Places Known For

aggressive driving


Inland Empire

in Fatal Road Rage work Los Angeles Times accessdate July 9, 2009 date March 9, 1999 url http: articles.latimes.com 1999 mar 09 news mn-15519 The theft of copper, brass and other metals from highway and road fixtures has also led


Dongguan

is taxi. Taxis are cheap, and a 30 minute ride should not cost more than ¥80. Beware however, some taxis are used for kidnapping. Be sure to only use the green, licensed Dongguan taxis. Buses cost ¥2 per ride, but beware of the aggressive driving. See Dongguan has an exhibition center in Dongguan city houses many exhibitions and conferences. There is also a sports center for locals, and Dongguan library in Dongguan city. Pick up a copy of Here Dongguan, an English-language magazine


Honduras

and HNL677.28 (USD34) for Honduran citizens. By car Possible from Guatemala, El Salvador, or Nicaragua. Cars are a good selection, but you must always be careful since the roads are not as well developed but good enough to have a pleasant ride. Traffic enforcement outside of stops to curtail the drug trade is minimal to non-existent, and drivers should be cautious of speeding vehicles as well as aggressive driving tactics (e.g. passing on uphill, curved terrain). By bus


Indianapolis

. They provide downtown area taxi service, downtown touring service, wedding service, and special events. It provides free taxi service within its service area while the latter charges $5 minimum for taxi service. By Car The general speed limit on highways is 55–70 mph (88–113 kp h). If there is no posted speed, assume that it is 35 mph (56 kp h). An auto is necessary for almost all travel within the city. Indianapolis generally lacks the aggressive driving, bad


Columbus, Ohio

Statistical Area . In 2008, Madison County, which spans Interstates 70 (Interstate 70) and 71 (Interstate 71) as they converge on Columbus (Columbus, Ohio), was cited by the Ohio State Highway Patrol as leading the state for the most number of speeding tickets in excess of 20-mph over the posted limit. "AGGRESSIVE DRIVING: 20mph+ Over the Speed Limit", Ohio State Highway Patrol, Traffic Safety Bulletin, Feb 13, 2008.


Mexico City

aggressive driving habits as a result of the frequent traffic jams in the city. Some traffic signals are more an ornament than what they were made for, such as Stop signs, although most people respect traffic lights and pedestrian ways. When traffic is not present, particularly at night, locals tend to speed up so be careful when changing lanes. Street names and road signs may not be present everywhere so it is strongly advisable to ask for directions before driving your car. Sometimes potholes, fissures, and large-yet-unanticipated speed-bumps ("topes") are common on the roads, so exercise some caution. Even at a small crawl, these can damage a car, especially in the backroads between towns in the Southern area. It should be avised that when driving, a fast succession of white lines cutting the road perpendicular means a 'tope' is approaching and you should slow down immediately. When off the main roads, especially in the ''colonias'', maneuvering in the narrow streets and alleys can be tricky. Often a paved road turns to cobblestone (in high-end neighborhoods) or dirt (if this happens, you've gone way off the tourist areas). Also, some ''colonia'' streets are blocked off behind gates. If you are driving through a housing development, you should beware of children, as they often run on the pavement as if they were in their backyard. You should also be mindful of people on bicycles and motorcycles alike, because they tend to drive in the narrow spaces between cars. The best thing to do is to yield to them. Trolleys have the right of way on their assigned lane, since they cannot switch lanes as easily. Those who are used to having a berm or paved area to the side of the road will quickly notice that the berm is missing on many roads and freeways such as Viaducto and Periferico. If you go off the side of the road, there will be a four to six inch drop off of the pavement. Driving in Mexico City should be avoided if at all possible. It should also be noted that in high density areas such as Centro Historico, Mexico City, there is no street parking available during business hours. Even the best of plans can go wrong when you arrive at your proposed exit at 65 mph, and there is a detour onto some other road with no markings or road signs, with everyone going as fast as they can go. At that point you may want to exit immediately and regroup before you end up miles from where you planned to exit. Maps and road signs likely will be lacking any usable information in a situation like this and your best bet may be to navigate by the seat of your pants a parallel route to the one you found closed. Drinking In many nightclubs, bars and restaurants it is common for minors to drink without proving their age as long as they appear to be over 18. It is also permitted for minors to drink alcohol if they are in the company of an adult who is willing to take responsibility. Drinking alcoholic beverages in the street is prohibited—doing so can get you in trouble with the police. Drunk driving is also strictly prohibited and strongly punished, though it seems highly common in any case. The police have incorporated random alcohol tests on streets near bars and clubs, and if you test positive, you could be arrested and spend 36 hours in jail. The system is very efficient, and you will sometimes see a stopped car or truck with a policeman interrogating the occupants. Smoking Smoking inside public and private buildings is strictly prohibited by law. Restaurants used to have smoking and non-smoking sections, but recent laws have banned smoking in any public enclosed space. Fines can be steep, so if you want to smoke in a restaurant it is best to ask the waiter before lighting up. Of course, going outside is always an option. Smoking light drugs, such as marijuana, is prohibited and offenders could be imprisoned if found in possession of more than one personal dose. Embassies Mexico City is home to a large number of embassies. * Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


