Places Known For

life stories


Iringa

of Tanzanians, SPW volunteers (watch out for the smell of the villages), depressed VSO and Peace Corps volunteers (watch out for boring life stories), and assorted vipepeo (as per SPW volunteers). * '''Twisters'''. Has a similar vibe to Shooters but has a lot less SPW volunteers and is a little more Tanzanian. It also has a pool table and sometimes has live music. You may find a cover charge of 5,000 at the weekend if they are opening late and have a disco. Food a bit of a risk and service


Chambly, Quebec

placed her birth in 1848 or 1850, and Albani's memoir puts her birth in 1852. She began her musical studies with her mother, and at age five her father took over her


Rosebud Indian Reservation

Wilson Richard Wilson . She also covers aspects of the role of the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation), the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the treatment of the Native Americans and their children in the mid-1900s. Her work focuses on themes of gender, identity, and race. Petrillo, Larissa. (1996). ''The life stories of a woman from Rosebud: Names and naming in 'Lakota Woman' and 'Ohitika Woman''' (M.A. thesis) Wilfrid Laurier University DATE OF BIRTH 1953 PLACE OF BIRTH Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota, United States DATE OF DEATH A tribal university (Sinte Gleska University) on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota was named for him in 1971. History of Sinte Gleska Sinte Gleska University Sioux Indian Museum The Sioux Indian Museum, the next gallery after Archaeology, contains 5,500 pieces regulated by the United States Department of the Interior's Indian Arts and Crafts Board. Most of the collection is from the collection of a Native American arts collector who owned a trading post on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. This part of the collection was collected from the 1890s to the 1930s. The Sioux Indian Museum contains beaded items (Beadwork), ceremonial items, traditional Native American clothing, an exhibit of items made from animals, kids items (such as dolls and games), instruments, Native American saddles, and tipis. There is also a holographic (Holography) Native American elder who tells three stories. '''Lakota Woman''' is a memoir by Mary Brave Bird, formerly Mary Crow Dog, a Sicangu Lakota (Brulé). Reared on the Rosebud Indian Reservation in South Dakota, she describes her childhood and young adulthood, which included many historical events associated with the American Indian Movement. '''Iron Shell''' (1816–1896) was a Brulé Sioux chief. He initially became prominent after an 1843 raid on the Pawnee (Pawnee people), and became sub-chief of the Brulé under Little Thunder. Bettelyoun, Susan Bordeaux, and Waggoner, Josephine (1998). ''With My Own Eyes: A Lakota Woman Tells Her People's History'', p. 154. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 0803261640. He became chief of the Brulé Orphan Band during the Powder River War of 1866-1868. He signed the Treaty of 1868, and lived the remainder of his life on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. Hollow Horn Bear was his son. * After the Ghost Dance (w:Ghost Dance) spread across the Rockies to the Plains tribes it ran amok. ...The fervor attacked the Plains tribes virulently, particularly the Sioux, who were at that time the largest and the most intransigent or them all. The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. ** Peter Farb, ''Man's Rise to Civilization'' (1968) * The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts (w:Ghost shirt)) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. Since the Delegation's press conference, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation) and the Cheyenne River Reservation (w: Cheyenne River Indian Reservation) have rejected Means's and the delegation's declaration of secession.


Van Nuys, Los Angeles

This is Your Life author Mary Desjardins publisher Museum of Broadcast Communications accessdate 2011-03-06 In the show, Edwards would surprise each guest by narrating a biography of the subject. The show "alternated in presenting the life stories of entertainment personalities and 'ordinary' people who had contributed in some way to their communities." The host, consulting his "red book", would narrate while presenting


Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

Richard Wilson . She also covers aspects of the role of the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation), the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs and the treatment of the Native Americans and their children in the mid-1900s. Her work focuses on themes of gender, identity, and race. Petrillo, Larissa. (1996). ''The life stories of a woman from Rosebud: Names and naming in 'Lakota Woman' and 'Ohitika Woman''' (M.A. thesis) Wilfrid Laurier University thumb left ''From a Native Son (File:FromaNativeSon.jpg)'' book cover Churchill's ''Indians Are Us?'' (1994), a sequel to ''Fantasies of the Master Race'', further explores American Indian (Native Americans in the United States) issues in popular culture and politics. He examines the movie ''Black Robe (Black Robe (film)),'' the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation killings, the prosecution of Leonard Peltier, sports mascots, the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990, and blood quantum laws, calling them tools of genocide. Churchill is particularly outspoken about New Age exploitations of shamanism and American Indian sacred traditions, and the "do-it-yourself Indianism" of certain contemporary authors. John P. LaVelle of the University of New Mexico School of Law published a review of ''Indians Are Us?'' in ''The American Indian Quarterly''. Professor LaVelle, an enrolled member of the Santee Sioux Nation (Lakota people), states that ''Indians Are Us?'' twists historical facts and is hostile toward Indian tribes. The '''Wounded Knee incident''' began February 27, 1973 when about 200 Oglala Lakota and followers of the American Indian Movement (AIM) seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The grassroots protest followed the failure of their effort to impeach the elected tribal president Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), whom they accused of corruption and abuse of opponents; they also protested the United States government's failure to fulfill treaties with Indian peoples and demanded the reopening of treaty negotiations. Occupation On February 27, AIM leaders Russell Means (Oglala Sioux) and Carter Camp (Ponca), together with 200 activists and Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux) of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation who opposed Oglala tribal chairman Richard Wilson (Dick Wilson (tribal chairman)), occupied the town of Wounded Knee in protest against Wilson's administration, as well as against the federal government's persistent failures to honor its treaties with Native American nations. The U.S. government law enforcement, including FBI agents, surrounded Wounded Knee the same day with armed reinforcements. They gradually gained more arms. "Wounded Knee Incident." United States Marshals Service. Retrieved May 10, 2007. The video is focused on the case for Leonard Peltier, who was one of the leaders of the American Indian Movement (AIM). The band is performing live in a small venue throughout the video. During the video, footage from the Peltier case is examined and detailed with shots of Peltier and other members of AIM. There is also a reenactment of what took place on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The footage of this reenactment is from Michael Apted's 1992 documentary ''Incident at Oglala''. * After the Ghost Dance (w:Ghost Dance) spread across the Rockies to the Plains tribes it ran amok. ...The fervor attacked the Plains tribes virulently, particularly the Sioux, who were at that time the largest and the most intransigent or them all. The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. ** Peter Farb, ''Man's Rise to Civilization'' (1968) * The Sioux had been forced to submit to a series of land grabs and to indignities that are almost unbelievable when read about today. ...they were being systematically starved into submission—by the White Bureaucracy—on the little that was left of their reservation in South Dakota. ...From Rosebud (w:Rosebud Indian Reservation), the Ghost Dance spread like prairie fire to the Pine Ridge (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) Sioux and finally to Sitting Bull's people at Standing Rock (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation). The Sioux rebelled; the result was the death of Sitting Bull (w:Sitting Bull#Death and burial) and the massacre of the Indians (despite their ghost shirts (w:Ghost shirt)) at Wounded Knee (w:Wounded Knee Massacre) in 1890. Despite those rejections, Archer said that the Pine Ridge Reservation (w:Pine Ridge Indian Reservation)'s council may "consider the proposal." A representative for the Standing Rock Reservation (w:Standing Rock Indian Reservation)'s council has said that that reservation is also considering Lakotah Oyate's proposal. Lakotah Oyate have also been holding discussions with "about 150" other indigenous organizations in the U.S. and mentioned particularly the Native Hawaiians (w:Native Hawaiians).


Medford, Oregon

article?AID 20070923 NEWS 709230322 -1 NEWS title A View of Roxy Ann Peak author Miller, Bill publisher Mail Tribune date September 23, 2007 accessdate February 19, 2008 A significant area of Roxy Ann Peak (including the summit) is enclosed in Medford's largest park,


Chechnya

refugees from places such as Chechnya, Juárez (Ciudad Juárez), Burma and Malawi tell their life stories. The book features original material from well-known comic and graphic artists including Joe Sacco and Phoebe Gloeckner. It was published in the U.S. by Random House Pantheon. It was supported logistically by Amnesty International, which will receive proceeds from the book. After the release of the book, the Center for International Studies at MIT invited

1989 1989 . He turns himself in and back at the station they drink and dance, telling their life stories. The militsiya officer then demonstrates the old wanted poster of Belov, and sets out making him some photocopies (photocopy). As he awaits, Belov's eyes grow in shock when he sees a election poster with Kaverin's face. Kaverin has survived Chechnya, and is running for the State Duma in the upcoming majoritarian election. Rus actively participated, along with other MVD


Malawi

, and Zambia. The largest city and commercial centre of Malawi, one of the countries which Livingstone explored, is still called Blantyre (Blantyre, Malawi), having been named for Livingstone's birthplace during the colonial era. as well as writer James MacKinnon. In the book, four different groups of women and children refugees from places such as Chechnya, Juárez (Ciudad Juárez), Burma and Malawi tell their life stories. The book features original


Bethlehem

WikiPedia:Bethlehem Commons:Category:Bethlehem


Kosovo

url http: www.mtv.com news articles 1449077 carey-others-sing-on-telethon.jhtml title Mariah Carey, Springsteen, Other Stars Sing For America On Telethon last Schumacher-Rasmussen first Eric work MTV News publisher Viacom date 2001-09-22 accessdate 2011-04-13 Carey hosted the CBS television special ''At Home for the Holidays'', which documented real-life stories of adopted children and foster families, from the Wayback Machine (Internet Archive) on October 22, 2001. ref>


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