Places Known For

lively interest


Smolensk Oblast

in the Smolensk (Smolensk Oblast) Guberniya of the Russian Empire. His father was a wealthy retired army captain, as the family had a strong tradition of loyalty and service to the Tsar, while several members of his extended family had also developed a lively interest in culture. As a small child, Mikhail was reared by his over-protective and pampering grandmother who fed him sweets, wrapped him in furs, and confined him to her room, which was always to be kept at 25 °C (77 °F


Grand Duchy of Baden

; for epistemological and ontological (ontology) purposes. For example, to say that a sentence is "true" is sometimes equated with saying that it 'commands assent' (i.e., that it ''ought'' to be believed). Bauch, however, was a rather unorthodox scion of the Badensian school, so much so that some commentators regard him as representing a distinct variety of Neo-Kantianism. While Bauch shared an interest in the philosophy of value, he also had a much more lively interest in the philosophy of mathematics and logic than was common among the Badensian Neo-Kantians. Unlike Rickert, he was sympathetic to Gottlob Frege's logicism (which Rickert had rejected on the old-fashioned Kantian grounds that logic was analytic, mathematics synthetic), and was conciliatory toward the Marburg Neo-Kantians' belief in the unity of logic and mathematics. In the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, Werder greatly distinguished himself at Gitschin (Battle of Gitschin) and Königgratz (Battle of Königgrätz) at the head of the 3rd division. He returned home with the rank of lieutenant-general and the Order Pour le Mérite. In 1870, at first employed with the 3rd Army Headquarters and in command of the Württemberg (Kingdom of Württemberg) and Baden (Grand Duchy of Baden) forces, he was after the Battle of Worth entrusted with the operations against Strasbourg, which he captured after a long and famous siege (Siege of Strasbourg). In 1805 Achern again became part of what was then the Grand Duchy of Baden and was made a district court seat. In 1808 it was awarded City status. In 1924 the district of Achern was dissolved and became part of the district of Bühl (Bühl (Baden)) which was awarded County status in 1939. date_event1 May 6, 1622 event_end Mediatised (German Mediatisation) to Baden (Grand Duchy of Baden), France (Second French Empire) Background After the Battle of Worth, Crown Prince Frederick (Friedrich III of Germany (Hohenzollern)) detached General von Werder (Karl Wilhelm Friedrich August Leopold, Count von Werder) to move south against the fortress of Strasbourg. At the time, Strasbourg (along with Metz) was considered to be one of the strongest fortresses in France. Werder's force was made up of 40,000 troops from Württemberg (Kingdom of Württemberg) and Baden (Grand Duchy of Baden), which lay just across the Rhine River from Strasbourg. The French garrison of 17,000 was under the command of the 68-year-old General Uhrich (Jean Jacques Alexis Uhrich). Kling was born in Bammental in the Grand Duchy of Baden. He completed his training as a salesman in 1916-1921, and was an employee in Dortmund until 1924. He worked for various building companies until 1928, was unemployed until 1929, and was the editor of the newspaper ''Berlin am Morgen'' between 1929 and 1933. Early life He was born and raised in Heidelberg, Grand Duchy of Baden, German Empire (now Baden-Württemberg, Germany). His parents were Louis Carl ''Moritz'' Sommerlath (1860–1930) who was born in Chicago, Illinois in the United States who was from an armigerous (Coat of arms) family of the German (Germans) Bourgeoisie, and his wife ''Erna'' Sophie Christine Waldau (1864–1944). Genealogics - Leo van de Pas - Walther Sommerlath. In the mid 1920s, Walther Sommerlath moved to São Paulo, Brazil where he worked for the steel company Acus Roechling Boulerus do Brasil, a subsidiary in the German steel group Roechling. In 1837, Baden (Grand Duchy of Baden) joined the South German Monetary Union. This caused the Gulden to be reduced slightly in size, as it was now worth four sevenths of a Prussian Thaler (Prussian thaler). After various requests from the Catholics of Switzerland, Pope Pius VII put an end to Wessenberg's reformist plans in that part of the diocese by severing the Swiss cantons from the Diocese of Constance, in a Brief of 21 October, 1814. On 2 November of the same year the Pope ordered Bishop Dalberg to depose Wessenberg without delay from the office of vicar-general. Dalberg kept the Pope's order secret, though in the beginning of 1815 he temporarily replaced Wessenberg as Vicar general by Canon von Roll for private reasons. In the summer of 1815 he requested the government of Baden (Grand Duchy of Baden) to confirm the appointment of Wessenberg as his coadjutor bishop with the right of succession. The government acceded to Dalberg's wish, but Rome refused to recognize the coadjutorship. After working at the Duke of Baden Brewery of the Black Forest region in Baden (Grand Duchy of Baden), Germany (German Empire), Francis Xavier Matt I immigrated to the United States in 1880. Matt worked at the Charles Bierbauer Brewery as lead salesman and brewmaster in Utica for a few years before reorganizing it into The West End Brewing Company in 1888. right thumb 150px alt Napoleon hoped to wipe out Hiller's command. Napoleon hoped to wipe out Hiller's command. (Image:Napoleon-imperial-guard.png) On 1 May, Legrand and 1,400 troops caught up with Schustekh's 850-man rear guard between Riedau and Kallham. The Dragoon Regiment of the Grand Duchy of Baden charged the 3rd battalion of the ''Jordis'' Infantry Regiment # 59, which was drawn up in square. Waiting until the foot soldiers fired a volley, the dragoons then charged and broke into the square. After their commander, Oberstleutnant Beck was cut down, 706 officers and men of the ''Jordis'' battalion laid down their weapons. Two squadrons of the ''Kienmayer'' Hussar Regiment # 8 suffered 10 killed, 50 wounded, and 23 captured. The Badeners reported losing only three killed and 10 wounded, though a large number of their horses were killed. Smith, 296 There was a clash between General of Division Claude Carra Saint-Cyr's vanguard and General-Major (Brigadier General) Frederick Bianchi, Duke of Casalanza on 2 May at Räffelding, three kilometers southeast of Eferding. The Baden Dragoons lost 14 casualties, while Austrian losses were unreported. Smith, 297