Bulgaria

2008. If, for some reason, you can not connect to 112, dial ''166'' for police, ''150'' for ambulance and 160 ''for'' the fire department. Driving Driving in Bulgaria can be fairly nerve-wracking, and Bulgarian roads have claimed 599 lives in 2012 and this is a decreasing figure compared with previous years. Aggressive driving habits, the lack of safe infrastructure, and a mixture of late model and old model cars on the country’s highways contribute to a high fatality rate for road accidents. Of significant notation that the Bulgarian road system is largely underdeveloped. There are few sections of limited-access divided highway. Some roads are in poor repair and full of potholes. The use of seat belts is mandatory in Bulgaria for all passengers, except pregnant women. In practice, these rules are often not followed. Take caution while crossing the streets, as generally, drivers are extremely impatient and will largely ignore your presence whilst crossing the road. Crime In general, organised crime is a serious issue throughout Bulgaria, however it usually does not affect tourists and ordinary people. Bulgaria is safer than most European countries with regard to violent crime, and the presence of such groups is slowly declining. Pickpocketing and scams (such as taxi scams or confidence tricks) are present on a wider scale, so be careful, especially in crowded places (such as train stations, urban public transport). '''Car theft''' is probably the most serious problem that travellers can encounter. If you drive an expensive car, '''do not''' leave it in unguarded parking lots or on the streets - these locations are likely to attract more attention from the criminals. If, by any chance you do leave it in such a location, you need to be sure that the vehicle has a security system. Such an installment will prevent the vehicle from getting stolen. Travelers should also be cautious about making credit card charges over the Internet to unfamiliar websites. As recent experiences has shown, offers for merchandise and services may be scam artists posing as legitimate businesses. A recent example involves Internet credit card payments to alleged tour operators via Bulgaria-based websites. In several cases, the corresponding businesses did not actually exist. As a general rule, do not purchase items of websites you are unfamiliar with. Bulgaria is still largely a cash economy. Due to the potential for fraud and other criminal activity, credit cards should be used sparingly and with extreme caution. Skimming devices, surreptitiously attached to ATMs by criminals, are used to capture cards and PINs for later criminal use, including unauthorized charges or withdrawals, are very common in Bulgaria. If you are unsure which ATM to use, it's best to use your cash instead of a credit card. Also, be careful with the cash you are dealing with. Remember that Bulgaria is one of the biggest bases for money forging of foreign currency, so pay attention to your euros, dollars and pounds. On occasion, taxi drivers overcharge unwary travelers, particularly at Sofia Airport and the Central Train Station. Travelers are recommended to use taxis with meters and clearly marked rates displayed on a sticker on the passenger side of the windshield, as generally these Taxi's charge a normal amount, and the taxis with no meters charge for very unfair prices. One useful tip is to check the price for your trip from a trustful source beforehand, such as a friend or an official at station or tourist bureau. If by any chance you are trying to be lured into such rouge taxis, it is best to reject the offer, or just simply walk off. Bulgaria has '''very harsh drug laws''', and the penalties are perhaps far more severe than in any other country in Europe. Do not exchange currency on the street! It is a common scam to offer you fake money as exchange in tourist areas such as stations. Animals '''Stray dogs''' are common all over Bulgaria. While most are friendly and are more scared of you than you are scared of them, they have been responsible for a number of accidents, so do keep on guard. There is rabies in Bulgaria, so any animal bites should receive immediate medical attention. '''Wild bears''' and '''wolves''' can sometimes be seen in woods, so be careful. Corruption Corruption exists in Bulgaria as in many other European countries. For example, some policemen or officials may request you a bribe for certain action. If this happens, decline the proposal and ask for the name & ID of the individual. Corruption in customs was also once a problem, but has dropped