Places Known For

controversial political


Uptown, Chicago

, Chicago Uptown neighborhood in 1972 with her husband Marc Zalkin and her infant son, Brendan, and lived on N Malden Street in Uptown. Shiller drove a cab, worked as a waitress and free lance photographer, and jumped into radical (Political radicalism) politics. With one of Chicago's most controversial political organizers, Walter "Slim" Coleman, Shiller


Cossack Hetmanate

The third important state for Ukrainians is Cossack Hetmanate. The Cossacks of Zaporizhia (Zaporizhzhia (region)) since the late 15th century controlled the lower bends of the river Dnieper, between Russia, Poland and the Tatars of Crimea (Crimean Khanate), with the fortified capital, Zaporizhian Sich. Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky is one of the most celebrated and at the same time most controversial political figures in Ukraine's early-modern history. A brilliant military leader, his greatest achievement in the process of national revolution was the formation of the Cossack Hetmanate state of the Zaporozhian Host (1648–1782). Period of the Ruin (The Ruin (Ukrainian history)) in the late 17th century in the history of Ukraine is characterized by the disintegration of Ukrainian statehood and general decline. During the Ruin Ukraine became divided along the Dnieper River into Left-Bank Ukraine and Right-Bank Ukraine, and the two halves became hostile to each other. Ukrainian leaders during the period were largely opportunists and men of little vision who could not muster broad popular support for their policies. The disintegration of Ukrainian statehood and general decline - Ruina. The third important state for Ukrainians is Cossack Hetmanate. The Cossacks of Zaporizhia (Zaporizhzhia (region)) since the late 15th century controlled the lower bends of the river Dnieper, between Russia, Poland and the Tatars of Crimea (Crimean Khanate), with the fortified capital, Zaporizhian Sich. Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky is one of the most celebrated and at the same time most controversial political figures in Ukraine's early-modern history. A brilliant military leader, his greatest achievement in the process of national revolution was the formation of the Cossack Hetmanate state of the Zaporozhian Host (1648–1782). Period of the Ruin (The Ruin (Ukrainian history)) in the late 17th century in the history of Ukraine is characterized by the disintegration of Ukrainian statehood and general decline. During the Ruin Ukraine became divided along the Dnieper River into Left-Bank Ukraine and Right-Bank Ukraine, and the two halves became hostile to each other. Ukrainian leaders during the period were largely opportunists and men of little vision who could not muster broad popular support for their policies. The disintegration of Ukrainian statehood and general decline - Ruina. date 27 June 1709 (O.S. (Julian calendar)) 28 June 1709 (Swedish calendar) 8 July 1709 (N.S. (Gregorian calendar)) place Poltava, Cossack Hetmanate (today Ukraine) result Decisive Russian victory Loss of Cossack Hetmanate autonomy In an attempt to finally end the war, Charles ordered a final attack (Charles XII invasion of Russia) on the Russian heartland with a possible assault on Moscow from his campaign base in Poland. The Swedish army of almost 44,000 men left Saxony (Electorate of Saxony) on 22 August 1707 and marched slowly eastwards. When they reached the Vistula River they waited for it to freeze and didn't cross until 30 December, then continued through a hostile Masuria and took Grodno (Hrodna) on 28 January 1708 after the Russians had left without a fight. At that time, the Russians had been dealing with a large rebellion of Don Cossacks, known as Bulavin Rebellion. The mutiny was contained in part by the forces of the Cossack Hetmanate led by Hetman Ivan Mazepa. The Swedes continued to the area around Smorgon (Smarhon) and Minsk where the army went into winter quarters. Left in western Poland were 8,000 dragoons under major-general von Krassow. Christer Kuvaja: ''Karolinska krigare 1660–1721'', p.179. Schildts Förlags AB 2008. ISBN 978-951-50-1823-6. As Charles forces were moving towards Ukraine, Peter sent his Moscow reserves to intercept them at Starodub and asked Mazepa to supply some reinforcements. Lewenhaupt followed south and was attacked while crossing a river near a small village that gave name to the Battle of Lesnaya. His forces met the Russian attack, but they were amazed to find that the new Russian army gave them a serious fight. Lewenhaupt, seeing that he was about to lose, decided to rejoin Charles with all speed, so he abandoned the cannon, the cattle and most of the food, driving the soldiers to mutiny. Stealing all of the alcohol, the soldiers became drunk, and Lewenhaupt was forced to leave about 1,000 men drunk in the woods. By the time they finally reached Charles and the main force in the winter, only 6,000 men without supplies remained. Mazepa was hesitant and gathered the Starshyna Council to decide the further course of actions. The council approved the negotiations with Charles. He left his last Cossack reserves in Baturyn and moved to the Desna River for negotiations with Charles. When Peter heard of that move he sent Aleksandr Menshikov to Baturyn and mercilessly razed the city. A series of repressions spread throughout the Cossack Hetmanate along with claims that Mazepa had deserted to the Swedes in order to subjugate Ukraine to Poland, provide Unia (Union of Brest), and root Orthodoxy out of Ukraine. Tsar decrees were sent to strashyna inviting them to Hlukhiv. In Hlukhiv Mazepa was figuratively dismissed as Hetman and replaced with the Starodub Colonel Ivan Skoropadsky. By the end of the century, Polish Baroque influences crossed the Dnieper into the Cossack Hetmanate, where they gave birth to a particular style of Orthodox architecture, known as the ''Cossack Baroque''. #...that the Ancient Greeks credited '''Broteas''', the ugly son of Tantalus, with an ancient rock-cut cliff-face carving of the Great Mother of the Gods in modern Turkey? (March 13, 2006) Wikipedia:Recent additions 57 #...that the Cossack Hetman and the later Muscovite (Muscovy) voyevoda (Voivod) '''Petro Doroshenko''' signed a treaty with Sultan Mehmed IV recognizing the Cossack Hetmanate as a vassal of the Ottoman Empire? (March 8, 2006) Wikipedia:Recent additions 56 #...that '''the Hood Event (Hood event)''' was an incident following the US invasion of Iraq (2003 Invasion of Iraq) where a group of Turkish (Turkish Armed Forces) special forces operating in northern Iraq (Iraqi Kurdistan) was captured and interrogated by the US military (Military of the United States), later becoming the basis for the 2006 (2006 in film) film ''Valley of the Wolves Iraq''? (February 24, 2006) Wikipedia:Recent additions 55