Chiapas

-in-acapulco As early as 1926, Torsvan took part as a photographer in an archeological expedition to the state of Chiapas led by Enrique Juan Palacios; one of the few photographs showing probably B. Traven, wearing a pith helmet, which is reproduced at the beginning of this article, was taken during that expedition. He also travelled to Chiapas as well as to other regions of Mexico later, probably gathering materials for his books. He showed a lively interest in Mexican


Acapulco

; As early as 1926, Torsvan took part as a photographer in an archeological expedition to the state of Chiapas led by Enrique Juan Palacios; one of the few photographs showing probably B. Traven, wearing a pith helmet, which is reproduced at the beginning of this article, was taken during that expedition. He also travelled to Chiapas as well as to other regions of Mexico later, probably gathering materials for his books. He showed a lively interest in Mexican culture and history, following


Lviv

awarded ''Best International Band''. thumb right Oleksander Ohloblyn (Image:Ogloblin.jpg) Ohloblyn traced his ancestry to the Novhorod-Siversky region of Left-bank Ukraine, which had formed an important part of the autonomous Ukrainian "Hetmanate" in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and throughout his professional career as a historian retained a lively interest in this area and wrote frequently about it. Educated at the universities in Kiev, Odessa, and Moscow, from 1921 to 1933 he taught history at the Kiev Institute of People's Education (as Kiev University was known after the revolution), but during Joseph Stalin's purges, was dismissed from his posts, forced to recant his allegedly "bourgeois nationalist" views, and suffered repression including several months of imprisonment. In the late 1930s he returned to teaching at Kiev and Odessa universities. When the Germans occupied Kiev in the fall of 1941, Ohloblyn was elected head of the Kiev Municipal Council, a post which he held from September 21 to October 25, and was a member of the Ukrainian National Council which tried to organize Ukrainian life under the difficult conditions of the occupation. he desperately tried to save from execution some of Jews he knew but the German commandant of Kiev informed him that "''the Jewish issue (Final solution) belongs to exclusive jurisdiction of Germans and they will solve it at their own discretion''" (in Russian). Politics under the Nazis was not to his taste and he quickly retired from his public positions and returned to his scholarly work. In 1942 he worked as a director of Kiev Museum-Archive of Transitional Period , whose exhibition compared life under Bolsheviks and under Germans. In 1943 he moved to Lviv in western Ukraine and in 1944 to Prague. Upon the approach of the Red Army, he fled west to Bavaria. From 1946 to 1951, he taught at the Ukrainian Free University in Munich. In 1951, he moved to the United States where he was active in various Ukrainian emigre scholarly institutions such as the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the US and the Ukrainian Historical Association. From 1968 to 1970, he was a Visiting Professor of History at Harvard University. '''David Josef Bach''' (Lemberg (now Lviv), Ukraine, August 13, 1874 – London, UK, January 30, 1947) was an important and influential figure in the cultural life of early twentieth-century Vienna. Life and career Polonska-Vasylenko studied history under Mitrofan Dovnar-Zapol'skiy at Kiev University and from 1912 was a member of the Kiev-based Historical Society of Nestor the Chronicler. From 1916, she was a lecturer at Kiev University and Director of its archeological museum. During the 1920s, the most liberal years of Soviet rule, she was a professor at the Kiev Institutes of Geography, Archeology, and Art, and a Research Associate at the All-Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (VUAN). She witnessed, but survived the Joseph Stalin purges of the 1930s and was a member of the reorganized and Sovietized academy from 1937 to 1941. In 1940, she received her doctorate and became a professor at Kiev University. During the German occupation, she directed the Kiev Central Archive of Old Documents and worked in Kiev