana, Cuba Last game in 1946, Southern Mississippi defeated Havana University, 55-0 Cuba The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade was first created in 1912 for occupation duties in Cuba. Earlier that year, the Negro Rebellion had erupted throughout Cuba among former black slaves. A 1st Provisional Marine Regiment of 450 men under Colonel (US Colonel) Lincoln Karmany was assembled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 22 May. At the same time, a 2nd Provisional Marine Regiment of 750 men under Colonel James Mahoney assembled at Key West, Florida. The two regiments sailed for Cuba aboard the USS ''Prairie'' (USS Prairie (AD-5)), with 1st Battalion, 2nd Regiment, landing at Havana and the remainder of the force at Guantanamo. There they combined to form the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade in early June under Karmany, and the United States Marines fanned out in Oriente Province, occupying 26 towns and controlling all rail traffic in the area. WikiPedia:Havana Dmoz:Regional Caribbean Cuba Localities Havana commons:La Habana


Buenos Aires

significant local influence at the time, and only one of them lasted for a long period of time (that of Havana exists today). Their mission of promoting local economic development, especially industry, conflicted with the dictates of mercantilism, which held that the colonies should remain dependent on the mother country. To the degree that intellectual development lagged in the New World, the Societies also had to fight an uphill battle to popularise Enlightenment thinking in the context of a very conservative culture. birth_date Commons:Category:Buenos Aires Wikipedia:Buenos Aires Dmoz:Regional South America Argentina Provinces Buenos Aires City


Seattle

birth_place Seattle, United States death_date '''Caroline Leaf''' (born August 12, 1946 in Seattle, Washington (Washington (U.S. state))) is a Canadian-American filmmaker and animator. DATE OF BIRTH August 12, 1946 PLACE OF BIRTH Seattle, United States DATE OF DEATH In 1847 a disastrous conflict with the Suquamish devastated the Chimakum, effectively wiping them out.


Norway

contacts and, regarding the local chambers (the most common level of organization), to demonstrate a commitment to the local economy. Though governments are not required to consult chambers on proposed laws, the chambers are often contacted given their local influence and membership numbers. Vikernes was born near Bergen, Norway. In 1991, he founded the one-man music project Burzum, which quickly became popular within the early Norwegian black metal scene. In 1992, he joined