drastically since the country's EU entry. The government has fiercely fought the corruption with a huge success. Should you appear in a situation to which you are asked to bribe, or you feel that you are being exploited, you can either fill out an online query with the police here http: nocorr.mvr.bg , or call 02 982 22 22 to report corruption. Begging Unfortunately begging and random people trying to sell you stuff is quite common in Bulgaria. In the holiday resorts both in the mountains and on the coast there will be numerous people trying to sell you various things such as roses and pirate DVD's etc. Usually a firm no will get rid of them but sometimes they will persist and often ignoring it will not make them go away unless you make it absolutely clear you are not interested. Also be aware that in many cases these people can just wander into the hotel restaurants in the evening so expect to see them standing at your table at some point! In the ski resorts there are many people who sell "Traditional" Bulgarian bells. They know when tourists arrive and how long they are staying for and will pester you all week to buy a bell. If you make it clear at the start of the week that you do not want a bell they will usually leave you alone (for a few days at least) but if you do not say no, or even say maybe they will tag you with a cheap plastic bell to force you to buy one later in the week. The bell men will suddenly become your friend for the week as they try to get you to buy a bell, but of course if you want to buy a bell make sure you haggle! And if you really don't want to buy a bell, by the end of the week your bell man will demand his cheap plastic bell back and won't be very happy! Don't feel bad about not buying a bell as they often charge extortionate prices unless you really haggle. If you do buy a bell however, you will find that the bell men will be genuinely friendly and chatty people and really aren't all as bad as they seem! Stay healthy As a generally rich country in Europe, it's best to say that health standards are developed. However, there are potential health risks, even though the government has fought the high chances of such things with a huge success. It best to stay that the greatest risk that a traveller can encounter is '''air pollution'''. People with breathing difficulties, such as asthma are at a greater risk. Health Risks Pollution is no better or worse than in any other European city. Health risks are the same as those in other parts of Europe, so be careful of what you eat, meaning that if you purchase fruits and vegetables, wash them prior to eating. If you are inclined to purchase food from a stand that sells fast food containing meat, know that you are taking on a health risk to yourself, because there are no health codes in those establishments. If you are at the Black Sea, mind the strong sun at the beach, especially in July and August. Wear sunscreen and do not leave the umbrella in the first one or two days. Do not drink hard alcohol at the beach, it could give you a heart attack. Smoking Smoking is the national pastime, and evading the fumes of cigarettes is even more difficult than evading exhaust fumes in the streets. Generally, during the Summer, most people generally sit outside, which makes matters less worse. As this is a seasonally-changing obstacle, it's best to stay on guard. Since 2012, smoking is prohibited in public places, including bars and restaurants, but restrictions are rarely followed. Eating and drinking Most food is quite safe to eat. The products used in cooking are usually domestic and organic. Of course, try to avoid eating at places that are obviously not clean. Tap water in Bulgaria varies greatly in quality, taste and drinking recommendations. While it is of very good quality and safe to drink in the mountain regions, it is best to avoid drinking water in North Bulgaria and in the regions near the seaside. The mountain regions in Bulgaria have natural springs that are quite abundant and many of villages have one or more mineral water springs. Hospitals Conditions in Bulgarian hospitals may vary - from the very clean and sparkling, with all the latest technological utilities, to the downright drab, dark and cold. There are some new hospitals, and some very old, with old technology. Medical personnel is very good at their job. Citizens of the European Union are covered by Bulgaria's National Healthcare System as long as they carry a Eurocard (or European Health Insurance Card), obtainable from their own national healthcare authority. Dental procedures in private clinics