City Administration, was responsible for renaming of streets and consulted Kiev Archive Museum of Transitional Period (dedicated to achievements of German occupation and crimes of Communists). As the tide of the war turned against the Germans, she fled west, first to Lviv, then to Prague, and finally to Bavaria. She was a Professor at the Ukrainian Free University in Prague (1944–45), and moved together with this institution to Munich where she continued to teach until her death in 1973. In the 1960s, she took an active part in the establishment of the American-Based Ukrainian Historical Association and was its Vice-president from 1965. Apart from military education of the Ukrainian youth, the UVO tried to prevent cooperation between Ukrainians and Polish authorities. The UVO was involved in a bitter struggle with the Poles during the 1920's. The group was treated harshly and retaliated with violence. It was, however, rather a military protective group rather than a terrorist underground. John Armstrong. ''Ukrainian Nationalism''. second edition Libraries Unlimited, 1963. p 21 It organized a number of assassination attempts on some of the most renowned Polish and Ukrainian politicians, some of which were successful. Among such attempts were a failed assault on Józef Piłsudski and Voivod of Lwów (Lwów Voivodship) Kazimierz Grabowski on September 25, 1921, the successful murder of Ukrainian poet Sydir Tverdohlib and assassinations of Ukrainian activists Wasyl Pihulak and Iwan Bachmaszczuk in 1922, G. Motyka, Ukraińska partyzantka, 1942-1960, PAN, 2006, p. 37 as well as a failed attack on Poland's president Stanisław Wojciechowski in 1924 and ''BBWR (Bezpartyjny Blok Współpracy z Rządem)'' deputy chairman Tadeusz Hołówko. It organized three bomb attacks on the Eastern Trade Fair in Lwów in 1929, bombings of train stations, railway tracks, pumping stations, burnt and blown up police buildings (e.g. in Jaworowo, Gródek, Uhnów, Lubaczów) and Polish households; it was also active in destruction of telegraph, telephone poles and committed a number of expropriation attacks - amongst them - the robbery of 100,000 złoty (then the equivalent of 20,000 dollars) from a Lviv Post Office in 1925. G. Motyka, Ukraińska partyzantka, 1942-1960, PAN, 2006, p. 43 The terrorist actions of the UVO became one of the reasons for creation of the Polish Border Defence Corps. '''Szymon Okolski''' (1580–1653), also known as '''Simon Okolski''', was a well-known Polish-Lithuanian (Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth) historian, theologian, and specialist in heraldry. His own clan and coat of arms were that of Rawicz (Rawa Coat of Arms). Born in Kamieniec Podolski, died in Lviv. He headed chairs of theology in Lviv and Bologna. A member of the Dominican Order, in 1641 he became a superior of the Dominican monastery in Kamieniec Podolski. In 1648 Okolski accepted the post of the ''prowincjał'' (province leader) of the Dominican Order in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth-controlled Ruś territories. The center of the province was located in Lviv. '''Szymon Okolski''' (1580–1653), also known as '''Simon Okolski''', was a well-known Polish-Lithuanian (Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth) historian, theologian, and specialist in heraldry. His own clan and coat of arms were that of Rawicz (Rawa Coat of Arms). Born in Kamieniec Podolski, died in Lviv. He headed chairs of theology in Lviv and Bologna. A member of the Dominican Order, in 1641 he became a superior of the Dominican monastery in Kamieniec Podolski. In 1648 Okolski accepted the post of the ''prowincjał'' (province leader) of the Dominican Order in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth-controlled Ruś territories. The center of the province was located in Lviv. * Blessed (Beatification) Vilmos Apor (1892 – 1945), bishop of the diocese of Győr, beatified in 1997 * Blessed Nykyta Budka (1877 – 1959), auxiliary bishop of Lviv (Lwów), beatified in 2001 * Fr. Edward Flanagan (1886 – 1948), founder of Boys Town (Girls and Boys Town) in the USA thumb left Polish sailors raise the Polish flag on ''Danae'' Commons:Category:Lviv (File:ORP Conrad.jpg) Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


