Places Known For

history buildings


Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan

at the Willow Bunch hospital, also known as the "Pasteur Hospital." “Medical Services,” The Depression: and its legacy in Saskatchewan, Adria Interactive Multimedia https: www.edonline.sk.ca bbcswebdav library materials depression depression english need medical-captions.html “Hospitals,” Willow Bunch, Saskatchewan, http: www.willowbunch.ca wb history buildings hospitals The hospital was then expanded

;ref Willow Bunch Museum Website Palace Theater Closes thumb Palace Theater (File:Palace Theater 2.jpg) In 1973 the town inherited the historichistory buildings theatre Palace Theatre, which was the town's community social centre until its doors closed in 1969. The Knights of Columbus constructed the building in 1925. The building was first used for public meetings in 1928 until it officially


Kingston, Ontario

the parliamentary structure at Westminster. During the War of 1812, American troops (United States Army) set fire (Battle of York#Burning of York) to the buildings (Ontario Legislative Building#History) of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada in York (York, Upper Canada), now Toronto. In 1841 the British government united the two Canadas into the Province of Canada, with a single legislature composed of, again, an assembly, council, and governor general; the 84 members of the lower chamber were equally divided amongst the two former provinces, though Lower Canada had a higher population. The governor still held significant personal influence over Canadian affairs until 1848, when responsible government was implemented in Canada. The actual site of the parliament shifted on a regular basis: From 1841 to 1844, it sat in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), where the present Kingston General Hospital now stands; between 1844 and the 1849 fire that destroyed the building (Burning of the Parliament Buildings in Montreal), the legislature was in Montreal; and, after a few years of alternating between Toronto and Quebec City. In 1866, the legislature was finally moved to Ottawa, Queen Victoria (Victoria of the United Kingdom) having in 1857 chosen that city as Canada's capital. thumb right The burning of the parliament in Montreal (File:Incendie Parlement Montreal.jpg) In May 2007 he received two honorary doctorates, the fourth and fifth of his career. In early May he received an Honorary Doctorate of Divinity from Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, Media and later in the month he received an Honorary Doctor of Letters at the convocation of Memorial University of Newfoundland for his lifelong contributions to Canadian music, culture and social activism. Cockburn previously received honorary doctorates from York University in Toronto, Berklee College of Music, and St. Thomas University (St. Thomas University (New Brunswick)) in New Brunswick. Marketing & Communications index Through a period of study with political manoeuvring, the committee chose the current design, which was created by George F.G. Stanley (George Stanley) and inspired by the flag of the Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston, Ontario. The design was approved unanimously by the committee on October 29, 1964, and later passed by a majority vote in the House of Commons on December 15, 1964. The Senate (Canadian Senate) added its approval two days later. thumb left Giant Canadian flag in downtown Vancouver for the 2010 Winter Olympics (File:Canadianflag.JPG) A plaque commemorating the creation of the Canadian flag was installed by the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) in Kingston, Ontario, circa 1985. Near the Parade Square, in March 1964, while viewing the College flag atop Mackenzie Building, George Stanley, then Dean of Arts at RMC, first suggested to J.R. Matheson, then Member of Parliament for Leeds, that the RMC flag should form the basis of the national flag. The two collaborated on a design that was ultimately approved by parliament and by royal proclamation adopted as the bn national flag of Canada as of February 15, 1965. - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.