in Bulgaria are of excellent quality. Many people from Western Europe come to Bulgaria to have their teeth done for the quarter of the price they pay in their home countries. Respect Bulgarians are incredibly friendly and very interested in talking to foreigners. Bulgarians tend to be far more open than some other Eastern Europeans and engaging in dialogue with these people is much advised and worthwhile. In smaller towns, especially in the Rhodopes, people may invite you for lunch or even to sleep over. Often it is a pleasant gesture to give someone a "Dobar Den" when walking past a quiet stall or past a person. Kak sté (how's it going) will usually suffice for the younger generation. As a rule of thumb for most countries worldwide, you should avoid topics involving politics and foreign relations, and on some occasions football (soccer) as well. If you are pulled in to such a conversation, try to stay neutral. Remember that your own knowledge of local situations is unlikely to be as good as a Bulgarian's! For certain people, Macedonia is a sensitive subject to talk about, but feel free to ask your questions, provided you do not discuss it with those more likely to take offense (i.e. nationalists and skinheads). Many Bulgarians feel that Macedonia belongs to Bulgaria, but unless you know the subject and the people you are talking to, just asking questions is the best option. Most of the Bulgarian people do not feel anger or resentment towards Russians (unlike a number of people from other former Eastern Bloc countries), and Bulgarians tend to have a much better perception of Russians, however caution may sometimes be needed in discussing issues regarding Turkey. Likewise, discrimination against Turks and Roma people can be observed, but it's mostly because of certain nationalist groups, that are not much different than hate groups in central and western Europe. Bulgarians don't really do chit chat, so trying to make conversation with someone at a till in a shop will probably result in odd looks (either from not understanding or not wanting to engage) or they will just ignore you. Likewise Bulgarians are quite impatient and will often honk their car horn at you if you walk in front of a car, especially in winter in the mountains as they try to keep a grip on the road. Connect Domestic Phones Domestic telephone service is available in almost every population centre (no matter the size), via the PSTN or VoIP. Mobile Phones Mobile phones are widely spread in Bulgaria - many people have two or three mobile phones using the different carriers. There are three networks (M-tel, Globul and Vivacom), all using the GSM 3G HDSPA standards and are soon to launch LTE(4G) on the territory of the country. M-tel is the oldest and largest carrier and as such it has almost full national coverage (97% of the surface of the country), with minore exceptions in the highest parts of the mountains. The other two, Globul and Vivacom, because they are not so heavily used, offer better mobile internet speeds. Fares are average for the European Union (5-40 Eurocent per minute, 7 Eurocent SMS). Both pre-paid cards and subscriptions are available, and special options for discounted international calls exist with some pricing plans. Prepaid cards need registration with a valid ID or passport. Internet access Internet access is widely available in Bulgaria, although about 60% of the population has regular access. Broadband internet is available through cable, ADSL, fiber optics, WiMax and LAN connections. You can also access internet with your mobile phone, via GPRS or 3G. Speeds are pretty fast in the capital - with prices being around 10 € for 20 Mbit s, with local access about 40-100 Mbit s. The speeds are increasing, home access for 10 Mbit s being available at around €7.5 per month. Outside Sofia, speeds are significantly lower, fastest being around 7.5 € for 10 Mbit s. Internet cafes are available in most towns and cities, and in some villages. Computers are usually not available in libraries, or in public places such as train stations, but free wireless access is often available in such public places and in gas stations. Many pubs and hotels will also have WiFi that is free of charge to use. In recent years, wireless access has been growing, especially in biggest cities, but is still rather limited. Paid wireless access is also available. Speeds in Bulgaria are surprisingly good! In fact Bulgaria is in top 10 of the countries with fastest wireless Internet speeds worldwide. Commons:Category:Bulgaria WikiPedia:Bulgaria Dmoz:Regional Europe Bulgaria