Gestapo

political, anti-German or anti-Nazi, the sailor protagonists' conflict being mainly with nature and with their highly paternalistic and authoritarian (and thoroughly Dutch) employers. Nevertheless, for a country undergoing the shock of invasion and occupation, the book with its outspoken assertion of and pride in Dutch identity became a bestseller in the occupied Netherlands and a focus of popular opposition to the Nazi occupation. As a result, the Gestapo took a lively interest in de Hartog himself


Baltimore

University Law School . He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives (United States House of Representatives) in 1978 (U.S. House election, 1978), and was re-elected in 1980 (U.S. House election, 1980) and 1982 (U.S. House election, 1982). “I have for these many years past felt a lively interest in their behalf, wishing that the inhabitants of the colony might become established in truth, and thereby be instrumental in its promotion amongst our African brethren.” Commons:Category:Baltimore WikiPedia:Baltimore Dmoz:Regional North America United States Maryland Localities B Baltimore


Bavaria

formed an important part of the autonomous Ukrainian "Hetmanate" in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and throughout his professional career as a historian retained a lively interest in this area and wrote frequently about it. Educated at the universities in Kiev, Odessa, and Moscow, from 1921 to 1933 he taught history at the Kiev Institute of People's Education (as Kiev University was known after the revolution), but during Joseph Stalin's purges, was dismissed from his posts, forced to recant his allegedly "bourgeois nationalist" views, and suffered repression including several months of imprisonment. In the late 1930s he returned to teaching at Kiev and Odessa universities. When the Germans occupied Kiev in the fall of 1941, Ohloblyn was elected head of the Kiev Municipal Council, a post which he held from September 21 to October 25, and was a member of the Ukrainian National Council which tried to organize Ukrainian life under the difficult conditions of the occupation. he desperately tried to save from execution some of Jews he knew but the German commandant of Kiev informed him that "''the Jewish issue (Final solution) belongs to exclusive jurisdiction of Germans and they will solve it at their own discretion''" (in Russian). Politics under the Nazis was not to his taste and he quickly retired from his public positions and returned to his scholarly work. In 1942 he worked as a director of Kiev Museum-Archive of Transitional Period , whose exhibition compared life under Bolsheviks and under Germans. In 1943 he moved to Lviv in western Ukraine and in 1944 to Prague. Upon the approach of the Red Army, he fled west to Bavaria. From 1946 to 1951, he taught at the Ukrainian Free University in Munich. In 1951, he moved to the United States where he was active in various Ukrainian emigre scholarly institutions such as the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the US and the Ukrainian Historical Association. From 1968 to 1970, he was a Visiting Professor of History at Harvard University. The rule of St. Columbanus, which was originally followed in most of these monasteries, was soon superseded by that of St. Benedict (Rule of Saint Benedict). Later Gaelic (Gaels) missionaries, founded Honau in Baden (about 721), Murbach in Upper Alsace (about 727), Altomünster in Upper Bavaria (about 749), while other Gaelic monks restored St. Michel in Thiérache (940), Walsort near Namur (Namur (city)) (945), and, at Cologne, the Monasteries of St. Clement (about 953), St. Martin (about 980), St. Symphorian (about 990), and St. Pantaléon (1042). Egbert II's death marked the end of the Brunonen line. Egbert II's sister, Gertrude of Brunswick, had a