Omsk

in 1904. The following year, he entered a military medical academy, but was expelled in 1906 for controversial political activities. Revolutionary career Between 1906-14 Kuybyshev performed subversive activities for the Bolsheviks throughout the Empire, for which he was exiled to Narym in Siberia where—together with Yakov Sverdlov—he set up a local Bolshevik organization. In May 1912 he fled and returned to Omsk, where he was arrested the next month, and imprisoned for a year


The Bronx

). Local party platforms center on affordable housing, education and economic development. Controversial political issues in the Bronx include environmental issues, the cost of housing, and annexation of parkland for new Yankee Stadium. Since its separation from New York County on January 1, 1914, the Bronx, has had, like each of the other 61 counties of New York State, its own criminal court system On the start of business for Bronx County: BRONX COUNTY IN MOTION. New Officials All Find Work to Do on Their First Day. ''The New York Times'', January 3, 1914 (PDF retrieved on June 26, 2008): "Despite the fact that the new Bronx County Court House is not completed there was no delay yesterday in getting the court machinery in motion. All the new county officials were on hand and the County Clerk, the District Attorney, the Surrogate, and the County Judge soon had things in working order. The seal to be used by the new county was selected by County Judge Louis D. Gibbs. It is circular. In the centre is a seated figure of Justice. To her right is an American shield and over the figure is written 'Populi Suprema.' ...      "Surrogate George M. S. Schulz, with his office force, was busy at the stroke of 9 o'clock. Two wills were filed in the early morning, but owing to the absence of a safe they were recorded and then returned to the attorneys for safe keeping. ...      "There was a rush of business to the new County Clerk's office. Between seventy-five and a hundred men applied for first naturalization papers. Two certificates of incorporation were issued, and seventeen judgments, seven lis pendens, three mechanics' liens and one suit for negligence were filed.      "Sheriff O'Brien announced several additional appointments." and District Attorney (District attorney), the chief public prosecutor who is directly elected by popular vote. Robert T. Johnson, a Democrat, has been the District Attorney of Bronx County since 1989. He was the first African-American District Attorney in New York State. Eight members (Membership of the New York City Council) of the New York City Council represent districts wholly within the Bronx (11-18), while a ninth represents a Manhattan district (8) that also includes a small area of the Bronx. One of those members, Joel Rivera (District 15), has been the Council's Majority Leader since 2002. In 2008, all of them were Democrats. The Bronx also has twelve Community Boards (Government of New York City#Community Boards), appointed bodies that field complaints and advise on land use and municipal facilities and services for local residents, businesses and institutions. (They are listed at Bronx Community Boards). Legislative and congressional representatives Since New York City's consolidation in 1898, the Bronx has been governed by the New York City Charter that provides for a "strong" mayor-council system (Mayor-council government). The centralized New York City government is responsible for public education, correctional institutions, libraries, public safety, recreational facilities, sanitation, water supply, and welfare services in the Bronx. class "wikitable" style "float:left;margin-right:1em" - ! colspan "3" style "background:violet;" Borough Presidents of the Bronx - ! Name !! Party !! Term † -style "background:#def;" Louis F. Haffen Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 1898 – Aug. 1909 -style "background:#def;" John F. Murray Democratic (United States Democratic Party) Aug. 