Places Known For

line construction


Greater Vancouver

Robertson testified in a lawsuit brought by the Cambie Street merchant Susan Heyes, owner of Hazel & Co., in the B.C. Supreme Court regarding damage to her business from the construction, a lawsuit for which she was awarded $600,000 by the B.C. Supreme Court due in part to the fact that there was insufficient action to mitigate the effects of Canada Line construction on Cambie Street merchants. http


Springfield, Oregon

to connect Washington, D.C., and the Washington Dulles International Airport. (DOT had previously agreed to subsidize the Silver Line construction to Reston, Virginia.)


Iqaluit

church service in North America. * 1861 - Charles Francis Hall, an American, camps at the Sylvia Grinnell River and explores the waters of Koojesse Inlet, which he names after his Inuit guide * 1942 - U.S. Army Air Forces (United States Army Air Forces) selects Iqaluit’s current location as the site of a major air base * 1949 - The HBC moves its trading post from Ward Inlet to Apex * 1955 - Frobisher Bay becomes the centre for U.S. Canada DEW Line construction operations * 1958


Metro Vancouver

. The Canada Line, one of three existing lines of Metro Vancouver's SkyTrain (SkyTrain (Vancouver)) rapid transit network, opened in August 2009, in advance of the 2010 Winter Olympics in the following February. Vancouver's airport is the only one in Canada with a rail rapid transit connection. Vancouver International Airport contributed $300 million to the Canada Line construction. File:Burnaby highrises across Deer Lake.JPG thumb left Modern high-rises overlooking Deer Lake


Burlington, Vermont

River. Initial plans had the main line running through Montpelier. However, due to the difficulty of building through the Williamstown Gulf, a narrow valley south of Barre, Vermont (Barre, Vermont (city)), and to land interests of Charles Paine in Northfield, Vermont, a course to the west was selected, leaving the state capital to be serviced by a short branch line. Construction began on December 15, 1845, and the first section, from White River Junction west to Bethel (Bethel, Vermont), opened on June 26, 1848. Subsequent sections opened to Roxbury (Roxbury, Vermont) on September 17, 1848, Northfield (Central Vermont Railway Depot) on October 10, 1848, Montpelier (including the branch from Montpelier Junction (Montpelier Junction, Vermont)) on June 20, 1849, Middlesex (Middlesex, Vermont) on August 30, 1849, Waterbury (Waterbury, Vermont) on September 29, 1849, and the full distance to Burlington on December 31, 1849. The part along the Connecticut River from Hartford south to Windsor opened on February 13, 1849. The '''Vermont and Canada Railroad''' was chartered October 31, 1845 as a continuation of the Vermont Central north and west to Rouses Point, New York, splitting at Essex Junction (Essex Junction, Vermont) (east of Burlington (Burlington, Vermont)) and running north via St. Albans (St. Albans (city), Vermont) and Swanton (Swanton (town), Vermont). A branch split at Swanton and ran north to the border with Canada. On August 24, 1849, the Vermont Central leased the Vermont and Canada, and it was completed in 1851. However, the Vermont Central defaulted on rental payments, and the Vermont and Canada returned to its original owners on June 28, 1852. The lease was later reinstated. thumb 300px 1887 map with connections (Image:1887 CV.jpg) The Vermont Central leased the Ogdensburg and Lake Champlain Railroad on March 1, 1870, extending its line from Rouses Point (Rouses Point, New York) west to Ogdensburg (Ogdensburg, New York). On January 1, 1871, the Vermont Central leased the Rutland Railroad system, giving it routes from Burlington (Burlington, Vermont) to Bellows Falls (Bellows Falls, Vermont) and Chatham, New York (Chatham (town), New York). The New London Northern Railroad was leased on December 1, 1871. On November 2, 1872 the name was changed to the '''Central Vermont Railroad'''. '''Bedford''' is a town located in the Montérégie region of southern Quebec, Canada. The population as of the Canada 2006 Census was 2,612. This small community is just a half hour's drive from larger cities such as Burlington (Burlington, Vermont) and Montreal, and is the home to southern Quebec's largest boy scout troop.