daughter with her second husband, Henry the Fat, Margrave of Frisia (Henry the Fat of Friesland) of Northeim. This daughter, Richenza (Richenza of Northeim) (d. 1141) married Lothar of Süpplingenburg (Lothair III, Holy Roman Emperor), who was Duke of Saxony and later became Holy Roman Emperor. Their daughter Gertrude (Gertrude of Süpplingenburg) (d. 1143) married Duke Henry the Proud of Saxony and Bavaria, a member of the House of House of Welf. In this way, the Welf dynasty gained the Brunonen properties around Brunswick, which they would hold until the 20th century. The situation worsened at the beginning of the 18th century, when the Trentino and the Tyrol were invaded by French (French First Republic) and Bavarian armies, and Trento itself was bombed for six days in September 1703. But the most dangerous menace to the principality status were the claims of emperor Charles VI of Habsburg (Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor) to reunite under the Habsburg crown all the hereditary territories of his house. The bishops continued their struggle for independence against the growing Austrian prominence, until Napoleon's invasion of 1796. Following the 1801 Treaty of Lunéville, the prince-bishopric in 1803 was definitively secularized (German Mediatisation) as a part of Tyrol, a crown land of the Austrian Empire from 1804. With Tyrol it was annexed by the Kingdom of Bavaria according to the 1805 Peace of Pressburg, passed to the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy (Kingdom of Italy (Napoleonic)) in 1810 and in 1814 was again incorporated into the Austrian crown land of Tyrol. thumb 200px The former County of Tyrol divided into the Austrian state of Tyrol (state) Tyrol (File:Tirol-Suedtirol-Trentino.png) (red) and the Italian provinces of South Tyrol (orange) and Trentino shown in blue The '''Battle of Landshut''' took place on April 21, 1809, between the French (France), Württembergers (VIII Corps) and Bavarians (VII Corps) under Napoleon (Napoleon Bonaparte) which numbered about 77,000 strong, and 36,000 Austrians under the General Johann von Hiller. The Austrians, though outnumbered, fought hard until Napoleon (Napoléon I of France) arrived, when the battle subsequently became a clear French victory. Life and career Polonska-Vasylenko studied history under Mitrofan Dovnar-Zapol'skiy at Kiev University and from 1912 was a member of the Kiev-based Historical Society of Nestor the Chronicler. From 1916, she was a lecturer at Kiev University and Director of its archeological museum. During the 1920s, the most liberal years of Soviet rule, she was a professor at the Kiev Institutes of Geography, Archeology, and Art, and a Research Associate at the All-Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (VUAN). She witnessed, but survived the Joseph Stalin purges of the 1930s and was a member of the reorganized and Sovietized academy from 1937 to 1941. In 1940, she received her doctorate and became a professor at Kiev University. During the German occupation, she directed the Kiev Central Archive of Old Documents and worked in Kiev City Administration, was responsible for renaming of streets and consulted Kiev Archive Museum of Transitional Period (dedicated to achievements of German occupation and crimes of Communists). As the tide of the war turned against the Germans, she fled west, first to Lviv, then to Prague, and finally to Bavaria. She was a Professor at the Ukrainian Free University in Prague (1944–45), and moved together with this institution to Munich where she continued to teach until her death in 1973. In the 1960s, she took an active part in the establishment of the American-Based Ukrainian Historical Association and was its Vice-president from 1965. Commons:Category:Bayern WikiPedia:Bavaria Dmoz:Regional Europe Germany States Bavaria