1909 – 1910 -style "background:#def;" Cyrus C. Miller Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 1910–1914 -style "background:#ffe2e2;" Douglas Mathewson Republican (U.S. Republican Party)- Fusion 1914–1918 -style "background:#def;" Henry Bruckner Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 1918–1934 -style "background:#def;" James J. Lyons Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 1934–1962 -style "background:#ffe2e2;" Joseph F. Periconi Republican (U.S. Republican Party)- Liberal (Liberal Party of New York) 1962–1966 -style "background:#def;" Herman Badillo Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 1966–1970 -style "background:#def;" Robert Abrams Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 1970–1979 -style "background:#def;" Stanley Simon Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 1979 – April 1987 -style "background:#def;" Fernando Ferrer Democratic (United States Democratic Party) April 1987 – 2002 -style "background:#def;" Adolfo Carrión, Jr. Democratic (United States Democratic Party) 2002 – March 2009 -style "background:#def;" Ruben Diaz, Jr. Democratic (United States Democratic Party) May 2009 – - colspan "3" style "text-align:center;" † Terms begin and end in January where the month is not specified. The office of Borough President was created in the consolidation of 1898 to balance centralization with local authority. Each borough president had a powerful administrative role derived from having a vote on the New York City Board of Estimate, which was responsible for creating and approving the city's budget and proposals for land use. In 1989 the Supreme Court of the United States declared the Board of Estimate unconstitutional on the grounds that Brooklyn, the most populous borough, had no greater effective representation on the Board than Staten Island, the least populous borough, a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment's (Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution) Equal Protection Clause pursuant to the high court's 1964 "one man, one vote" decision. Since 1990 the Borough President has acted as an advocate for the borough at the mayoral agencies, the City Council (New York City Council), the New York state government, and corporations. Until March 1, 2009, the Borough President of the Bronx was Adolfo Carrión Jr., elected as a Democrat (Democratic Party (United States)) in 2001 and 2005 before retiring early to direct the White House Office of Urban Affairs Policy. His successor, Democratic New York State Assembly member Rubén Díaz, Jr. (Ruben Diaz, Jr.), who won a special election on April 21, 2009 by a vote of 86.3% (29,420) on the "Bronx Unity" line to 13.3% (4,646) for the Republican district leader Anthony Ribustello on the "People First" line, became Borough President on May 1. All of the Bronx's currently elected public officials have first won the nomination of the Democratic Party (Democratic Party (U.S.)) (in addition to any other endorsements). Local party platforms center on affordable housing, education and economic development. Controversial political issues in the Bronx include environmental issues, the cost of housing, and annexation of parkland for new Yankee Stadium. Since its separation from New York County on January 1, 1914, the Bronx, has had, like each of the other 61 counties of New York State, its own criminal court system On the start of business for Bronx County: BRONX COUNTY IN MOTION. New Officials All Find Work to Do on Their First Day. ''The New York Times'', January 3, 1914 (PDF retrieved on June 26, 2008): "Despite the fact that the new Bronx County Court House is not completed there was no delay yesterday in getting the court machinery in motion. All the new county officials were on hand and the County Clerk, the District Attorney, the Surrogate, and the County Judge soon had things in working order. The seal to be used by the new county was selected by County Judge Louis D. Gibbs. It is circular. In the centre is a seated figure of Justice. To her right is an American shield and over the figure is written 'Populi Suprema.' ...      "Surrogate George M. S. Schulz, with his office force, was busy at the stroke of 9 o'clock. Two wills were filed in the early morning, but owing to the absence of a safe they were recorded and then returned to the attorneys for safe keeping. ...      "There was a rush of business to the new County Clerk's office. Between seventy-five and a hundred men applied for first naturalization papers. Two certificates of incorporation were issued, and seventeen judgments, seven lis pendens, three mechanics' liens and one suit for negligence were filed.      "Sheriff O'Brien announced several additional appointments." and District Attorney (District attorney), the chief public prosecutor who is directly elected by popular vote. Robert T. Johnson, a Democrat, has been the District Attorney of Bronx County since 1989. He was the first African-American District Attorney in New York State. Eight members (Membership of the New York City Council) of the New York City Council represent districts wholly within the Bronx (11-18), while a ninth represents a Manhattan district (8) that also includes a small area of the Bronx. One of those members, Joel Rivera (District 15), has been the Council's Majority Leader since 2002. In 2008, all of them were Democrats. The Bronx also has twelve Community Boards (Government of New York City#Community Boards), appointed bodies that field complaints and advise on land use and municipal facilities and services for local residents, businesses and institutions. (They are listed at Bronx Community Boards). Representatives in the U.S. Congress class "wikitable" style "float:right; margin:1em;" - colspan "5" style "background:violet; text-align:center;" '''Candidates winning non-judicial elections in the Bronx since 2004''' -style "text-align:center; background:#f0f0f0;" '''year''' '''office''' '''winner of the Bronx''' † ''(failed to win overall contest)'' '''Bronx %''' '''over- all %''' - colspan "5" style "text-align:center; background:#fdfdfd;" '''''borough-wide votes''''' - style "background:#f8f5ee;" '''2004''' U.S. President & V.P. (U.S. Presidential election, 2004) style "background:#def;" † ''John Kerry–John Edwards'', D-WF 81.8% 48.3% - rowspan "4" style "background:#fafffa;" '''2005''' Mayor of New York (New York City mayoral election, 2005) style "background:#def;" † ''Fernando Ferrer'', D 59.8% 39.0% - Public Advocate style "background:#def;" Betsy Gotbaum, D 93.8% 90.0% - City Comptroller (New York City Comptroller) style "background:#def;" William C. Thompson, Jr., D-WF 95.5% 92.6% - Borough President style "background:#def;" Adolfo Carrión, Jr., D 83.8% - rowspan "4" style "background:#f8f5ee;" '''2006''' U.S. Senator (United States Senate election in New York, 2006) style "background:#def;" Hillary Clinton, D-WF-Independence (Independence Party of New York) 89.5% 67.0% - Governor & Lt Gov. (New York gubernatorial election, 2006) style "background:#def;" Eliot Spitzer–David Paterson, D-WF-Indpce 88.8% 69.0% - State Comptroller (New York State Comptroller) style "background:#def;" Alan G. Hevesi, D-WF-Independence (Independence Party of New York) 84.5% 56.8% - NY Attorney-General (New York State Attorney General) style "background:#def;" Andrew M. Cuomo, D-Working Families (Working Families Party) 82.6% 58.3% - style "background:#fafffa;" '''2007''' Bronx Dist. Attorney style "background:#eff;" Robert T. Johnson, D-R-Conservative (Conservative Party of New York) 100–% - rowspan "3" style "background:#f8f5ee;" '''2008''' style "background:#def;" Democratic Pres. † ''Hillary Clinton'' 61.2% 48.0% - style "background:pink;" Republican Pres. John McCain 54.4% 46.6% - U.S. President & V.P. (U.S. Presidential election, 2008) style "background:#def;" Barack Obama–Joe Biden, D-WF 87.8% 52.9% - style "background:#fafffa;" '''2009''' Borough President style "background:#eff;" Ruben Diaz, Jr., Bronx Unity 86.3% - colspan "5" style "text-align:center; background:#fdfdfd;" '''''individual legislative districts''''' - rowspan "10" style "background:#fafffa;" '''2005''' colspan "4" style "text-align:center; background:#eaeaea;" '''New York City Council''' - Council District 8 style "background:#def;" Melissa Mark Viverito, D-WF 100.