Places Known For

called wild


Flathead Indian Reservation

and water for irrigation. The lake has an irregularly-shaped shoreline and a dozen small islands, the largest of which is a state park called Wild Horse Island. These islands cover 5.5 square miles (14.2 square kilometers). Besides the Flathead River, the Swan River (Swan River (Montana)) (known also as the Bigfork River where it enters the lake) is the lake's other major tributary. The lake is inhabited by the native bull trout and cutthroat trout, as well as the non


Winter Haven, Florida

theme parks in the U.S. states of Florida and Georgia (Georgia (U.S. state)). They are Wild Adventures in Valdosta, Georgia (Valdosta, GA) and Cypress Gardens Adventure Park (Cypress Gardens) in Winter Haven, Florida. It also owned a radio station in South Georgia called Wild Adventures Radio 92.1FM. Due to Bankruptcy problems both parks have been sold off. Wild Adventures was sold to the Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation and Cypress Gardens was sold to Land


Lutsk

Ruthenian settled population and became the so-called ''Wild Steppe'' (Wild Fields) (i.e., territory of the princedom of Pereyaslavl). After the Tatar-Mongol invasion these territories become an object of expansion of the Polish kingdom (Kingdom of Poland (1385–1569)) and the Lithuanian princedom (Grand Duchy of Lithuania). For example, in the first half of 14th century Kiev, the Dniepr region, also the region between the rivers Pripyat (Pripyat River) and Daugava River West Dvina