Quebec City

into Upper (Upper Canada) and Lower Canada, each with an elected legislative assembly, an appointed legislative council, and the relevant governor, mirroring the parliamentary structure at Westminster. During the War of 1812, American troops (United States Army) set fire (Battle of York#Burning of York) to the buildings (Ontario Legislative Building#History) of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada in York (York, Upper Canada), now Toronto. In 1841 the British government united the two Canadas into the Province of Canada, with a single legislature composed of, again, an assembly, council, and governor general; the 84 members of the lower chamber were equally divided amongst the two former provinces, though Lower Canada had a higher population. The governor still held significant personal influence over Canadian affairs until 1848, when responsible government was implemented in Canada. The actual site of the parliament shifted on a regular basis: From 1841 to 1844, it sat in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), where the present Kingston General Hospital now stands; between 1844 and the 1849 fire that destroyed the building (Burning of the Parliament Buildings in Montreal), the legislature was in Montreal; and, after a few years of alternating between Toronto and Quebec City. In 1866, the legislature was finally moved to Ottawa, Queen Victoria (Victoria of the United Kingdom) having in 1857 chosen that city as Canada's capital. thumb right The burning of the parliament in Montreal (File:Incendie Parlement Montreal.jpg) In 1951, Paul Claudel organized an exhibition at the Musée Rodin, which continues to display her sculptures. A large exhibition of her works was organized in 1984. In 2005 a large art display featuring the works of Rodin and Claudel was exhibited in Quebec City, Canada and Detroit, Michigan, USA. In 2008, the Musée Rodin organized a retrospective exhibition including more than 80 of her works. Senator During his eight years in the U.S. Senate, Fairbanks served as a key adviser to McKinley during the Spanish-American War and was also the Chairman of the Committee on Immigration and the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds. In 1898, Fairbanks was appointed a member of the United States and British (United Kingdom) Joint High Commission which met in Quebec City for the adjustment of Canadian (Canada) questions, including the boundary dispute about Alaska. '''Past Summits:''' * Quebec City, Quebec (Canada) (2–4 September 1987) * Dakar, Senegal (24–26 May 1989) * Bucharest, Romania (28–29 September 2006) * Quebec City, Quebec (Canada) (17–19 October 2008) (part of the 400th anniversary celebration of the founding of the city of Quebec) * Montreux, Switzerland (22–24 October 2010) The International Association of the French-speaking Mayors The International Association of the French-speaking Mayors (Official Website) was created in Quebec City in 1979 on the initiative of Jean Pelletier and Jacques Chirac, then the respective mayors of Quebec City and Paris. It's an operating agency for urban development gathering 48 countries or governments. The goal is to establish close cooperation in all areas of municipal activities. Its missions are to strengthen the local democracy, building municipal capacities, and to support the populations. The association pursues its actions in the domains of health, culture, youth and education, the urban development, training, and municipal infrastructures.


Greece

Regalis'' (1872) and ''A Plea for Livy'' (1873) were written in reply to his critics. Dyer frequently visited Greece and Italy, and his topographical works are probably his best; among these mention may be made of ''Pompeii, its History, Buildings and Antiquities'' (1867, new ed. in Bohn's ''Illustrated Library''), and ''Ancient Athens, its History, Topography and Remains'' (1873). His last publication was ''On Imitative Art'' (1882). He died at Bath (Bath, Somerset) on 30 January 1888


Toronto

of York#Burning of York set fire to the buildings (Ontario Legislative Building#History) of the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada in York (York, Upper Canada), now Toronto. In 1841 the British government united the two Canadas into the Province of Canada, with a single legislature composed of, again, an assembly, council, and governor general; the 84 members of the lower chamber were equally divided amongst the two former provinces, though Lower Canada had a higher population. The governor still held significant personal influence over Canadian affairs until 1848, when responsible government was implemented in Canada. The actual site of the parliament shifted on a regular basis: From 1841 to 1844, it sat in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), where the present Kingston General Hospital now stands; between 1844 and the 1849 fire that destroyed the building (Burning of the Parliament Buildings in Montreal), the legislature was in Montreal; and, after a few years of alternating between Toronto and Quebec City. In 1866, the legislature was finally moved to Ottawa, Queen Victoria (Victoria of the United Kingdom) having in 1857 chosen that city as Canada's capital. thumb right The burning of the parliament in Montreal (File:Incendie Parlement Montreal.jpg) birth_date Commons:Category:Toronto WikiPedia:Toronto dmoz:Regional North America Canada Ontario Localities T Toronto


Italy

and that his views are far too conservative. ''Roma Regalis'' (1872) and ''A Plea for Livy'' (1873) were written in reply to his critics. Dyer frequently visited Greece and Italy, and his topographical works are probably his best; among these mention may be made of ''Pompeii, its History, Buildings and Antiquities'' (1867, new ed. in Bohn's ''Illustrated Library''), and ''Ancient Athens, its History, Topography and Remains'' (1873). His last publication was ''On Imitative Art'' (1882). He died


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