Kiev

Oleksander Ohloblyn Ohloblyn traced his ancestry to the Novhorod-Siversky region of Left-bank Ukraine, which had formed an important part of the autonomous Ukrainian "Hetmanate" in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and throughout his professional career as a historian retained a lively interest in this area and wrote frequently about it. Educated at the universities in Kiev, Odessa, and Moscow, from 1921 to 1933 he taught history at the Kiev Institute of People's Education (as Kiev University was known after the revolution), but during Joseph Stalin's purges, was dismissed from his posts, forced to recant his allegedly "bourgeois nationalist" views, and suffered repression including several months of imprisonment. In the late 1930s he returned to teaching at Kiev and Odessa universities. When the Germans occupied Kiev in the fall of 1941, Ohloblyn was elected head of the Kiev Municipal Council, a post which he held from September 21 to October 25, and was a member of the Ukrainian National Council which tried to organize Ukrainian life under the difficult conditions of the occupation. he desperately tried to save from execution some of Jews he knew but the German commandant of Kiev informed him that "''the Jewish issue (Final solution) belongs to exclusive jurisdiction of Germans and they will solve it at their own discretion''" (in Russian). Politics under the Nazis was not to his taste and he quickly retired from his public positions and returned to his scholarly work. In 1942 he worked as a director of Kiev Museum-Archive of Transitional Period , whose exhibition compared life under Bolsheviks and under Germans. In 1943 he moved to Lviv in western Ukraine and in 1944 to Prague. Upon the approach of the Red Army, he fled west to Bavaria. From 1946 to 1951, he taught at the Ukrainian Free University in Munich. In 1951, he moved to the United States where he was active in various Ukrainian emigre scholarly institutions such as the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the US and the Ukrainian Historical Association. From 1968 to 1970, he was a Visiting Professor of History at Harvard University. Life and career Polonska-Vasylenko studied history under Mitrofan Dovnar-Zapol'skiy at Kiev University and from 1912 was a member of the Kiev-based Historical Society of Nestor the Chronicler. From 1916, she was a lecturer at Kiev University and Director of its archeological museum. During the 1920s, the most liberal years of Soviet rule, she was a professor at the Kiev Institutes of Geography, Archeology, and Art, and a Research Associate at the All-Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (VUAN). She witnessed, but survived the Joseph Stalin purges of the 1930s and was a member of the reorganized and Sovietized academy from 1937 to 1941. In 1940, she received her doctorate and became a professor at Kiev University. During the German occupation, she directed the Kiev Central Archive of Old Documents and worked in Kiev City Administration, was responsible for renaming of streets and consulted Kiev Archive Museum of Transitional Period (dedicated to achievements of German occupation and crimes of Communists). As the tide of the war turned against the Germans, she fled west, first to Lviv, then to Prague, and finally to Bavaria. She was a Professor at the Ukrainian Free University in Prague (1944–45), and moved together with this institution to Munich where she continued to teach until her death in 1973. In the 1960s, she took an active part in the establishment of the American-Based Ukrainian Historical Association and was its Vice-president from 1965. After refusing offers from the Universities in Kiev and Warsaw, he accepted a professorship at the newly established Russian University in Odessa (Odessa University). After becoming Russian citizen and a public servant in 1869, he gave his introductory lecture in Odessa in 1870. His most notable success in Odessa was the foundation of the Slavic Library, while as a professor, he didn't have much success because already in 1871 he caused (as it later turned out - orchestrated) mass student protests. Austrian press wrote that Bogišić "being a Serb was called to Odessa only due to panslavic respect" Zimmermann, 1962 (#Zimmermann), p. 142 and in reality was not welcomed in Russia. He continued teaching but without the previous enthusiasm. When his request for early retirement was denied, he tried to spend as much time on study trips so he even studied, on sight, legal customs at the Caucasus. He officially remained a professor of the Odessa University but already in 1873, following the orders of the czar, as a Russian subject, he left for Montenegro with a task to codify private law. Other commemorations *Repose of Elder Jonah, founder of Holy Trinity Monastery in Kiev (1902) The Akademie's Music Library Itzig's daughter (and hence Felix's great-aunt) Sarah Levy (1761-1854), a fine keyboard player who had been taught by Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, played concerti by Bach and others in many Akademie concerts and at Zelter's "Ripienschule" in the period 1806-1815. Her large collection of manuscripts of music of the Bach family, together with many others acquired by Abraham Mendelssohn from the widow of C. P. E. Bach, were left to the Akademie. Zelter also had a fine collection of Bach and Bach family manuscripts which he gave to the Akademie. By these means it acquired one of the finest collections of Bachiana in the world. The collection was looted by the Red Army in 1945 and hidden in the Kiev Conservatory, but was returned to Germany after its rediscovery in 2000. (See link for the story). Today, the collection is temporarily housed in the music section of the Berlin State Library (Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin). The Netherlands has won the contest once - in 2009 (Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2009) Ralf Mackenbach went on to victory at the 2009 Contest in Kiev, Ukraine with his song "Click Clack", beating runners-up Russia and Armenia by just five points. This was the Netherlands' first win at any Eurovision Contest since the Eurovision Song Contest 1975. Commons:Category:Kiev WikiPedia:Kiev Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Kyiv Oblast Kyiv