Swaziland

. Maize-based dishes are popular, and mealie or pap (similar to porridge) is a staple. Beans, groundnuts, pumpkin, avocado and sour milk are also common ingredients. Dried and cooked local meats, such as antelope (often called 'wild meat' by locals), are widely available at tourist restaurants. "Chicken dust" is a cheap local bbq meal; basically chicken grilled in the open served with a salad and mealie. It is popular both with locals and absolutely delicious. Of course, take appropriate precautions as it is a street vendor food. Sweet breads, vegetables and fruits are often available from roadside merchants. If you're craving pasta, imported olive oil, Nestle chocolate, Herbal Essences and Carlsberg, head over to the Hub, at Manzini: a huge Spar with everything you could need (at an appropriately inflated price). There are several coffee-shops and restaurants around the Hub, also: be aware that the lavatories are located separately, down the stairs, and you have to pay to use them. Manzini's bustling markets and local shops yield all kinds of interesting foodstuffs, along with the ubiquitous KFC. Drink Marula is locally brewed during the marula season. It may be difficult to find; ask locals as it is home-brewed. There is a vibrant nightlife in Swaziland ranging from traditional dances to bars and nightclubs. If you're staying in Ezulwini, there are four bars at the Royal Swazi hotel; why not check out the Why Not nightclub too? If you're in the Malkerns area, the House on Fire is extremely popular: local art, local and national DJs, an open-air setting and live acts. Sleep Swaziland is a small country and it is easy to get anywhere in the country during one day. If you're watching the pennies, head to Veki's Guesthouse or Grifter's Backpackers in Mbabane, which costs around SZL120 per night for a bunk. If you want to push the boat out, book a room at the Mountain Inn which has outstanding accommodation, facilities and leisure opportunities. The most sought-after hotels in Swaziland tend to be located in Ezulwini Valley between the two major cities, Mbabane and Manzini. (Don't forget to pick up beautiful local crafts from the roadside stalls on the way.) With four bars, a restaurant, a casino, golf, swimming, tennis and 411 rooms and suites, the Royal Sun Swazi epitomises luxury. The Royal Villas, also found in Ezulwini, spread 56 rooms across 14 villas and are extremely luxurious, offering excellent food, atmosphere and leisure facilities. The Ezulwini sun offers excellent facilities, also, at mid-range prices. A budget option is Sundowners Backpackers, private rooms from around E200, dorms from SZL120 and camping from SZL70 night. And, if you're heading down towards the Mozambique border, you'll find comfortable, well-appointed country clubs at Manananga, Mhlume and Simunye. Learn Swaziland is named for Mswati II, who became king in 1839. The royal lineage can be traced back to the Dlamini clan. The population is divided roughly between Nguni, Sotho and Tsonga, the remainder being 3% white. The current king is Mswati III, son of Sobuza II who had about seventy wives. He rules jointly with Indlovukazi, the Queen Mother. The primary symbol of Swaziland is not what the West would typically associate with nationhood - flags or monuments - but the king himself. The relationship between king and people is demonstrated through the incwala, a ceremony lasting several weeks which focuses on traditional rule, unity of the state, primacy of agriculture, sacredness of land, fertility and potency. Mswati's relationship with his people has been made even more unique through the introduction of chastity decrees for the under-18s to combat the rise of AIDS. However, Mswati III broke the rule when he married a 17-year-old girl, his thirteenth wife, in 2005. Mswati III has come under further criticism for attempting to purchase a private plane during a period of persistent drought and famine. Dissent grew so vociferous that the media was banned from making disparaging remarks about the monarchy, and the plane in particular. In the third year of drought, further plans to build luxury palaces for his wives whilst his people starved led to mass criticism. In 2005, Mswati III signed the country's first constitution though, in effect, nothing has changed: opposition parties remain banned, and the King remains absolute monarch. Swaziland's main exports are sugar, grown on plantations throughout Swaziland, soft drink concentrates, cotton, maize, tobacco, rice and wood pulp. Demand for asbestos, once a major export, has fallen greatly due to the exteme health risks associated with it. The land is badly overgrazed and overfarmed. This is particularly problematic as Swaziland suffers from persistent droughts. Unemployment hovers at around 25%. This figure is contributed to by inability to work as a result of AIDS. Swazis build their huts depending on whether they are descended from Nguni or Sotho: Nguni huts are beehive in shape; Sotho huts have window frames and full doorways. Living space is roughly divided into three parts: living accommodation, animal housing and the 'great' hut, reserved for the spirits of the patrilineal ancestors. Each chief's wife has her own hut. Land is owned by local chiefs or the Crown; much land has been bought back for the nation and unclaimed spaces are used for grazing and collection of firewood. There is a growing class system due to the expansion of the middle classes. Social rank can be determined through the individual's relation to the head of their clan or to the royal family. In urban areas, fluency and proficiency in English is the main social delineator. There are festivals and ceremonies throughout the year, the most notable being the King's Birthday on 19 April which is celebrated with a national 'day off' and local festivities, and the Reed (Umhlanga) Dance, a three day ceremony which takes place around August when thousands of maidens (virgins) congregate from all over Swaziland. The King is permitted to pick a new bride from their number. Stay safe Swaziland has a much lower crime rate than other countries in the region. However, try to stay in locations where there are other people. Hippopotamuses (African_flora_and_fauna#Hippopotamus) are found (rarely) in the country's rivers, and are one of the more dangerous animals you are likely to come across. They are actually quite fast animals, as well as being extremely strong and with large, powerful jaws. They often stay submerged in shallow water during the day, but come out at night to graze. They can be unpredictable, territorial and very protective of their young. Do not stand between a hippo and the water. Crocodiles are a more common danger when swimming in rivers. Swaziland also has one of the highest numbers of people struck by '''lightning''' per capita in the whole world and it is common to know (or know of) somebody who has been struck by lightning Be careful when crossing any of Swaziland's nineteen border gates. It is forbidden to take meat into certain areas, and the soldiers have the right to search both you and your vehicle extensively. It is extremely inadvisable to stray into 'No-Man's Land', a 5km stretch of territory between Mozambique and Swaziland; several locals have been shot by soldiers guarding the edges of the respective territories. Whilst physical violence is not prevalent (save on weekends when many may imbibe copious quantities of brandy or marula, a highly intoxicating alcoholic beverage), wandering around alone after dark is not advisable, particularly outside Mbabane and Manzini where there is little or no street lighting. Keep your money hidden and, if you are working or travelling in impoverished rural areas, do not eat expensive foods in front of the locals, particularly the children, who, especially if they are AIDS orphans and fed as part of the Sebenta school program, do not get to experience luxury items. Roads outside of towns are mostly dirt. Roads in towns are heavily potholed. While Swazi main highways are generally in good repair, a four wheel drive is essential to see much of the interior, unless you wish to be stranded miles from anywhere, with a patchy telephone signal as mobile telephone masts are few and far between. Other drivers, particularly HGVs, often overtake without warning and without checking for oncoming traffic. 'Kombis', local minibuses which function as taxis, drive at a neck-or-nothing rate with more than a full quota of passengers. Stay healthy Swaziland has the highest HIV AIDS prevalence rate in the world; nearly 1 in 3 adults are infected. '''Never have unprotected sexual intercourse.''' If you happen to find romance in Swaziland, insist on an HIV test before taking things further. There are risks for bilharzia (Tropical diseases) if you frequent infected streams, as well as seasonal risks for malaria in the North-East parts of Swaziland near Mozambique. Be sure to use mosquito nets and repellent where necessary. Respect Swazis are very loyal to the King and the Royalty; be smart about what is said openly. Swaziland is also predominantly Christian, and modesty in dress is encouraged. Swazis adhere strongly to their historical traditions, which are widely practised today. Many who are suffering from an illness will consult a sangoma to determine its cause and an inyanga to prescribe a treatment. It is the height of disrespect to be disparaging towards these individuals or to refer to them as witch doctors. Connect Cellphone coverage is similar to South Africa, even in most nature reserves there is coverage (although it might be weak). There is only one wireless operator in Swaziland, namely MTN-Swazi. SIM cards from South Africa do not work here, unless it's MTN and roaming has been enabled. It's easy to buy a starter pack with a MTN-Swazi sim card pretty much at every gas station or grocery store. You do not need proof of residence or ID to get a pack. Although there is coverage, the phone service itself is bad with many calls not connecting (or connecting to the wrong phone number), SMSes not arriving and international calling being more expensive than in South Africa. Note that Starter Pack sim cards expire within 30 days if not used, and that they cannot be used in South Africa. Commons:Category:Swaziland WikiPedia:Swaziland Dmoz:Regional Africa Swaziland


Austin, Texas

. Shuffield and Zuniga first played together in a band called Big Car. After a stint with another group called Wild Seeds, Shuffield introduced Zuniga to Scalzo, who had played in a band called the Goods in Orange County, California. The trio decided to form their own band, and began playing around the Austin area. On June 29, 2006, the U.S. Supreme Court, with Justice Anthony Kennedy taking the lead, ruled in ''League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry'' that Bonilla's


Dallas

the lead in an MTV video documentary called ''Wild Rides'', narrated by Matt Dillon. He also hosted ''On the Move'' for ESPN and the Miss Teen America Pageant in Dallas. Ziglar later worked as a salesman in a succession of companies. In 1968 he became a vice president and training director for the Automotive Performance company, moving to Dallas, Texas. birth_place Dallas (Dallas, Texas), Texas, U.S. (United States) origin Dallas, Texas, U.S. genre


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