Kaohsiung

Kaohsiung, Taiwan (Republic of China) 7–2


Vancouver

Railway 's western division (as is '''Cambie Road''', a major thoroughfare in nearby Richmond (Richmond, British Columbia)). Gregor Robertson (Gregor Robertson (politician)), who later became the mayor of Vancouver, was a strong supporter of Cambie Street merchants and spoke regularly about hardships from the Canada Line construction.

"Vancouver mayor testifies in Cambie merchant lawsuit" , CBC News, March 23, 2009. He called the handling of the rail line construction an "injustice." "The long and troubled road to the Canada Line", CTV News, August 17, 2009. image 300px (Image:BC Place Opening Day 2011-09-30.jpg) location 777

, since many dingbats have themed names and specialized trim. Dingbats are also reviled as socially alienating visual blights; California historian Leonard Pitt said of them, "The dingbat typifies Los Angeles apartment building architecture at its worst." thumb Canada Line construction at Granville Mall (2008) (File:Image Granvillemallskytrain.jpg) '''Granville Mall''' is a transit mall and pedestrian mall in Vancouver, British


Taipei

in Taipei. Baoan Temple and Confucius Temple are both famous historical sites located in this area. * WikiPedia:Taipei Dmoz:Regional Asia Taiwan Localities Taipei City commons:台北市


Luxembourg

The '''Luxembourg referendum on the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe''' is a referendum that was held on 10 July 2005 to decide whether Luxembourg should ratify (ratification) the proposed Constitution (Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe) of the European Union. thumb right 150px Hamm, in eastern Luxembourg City. (Image:Hamm quarter highlighted.png) '''Hamm''' is a quarter (Quarters of Luxembourg City) in eastern Luxembourg City, in southern Luxembourg. It is the home of the Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial, the final resting place of 5,076 American servicemen, including General Patton (George S. Patton). The Committee's members come from Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong SAR, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea (South Korea), Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom


North Korea

deployed the 24th Infantry Division (24th Infantry Division (United States)) for duty in Japan to Pusan, South Korea. In addition to transporting troops and combat equipment to and from Korea, command ships supplied US bases and Distant Early Warning (Distant Early Warning Line) line construction sites and supported US nation building efforts from Europe and Africa, to the Far East. While working at City Lights Books in San Francisco, Scheer co-authored the book, ''Cuba, an American tragedy'' (1964), with Maurice Zeitlin. Between 1964 and 1969, he served, variously, as the Vietnam (Vietnam War) correspondent, managing editor and editor-in-chief (Editing) of ''Ramparts (Ramparts Magazine)'' magazine. He reported from Cambodia, China, North Korea, Russia, Latin America and the Middle East (including the Six-Day War), as well as on national security matters in the United States. While in Cuba, where he interviewed Fidel Castro, Scheer obtained an introduction by the Cuban leader for the diary of Che Guevara — which Scheer had already obtained, with the assistance of French journalist Michele Ray, for publication in ''Ramparts'' and by Bantam Books. In July 1970, Scheer accompanied as a journalist a Black Panther Party delegation, led by Eldridge Cleaver, to North Korea, China, and Vietnam. The delegation also contained people from the San Francisco Red Guard, the women's liberation movement, the Peace and Freedom Party, Newsreel, and the Movement for a Democratic Military. In geopolitics, the Council on Foreign Relations defines Northeast Asia as Japan, North Korea, and South Korea. "Northeast Asia." ''Council on Foreign Relations''. Retrieved on August 10, 2009. China and Russia are often included in geopolitical discussion of the region to the extent their interests and policies interact with those of Japan and the Koreas. The Sea of Japan, the Yellow Sea, and sometimes the East China Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk are included in discussions of the region. During the twentieth century, paddy field farming became the dominant form of growing rice. Commons:Category:North Korea WikiPedia:North Korea Dmoz:Regional Asia North Korea


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