Prague

as a historian retained a lively interest in this area and wrote frequently about it. Educated at the universities in Kiev, Odessa, and Moscow, from 1921 to 1933 he taught history at the Kiev Institute of People's Education (as Kiev University was known after the revolution), but during Joseph Stalin's purges, was dismissed from his posts, forced to recant his allegedly "bourgeois nationalist" views, and suffered repression including several months of imprisonment. In the late 1930s he returned to teaching at Kiev and Odessa universities. When the Germans occupied Kiev in the fall of 1941, Ohloblyn was elected head of the Kiev Municipal Council, a post which he held from September 21 to October 25, and was a member of the Ukrainian National Council which tried to organize Ukrainian life under the difficult conditions of the occupation. he desperately tried to save from execution some of Jews he knew but the German commandant of Kiev informed him that "''the Jewish issue (Final solution) belongs to exclusive jurisdiction of Germans and they will solve it at their own discretion''" (in Russian). Politics under the Nazis was not to his taste and he quickly retired from his public positions and returned to his scholarly work. In 1942 he worked as a director of Kiev Museum-Archive of Transitional Period , whose exhibition compared life under Bolsheviks and under Germans. In 1943 he moved to Lviv in western Ukraine and in 1944 to Prague. Upon the approach of the Red Army, he fled west to Bavaria. From 1946 to 1951, he taught at the Ukrainian Free University in Munich. In 1951, he moved to the United States where he was active in various Ukrainian emigre scholarly institutions such as the Ukrainian Academy of Arts and Sciences in the US and the Ukrainian Historical Association. From 1968 to 1970, he was a Visiting Professor of History at Harvard University. The team was founded by a group of students in 1903 in the town of Žižkov (since 1922 part of Prague). Viktoria's main successes fall into the period between the world wars — until 1948 it was the third most successful Czechoslovak (Czechoslovakia) club, winning the Czechoslovak championship in 1928 (1927–28 Czechoslovak First League) and finishing as runners-up in 1929. After the second world war and the beginning of communism in 1948 it descended to the lower leagues where it remained until 1993 when it was promoted again to the highest league as a result of the Slovak clubs walking away to form their own league. Viktoria was very successful between 1993 and 2003, competing in four European cups and finishing 3rd in the league on two occasions (2002, 2003). In total Žižkov has won the national knock out cup on 9 occasions (1913, 1914, 1916, 1921, 1929, 1933, 1940, 1994 and 2001) and finished as runners-up in 1919, 1920 and 1995. Firkušný taught at the Juilliard School in New York (New York City), and in Aspen, Colorado as well as in the Berkshire Music Centre (Tanglewood Music Center) in Tanglewood. Among his students were Yefim Bronfman, Eduardus Halim, Alan Weiss (Alan Weiss (musician)), Sara Davis Buechner, Carlisle Floyd, Kathryn Selby, Avner Arad, June de Toth, Richard Cionco, Robin McCabe, Anya Laurence, Natasa Veljkovic and Carlo Grante. After the fall of the communist regime in his homeland (the "Velvet Revolution" of 