% 100.% - Council District 11 style "background:#def;" G. Oliver Koppell, D 81.1% - Council District 12 style "background:#def;" Larry B. Seabrook (Larry Seabrook), D 87.2% - Council District 13 style "background:#def;" James Vacca, D 64.4% - Council District 14 style "background:#def;" María Baez, D 94.7% - Council District 15 style "background:#def;" Joel Rivera, D (majority leader) 91.0% - Council District 16 style "background:#edffff;" Helen D. Foster (Helen Foster (politician)), D-R-Working Families (Working Families Party) 98.6% - Council District 17 style "background:#def;" María Del Carmen Arroyo, D-Indep'ce 98.3% - Council District 18 style "background:#def;" Annabel Palma, D-WF 89.1% - rowspan "23" style "background:#f8f5ee;" '''2006''' colspan "4" style "text-align:center; background:#eaeaea;" '''U.S. House of Representatives''' - Cong. District 7 (New York's 7th congressional district) style "background:#def;" Joseph Crowley, D-WF 84.9% 84.0% - Cong. District 16 (New York's 16th congressional district) style "background:#def;" José E. Serrano, D-WF 95.3% - Cong. District 17 (New York's 17th congressional district) style "background:#def;" Eliot L. Engel, D-WF 89.3% 76.4% - colspan "4" style "text-align:center; background:#eaeaea;" '''New York State Senate''' - Senate District 28 style "background:#def;" José M. Serrano, D-WF 100.% 100.% - Senate District 31 style "background:#def;" Eric T. Schneiderman, D-WF 88.8% 92.3% - Senate District 32 style "background:#def;" Rubén Díaz (Rubén Díaz (politician)), D 92.5% - Senate District 33 style "background:#def;" Efraín González, Jr (Efrain Gonzalez)., D 96.9% - Senate District 34 style "background:#def;" Jeffrey D. Klein, D-WF 64.8% 61.2% - Senate District 36 style "background:#def;" Ruth H. Thompson (Ruth Thompson), D-WF 95.4% 95.4% - colspan "4" style "text-align:center; background:#eaeaea;" '''New York State Assembly''' - Assembly District 76 style "background:#def;" Peter M. Rivera (Peter Rivera), D-WF 91.8% - Assembly District 77 style "background:#def;" Aurelia Greene, D-WF 94.9% - Assembly District 78 style "background:#def;" José Rivera (Jose Rivera (politician)), D 89.7% - Assembly District 79 style "background:#def;" Michael A. Benjamin (Michael Benjamin (New York Assemblyman)), D 95.1% - Assembly District 80 style "background:#def;" Naomi Rivera, D 74.6% - Assembly District 81 style "background:#def;" Jeffrey Dinowitz, D-WF 95.1% - Assembly District 82 style "background:#def;" Michael R. Benedetto (Michael Benedetto), D-WF 81.4% - Assembly District 83 style "background:#def;" Carl E. Heastie (Carl Heastie), D-WF 94.1% - Assembly District 84 style "background:#def;" Carmen E. Arroyo, D 92.7% - Assembly District 85 style "background:#def;" Rubén Díaz, Jr. (Ruben Diaz Jr.), D 94.8% - Assembly District 86 style "background:#def;" Luís M. Diaz (Luis Diaz (politician)), D 94.6% - colspan "5" style "text-align:center; background:#f0f0f0;" '''D''' Democratic Party (U.S. Democratic Party); '''R''' Republican Party (U.S. Republican Party); '''WF''' Working Families Party; '''Indpce''' Independence Party of New York In 2008, three Democrats represented almost all of the Bronx in the United States House of Representatives. * José M. Serrano (first elected in March 1990) represents New York's 16th congressional district, which covers much of the South Bronx. It was, in 2000, the poorest of the nation's 435 districts (42.8% below the poverty line); it was also the most Hispanic of New York state's 29 congressional districts (62.8%) and the youngest (34.5% under 18 years old; 6.7% over 65). * Eliot Engel (Eliot L. Engel) (first elected in 1988) represents the 17th District (New York's 17th congressional district) which includes parts of the northwest Bronx as well as parts of Westchester (Westchester County, New York) and Rockland (Rockland County, New York) counties. * Joseph Crowley (first elected in 1998) represents the 7th District (New York's 7th congressional district) which spans the East Bronx and includes Co-op City, City Island (City Island, Bronx), Pelham Bay, Morris Park (Morris Park, Bronx), Pelham Parkway, Parkchester, Castle Hill (Castle Hill, Bronx) and Throgs Neck, as well as parts of northwest Queens. * ''(Riker's Island, the city's main jail complex, is included in the 15th District (New York's 15th congressional district), which covers Upper Manhattan and utilities facilities in Astoria, Queens. It is represented by Charles B. Rangel, first elected in 1970. In 2006, the Congressional election returns in this district included no votes from the Bronx or Queens.)'' All of these Representatives won over 75% of their districts' respective votes in both 2004 and 2006. ''National Journal's'' neutral rating system placed all of their voting records in 2005 and 2006 somewhere between very liberal and extremely liberal. ''The Almanac of American Politics 2008'', edited by Michael Barone (Michael Barone (pundit)) with Richard E. Cohen and Grant Ujifusa, National Journal Group, Washington, D.C., 2008 ISBN 978-0-89234-117-7 (paperback) or −116-0 (hardback), chapter on New York state U.S. Census Bureau, ''Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2003'', Section 31, Table 1384. Congressional District Profiles — 108th Congress: 2000 11 out of 150 members of the New York State Assembly (the lower house of the state legislature) represent districts wholly within the Bronx. Six State Senators (New York State Senate) out of 62 represent Bronx districts, half of them wholly within the County, and half straddling other counties. All these legislators are Democrats who won between 65% and 100% of their districts' vote in 2006. New York State Board of Elections: 2006 Results Page, retrieved on July 23, 2008. Votes for other offices In the 2004 presidential election (United States presidential election, 2004), Senator John F. Kerry received ''81.8%'' of the vote in the Bronx (79.8% on the Democratic line plus 2% on the Working Families Party's line) while President George W. Bush received ''16.3%'' (15.5% Republican (U.S. Republican Party) plus 0.85% Conservative (Conservative Party of New York)). In the 2008 presidential election (United States presidential election, 2008), Democrat Barack Obama improved on Kerry's showing, and took 88.7% of the vote in the Bronx to Republican John McCain's 10.9%. In 2005, the Democratic former Bronx Borough President Fernando Ferrer won ''59.8%'' of the borough's vote against ''38.8%'' (35.3% Republican, 3.5% Independence Party (Independence Party of New York)) for Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who carried every other borough in his winning campaign for re-election (New York City mayoral elections#2005). In 2006, successfully reelected (United States Senate election in New York, 2006) Senator Hillary Clinton won ''89.5%'' of the Bronx's vote (82.8% Dem. + 4.1% Working Families + 2.6% Independence) against Yonkers ex-Mayor John Spencer (John Spencer (politician))'s ''9.6%'' (8.2% Republican + 1.4% Cons.), while Eliot Spitzer won ''88.8%'' of the Borough's vote (82.1% Dem. + 4.1% Working Families + 2.5% Independence Party) in winning the Governorship (New York gubernatorial election, 2006) against John Faso, who received ''9.7%'' of the Bronx's vote (8.2% Republican + 1.5% Cons.) Board of Elections in the City of New York election results, retrieved on July 8, 2008. In the Presidential primary elections (United States presidential election, 2008) of February 5, 2008, Sen. Clinton won 61.2% of