Italy

Spanish , so if you speak Spanish, locals will generally be able to puzzle you out with some difficulty, and you will also find it easy to pick up Italian. Every region in Italy has a distinct native Romance language in addition to Italian that may or may not be the native language of the locals depending on the area: in areas like Rome or Milan the spoken language is nowadays mostly Italian with slight local influence, whereas in rural areas the local language is more common; though people will usually be bilingual. Even though Italians call the native languages "dialects" they are in practice separate languages, much like Chinese languages; they have their own way of writing and don't always belong to the same language family as Italian. A good phrasebook will be very useful if you're going anywhere remote, while in most big cities you will find many people understanding English, Spanish or French. But even in those areas Italians will be happy to hear you trying to speak Italian or the local language, and will try to understand you even if you are making many mistakes. If you want your errors to be corrected to help you better learn the language, don't forget to ask before starting a conversation. Some Italians may choose not to correct you otherwise, out of politeness. They also appreciate your efforts to speak their language, even if you do it badly, and won't make too much fuss about your mistakes. '''English''' is spoken at varied levels of proficiency in the well-traveled touristic areas where it may be used by shopkeepers and tourist operators. In the cities you can often speak English with people under the age of 40: almost everyone has had to take an English class in school (two hours per week) since the 1980s, and it is widely spoken by those working in the academic fields such as researchers and university lecturers. However, due to a lack of exposure and practice, English proficiency among the general Italian population tends to be poor, with only a minority being conversant in it, and most people's knowledge of English being restricted to nothing more than a few basic words and phrases. Senior citizens rarely know English, but they'll try to help you anyway with gestures or similar words and they will most surely assume you understand Italian. If you are going to speak in English, make sure you begin the conversation in Italian and ask if the person understands English before proceeding. Speaking in a foreign language while assuming it will be understood will be considered very arrogant and impolite by many Italians. In South Tyrol the majority of people also speak Austro-Bavarian, a Germanic language closely related to German, as their native language (except in the region's capital Bolzano), and German (which is spoken by almost all Austro-Bavarian speakers) is an official language of the autonomous province in addition to Italian, because those regions used to be part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until the end of World War I. The '''Romance''' languages Spanish, French and Portuguese, are not as widely spoken but as they are broadly similar to Italian many will recognize some words thus making yourself understood. In the northwesternmost Valle d'Aosta region there is a Franco-Provençal speaking minority. In the northern part of Italy, there are small pockets of other Romance languages like Ladin, a Rhaeto-Romance language related to Switzerland's Romansh. Friulano, another Rhaeto-Romance language, is still spoken by a small minority in the border province near Slovenia. There are several small pockets of Greek-speaking communities in the southern regions of Calabria and Puglia and there are an estimated 100,000 Albanian speakers in Puglia, Calabria and Sicily—some of whom migrated in the Middle Ages and thus speak the rather medieval-sounding Arberesh (Arberesh phrasebook) language. Italian is the only official language of Italy but some regions have other language which are also official: German in South Tyrol, Slovene in Friuli-Venezia Giulia and French in Valle d'Aosta. Slovene is a native language in parts of Friuli-Venezia Giulia alongside Italian and is widely spoken in villages near the Slovenian border and Trieste. In almost all cases Slovene speakers will also speak Italian and the Slovene minority will often speak better English than those whose native language is Italian. See There is so much to see in Italy that it is difficult to know where to begin. Virtually every small village has an interesting location or two, plus a couple of other things to see. * '''Etruscan Italy.''' If you have limited time and no potential to travel outside the main cities, then don't miss the amazing collection at the Etruscan Museum at Villa Giulia in Rome. Hiring a car gives access to the painted tombs and museum of Tarquinia or the enormous burial complex at Cerveteri and those are just the sites within easy reach of Rome. thumb right 250px Roman bikinis. Mosaic from the Villa Romana at Piazza Armerina (File:Bikini mosaic.jpg), Sicily. * '''The Greek Influence.''' Well-preserved Greek temples at Agrigento in the southwest of Sicily and at Paestum, just south of Naples, give a good understanding of the extent of Greek influence on Italy. * '''Roman ruins.''' From the south, in Sicily, to the north of the country Italy is full of reminders of the Roman empire. In Taormina, Sicily check out the Roman theatre, with excellent views of Mt. Etna on a clear day. Also in Sicily, don't miss the well-preserved mosaics at Piazza Armerina. Moving north to just south of Naples, you find Pompeii and Herculaneum, covered in lava by Mt. Vesuvius and, as a result, amazingly well preserved. To Rome and every street in the center seems to have a few pieces of inscribed Roman stone built into more recent buildings. Don't miss the Colosseum, the Roman Forum, the Aqueducts, the Appian Way, and a dozen or so museums devoted to Roman ruins. Further north, the Roman amphitheatre at Verona is definitely not to be missed. thumb right 250px Florence's cathedral; bell tower by Giotto to the left and the tower of the Palazzo Vecchio in front (File:Florence italy duomo.jpg) * '''Christian Italy.''' The Vatican (Rome Vatican) is the seat of the Roman Catholic Church. Although inside Rome it has the status of a separate state. Don't miss St Peter's and the Vatican Museum. Rome, itself, has over 900 churches; a large number of these are worth a quick visit. Throughout Italy there is some truly amazing Christian architecture covering the Romanesque (700-1200); Gothic (1100-1450); Renaissance (1400-1600); and ornate Baroque (1600-1830) styles. Although theft of artwork has been a problem, major city churches and cathedrals retain an enormous number of paintings and sculptures and others have been moved to city and Church museums. Frescoes and mosaics are everywhere, and quite stunning. Don't just look for churches: in rural areas there are some fascinating monasteries to be discovered. When planning to visit churches, note that all but the largest are usually closed between 12.30 and 15.30. * '''The Byzantine Cities.''' The Byzantines controlled northern Italy until kicked out by the Lombards in 751. Venice is of course world famous and nearby Chioggia, also in the Lagoon, is a smaller version. Ravenna's churches (Ravenna) have some incredible mosaics. Visiting Ravenna requires a bit of a detour, but it is well worth it. * '''The Renaissance.'''Start with a visit to Piazza Michelangelo in Florence to admire the famous view. Then set about exploring the many museums, both inside and outside Florence, that house Renaissance masterpieces. The Renaissance, or Rebirth, (''Rinascimento'' in Italian) lasted between 14th and 16th centuries and is generally believed to have begun in Florence. The list of famous names is endless: in architecture Ghiberti (the cathedral's bronze doors), Brunelleschi (the dome), and Giotto (the bell tower). In literature: Dante, Petrarch and Machiavelli. In painting and sculpture: Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Donatello, Masaccio and Boticelli. * '''The Streets and squares.''' You could visit Italy's cities, never go in a church, museum or Roman ruin, and still have a great time. Just wander around, keeping your eyes open. Apart from in the northern Po and Adige valleys most of Italy (including the cities) is hilly or mountainous, giving some great views. Look up when walking around to see amazing roof gardens and classical bell towers. In cities such as Rome, note the continued juxtaposition of expensive stores with small workplaces for artisans. Search for interesting food shops and places to get a good ice cream (''gelato''). Above all, just enjoy the atmosphere. * '''Operas'''. If you are interested in the famous Italian Operas, they are on play in various cities: Milan, Verona, Parma, Rome, Venice, Turin, Spoleto, Florence, Palermo, Genoa. Monuments * UNESCO World Heritage (UNESCO World Heritage List#Italy) Islands thumb 300px Stromboli (File:Stromboli und Strombolicchio.JPG) * Sicily, * Sardinia, * Capri, * Ischia, * Elba, * Procida, * Aeolian Islands, * Tremiti, * Ustica, * Pantelleria, * Aegadi Islands, * Pelagie Islands * Dino Island Museums right 250px thumb The Uffizi gallery in Florence, regarded as being one of the most prestigious art museums in the world. (File:Galleria degli Uffizi Florence.jpg) Every major city has a number of local museums, but some of them have national and international relevance. These are some of the most important permanent collections. *


Canada

The '''District of Taylor''' is a small town in northeastern British Columbia, Canada, located on mile 36 of the Alaska Highway. Taylor, a member municipality of the Peace River Regional District (Peace River Regional District, British Columbia), covers an area of about 17 km² (6 mile²) with 1,380 residents. BC Stats (2 February 2007), "Taylor District Municipality" (pdf), ''Community Facts''. As it is just south of the much larger city of Fort St. John (Fort St. John, British Columbia), there is a sizable amount of commuting


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