1989), Firkušný returned to Czechoslovakia to perform for the first time after more than 40 years of absence. This was acclaimed as one of the major events of his festival, as well as return of his compatriot and friend Rafael Kubelík. He retained his remarkable talents well into his later years and, for example, played a full Dvořák-Janáček-Brahms-Beethoven sonata recital in Prague on 18 May 1992 together with the violinist Josef Suk (Josef Suk (violinist)) (the namesake and grandson of his teacher, and great-grandson of Dvořák). He played only two times at the Prague Spring International Music Festival, first in 1946 performed Dvořák's piano concerto (Piano Concerto (Dvořák)), and in 1990 he played the second piano concerto of Bohuslav Martinů. Zimmermann was born in Bad Freienwalde, studied economics and philosophy at Berlin (Humboldt University of Berlin), and worked for the newspapers ''Vossische Zeitung'' and ''Berliner Morgenpost'' before joing the magazine ''Die Tat'' in 1931. A supporter of Nazism he joined the Schutzstaffel in 1934 and the Nazi Party itself in 1936. Ernst Klee: ''Das Kulturlexikon zum Dritten Reich. Wer war was vor und nach 1945''. S. Fischer, Frankfurt am Main 2007, p. 685 During the War (Second World War), he worked at the German Charles-Ferdinand University in Prague. After the War, he found work at the ''Sonntagsblatt'' and ''Die Welt'' newspapers. Trivia * He delivered the ''Wieser Memorial Lecture'' at the 2007 Prague ''Conference on Political Economy'', in April 2007, at the Liberalní Institut, a Czech (Czech Republic) free market think tank. PCPE.libinst.cz * He was a lecturer at the first and second Liberty Seminar held in Leuven (Belgium) in July 2007 and August 2008. Life and career Polonska-Vasylenko studied history under Mitrofan Dovnar-Zapol'skiy at Kiev University and from 1912 was a member of the Kiev-based Historical Society of Nestor the Chronicler. From 1916, she was a lecturer at Kiev University and Director of its archeological museum. During the 1920s, the most liberal years of Soviet rule, she was a professor at the Kiev Institutes of Geography, Archeology, and Art, and a Research Associate at the All-Ukrainian Academy of Sciences (VUAN). She witnessed, but survived the Joseph Stalin purges of the 1930s and was a member of the reorganized and Sovietized academy from 1937 to 1941. In 1940, she received her doctorate and became a professor at Kiev University. During the German occupation, she directed the Kiev Central Archive of Old Documents and worked in Kiev City Administration, was responsible for renaming of streets and consulted Kiev Archive Museum of Transitional Period (dedicated to achievements of German occupation and crimes of Communists). As the tide of the war turned against the Germans, she fled west, first to Lviv, then to Prague, and finally to Bavaria. She was a Professor at the Ukrainian Free University in Prague (1944–45), and moved together with this institution to Munich where she continued to teach until her death in 1973. In the 1960s, she took an active part in the establishment of the American-Based Ukrainian Historical Association and was its Vice-president from 1965. birth_date Dmoz:Regional Europe Czech Republic Regions Prague Commons:Category:Prague Wikipedia:Prague


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