the Bronx's 148,636 Democratic votes against 37.8% for Barack Obama and 1.0% for the other four candidates combined (John Edwards, Dennis Kucinich, Bill Richardson and Joe Biden). On the same day, John McCain won 54.4% of the borough's 5,643 Republican votes, Mitt Romney 20.8%, Mike Huckabee 8.2%, Ron Paul 7.4%, Rudy Giuliani 5.6%, and the other candidates (Fred Thompson, Duncan Hunter and Alan Keyes) 3.6% between them. Board of Elections in the City of New York Summary of Election Results (1999–2008), retrieved on July 21, 2008. After becoming a separate county in 1914, the Bronx has supported only two Republican Presidential candidates. It voted heavily for the winning Republican Warren G. Harding in 1920 (United States presidential election in New York, 1920), but much more narrowly on a split vote for his victorious Republican successor Calvin Coolidge in 1924 (United States presidential election in New York, 1924) (Coolidge 79,562; John W. Davis, Dem., 72,834; Robert La Follette (Robert M. La Follette, Sr.), 62,202 equally divided between the Progressive (Progressive Party (United States, 1924)) and Socialist (Socialist Party of America) lines). Since then, the Bronx has always supported the Democratic Party's nominee for President, starting with a vote of 2-1 for the unsuccessful Al Smith in 1928, followed by four 2-1 votes for the successful Franklin D. Roosevelt. (Both had been Governors of New York, but Republican former Gov. Thomas E. Dewey won only 28% of the Bronx's vote in 1948 against 55% for Pres. Harry Truman, the winning Democrat, and 17% for Henry A. Wallace of the Progressives (Progressive Party (United States, 1948)). It was only 32 years earlier, by contrast, that another Republican former Governor who narrowly lost the Presidency, Charles Evans Hughes, had won 42.6% of the Bronx's 1916 vote against Democratic President Woodrow Wilson's 49.8% and Socialist candidate Allan Benson's 7.3%.) ''The World Almanac and Book of Facts'' for 1929 & 1957; Our Campaigns (New York Counties Bronx President History); ''The Encyclopedia of New York City'', edited by Kenneth T. Jackson (Yale University Press and The New York Historical Society, New Haven, Connecticut, 1995 ISBN 0-300-05536-6), article on "government and politics" The Bronx has often shown striking differences from other boroughs in elections for Mayor (New York City mayoral elections). The only Republican to carry the Bronx since 1914 was Fiorello La Guardia in 1933, 1937 and 1941 (and in the latter two elections, only because his 30-32% vote on the American Labor Party line was added to 22-23% as a Republican). (The Republican line exceeded the ALP's in every other borough) The Bronx was thus the only borough not carried by the successful Republican re-election campaigns of Mayors Rudolph Giuliani in 1997 and Michael Bloomberg in 2005. The anti-war Socialist (Socialist Party of America) campaign of Morris Hillquit in the 1917 mayoral election (New York City mayoral election, 1917) won over 31% of the Bronx's vote, putting him second and well ahead of the 20% won by the incumbent pro-war Fusion Mayor John P. Mitchel, who came in second (ahead of Hillquit) everywhere else and outpolled Hillquit city-wide by 23.2% to 21.7%. To see a comparison of borough votes for Mayor, see New York City mayoral elections#How the boroughs voted border "2" cellpadding "3" cellspacing "0" style "margin:auto; margin:1em 1em 1em 0; border:1px #aaa solid; border-collapse:collapse; font-size:100%;" colspan "8" style "background:#d5d5d5;" United States law enforcement officials announced the arrest Thursday of four men in connection with a plot to blow up two synagogues in The Bronx (w:The Bronx), a borough of New York City (New York, New York), and shoot down military airplanes flying out of the Stewart Air National Guard Base (w:Stewart Air National Guard Base). thumb left Satellite photo of Stewart Air National Guard Base (File:Stewartafb-ny-20apr1994.jpg)


Taipei

metropolitan area or city proper itself. In political terms, "Taipei" can occasionally be used as a synecdoche regarding the sovereignty of Taiwan. Due to the ongoing controversial political status of Taiwan, a designated name ''Chinese Taipei'' is in common use when Taiwanese governmental representatives or national teams participate in some international organizations (which may required an UN statehood (Member states of the United Nations)) in order to avoid extensive political effects by using other names. Before the city was founded by Chinese immigrants in the early 18th century, the region of Taipei Basin was mainly inhabited by the indigenous people (Taiwanese aborigines) known as the Ketagalan. In the 19th century, the city rapidly grew in importance due to significant growth of international trades. WikiPedia:Taipei Dmoz:Regional Asia Taiwan Localities Taipei City commons:台北市


Kosovo

Gini_rank 121 HDI_year 2013 HDI_change increase HDI 0.786 HDI_ref "Kosovo Human Development Report 2014" ref


Hamilton, Ontario

and creator's rights, and his controversial political, philosophical and religious beliefs. DATE OF BIRTH May 17, 1956 PLACE OF BIRTH Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), Ontario, Canada DATE OF DEATH The Clearview (Clearview (typeface)) typeface, developed by U.S. researchers to provide improved legibility, is permitted for light legend on dark backgrounds under FHWA interim approval. Clearview has seen widespread use by state departments of transportation in Arkansas


Quebec City

in the city with 443,100 listeners, up from 380,500 earlier in the year. (18


Zimbabwe

WikiPedia:Zimbabwe Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Commons:category:Zimbabwe


Russian Empire

Empire began to advance into the Kurils in the early 17th century. Although the Russians often sent expedition parties for research and hunted sea otters, they never went south of Urup island. '''East Turkestan''' (also '''Eastern Turkistan''', '''Chinese Turkestan''', and other variants) is a controversial political term with multiple meanings depending on context and usage. Historically, the term was invented by Russian (Russian Empire) Turkology

Party in 1904. The following year, he entered a military medical academy, but was expelled in 1906 for controversial political activities. placeofburial birth_place Alexandrovsk, Russian Empire (present day Zaporizhia, Ukraine) death_place Sevastopol thumb right Nestor Makhno (File:Makhno en 1918.JPG) (1918), future leader of the Free Territory, was still a minor militia leader when he first encountered Nikiforova When the October Revolution took place


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017