Syria

idea of what traffic is like. Especially in Damascus and Aleppo, near-constant congestion, a very aggressive driving style, bad roads and highly dubious quality of road signs make driving there an interesting experience. so do be careful. The only road rule that might come in handy is that, as opposed to most of the rest of the world, in roundabouts, the entering cars have the right of way, and the cars that are already in the roundabout have to wait. Aside from that, it seems that motorists


Greece

in the European Union. Most of this is attributed to aggressive driving habits or talking on the mobile -the driver or the pedestrian. Drivers often weave between lane to lane of traffic to waste less time. Stay safe. Stay healthy Health care Despite a loud call for health care reform from both the voters and the political establishment, the nation's '''health care system''' has received very high marks from the World Health Organization (WHO), a branch of the UN. However, many citizens prefer private health care for longer-term hospital stays. Depending on the age and nature of a particular hospital or clinic, services range from adequate to excellent. Health care is free and universal for all citizens, as well as for all EU nationals upon presentation of an EHIC card (Formerly the E111 form). For non-EU nationals, only emergency care is provided for free. A network of '''helicopter ambulances''' serves the islands, transporting patients who need immediate attention to the nearest island or city with a major hospital. The country's '''pharmacies''' and '''medications''' are of top quality, and pharmacists are highly trained experts in their field. Many medications that can only be acquired by prescription in the US and UK can be purchased without a prescription in Greece. When sick with a simple, common illness, a visit to the pharmacist will provide you with the medication you need. If you are looking for a specific medication, be sure to know its generic name, as brand names might be different. Most pharmacies close on Sundays, but a sign will be posted on the door indicating the nearest pharmacies that are open. Healthcare provision is different to Anglosphere nations in that many specialists are in the community. GPs are replaced by community pathologists. Hotels and tourist agencies can provide advice on where to go if you are ill. Sexually Transmitted Infections '''Sexually transmitted infections''' (STIs) exist in Greece as elsewhere, and travelers who may engage in sexual activity while visiting Greece should remember that even if one is on vacation and one's sexual partner is also a traveler, perhaps from one's own country, neither of these facts suspend the laws of biology. According to recent reports in the Greek and British media, unprotected sex among visitors to Greece, with a consequent rise in STIs and unplanned pregnancies, is especially common at the party resorts favored by younger people, such as Ios, Malia, Kavos, and Faliraki. Condoms are available at any pharmacy and at many kiosks. Natural Dangers '''Sun and heat''' pose risks that summer visitors should take precautions for. Take a good, light sun hat and sun glasses, and drink plenty of water. In late spring and summer, the government runs public service announcements on television reminding Greeks to wear their '''sunblock''' at the beach. The Mediterranean sun tends to get quite strong, and can burn skin that has not been exposed to the sun for a long time. Any ''excessive'' daily sun exposure can also cause long-term damage to skin. Sunblock and sunscreen are widely available throughout Greece at supermarkets, grocery stores, pharmacies, and special stores selling beach-related items, though they tend to be expensive, and the higher SPF factor blocks can be hard to find. During the hottest months, while visiting archaeological sites, wear tank tops, carry umbrellas, and carry water. Daily high temperatures stay at about 95-100°F (35-38°C). The sun is merciless. In recent years Athens has been subject to periodic summer heat waves where the temperature can reach above 100°F (38°C), posing a risk of respiratory problems and heat stroke for some people. Be aware that many islands, especially in the Cyclades, have very little shade to ameliorate the summer heat; if hiking around such islands, including going by foot to distant beaches, it's especially important in hot weather to wear a hat and sunscreen, to take water, and to avoid being caught walking during the hottest part of the day. '''Jellyfish''' periodically infest some beaches and their stings can be severe. The red ones are particularly dangerous. '''Sea urchins''' are common along the Greek coast, usually clinging to underwater flat surfaces such as smooth rocks and sea walls. They usually inhabit shallow water so they're easy to see. Care should be taken not to step on them, since their spines can be painful. It's inadvisable to go '''hiking cross country''' in Greece alone: even in popular places, the countryside can be surprisingly deserted, and if you get in trouble while you're out of sight of any houses or roads, it could be a long time before anyone notices you. '''Lifeguards''' are rare at Greek beaches, though most of them where people congregate to swim are locally considered safe. Some beaches have shallow water a long way from the shore; others suddenly shelve steeply. If in doubt about safe swimming conditions, ask locally. There are no '''required inoculations''' for Greece and the '''water''' is almost everywhere safe (see above under Drink.) Look for 'Blue Flags' at beaches for the highest quality water (which tend to also have good sand and facilities) Respect Greeks rate politeness with a person's '''behaviour''' and not their words. Furthermore, there is an air of informality; everybody is treated like a cousin. They use their hands to gesture a lot. Have fun with this. Sometimes over-emphasizing politeness in spoken language will only make the person dealing with you think you are pretentious. It's nice to learn basic words like "thank you" (Ευχαριστώ: ef-khah-rees-TOH) or "please" (Παρακαλώ: pah-rah-kah-LOH). Greeks generally consider it proper etiquette to '''let the stranger make the first move.''' You may find that on entering a cafe or passing a group on the street you feel that you're being ignored, but if you take the initiative by saying hello first, you're likely to find that people suddenly turn friendly. Greeks take '''leisure''' very seriously; it is a work-to-live culture, not live-to-work. Don't take perceived laziness or rudeness harshly. They do it to everyone, locals and tourists alike. Rather than fight it, just go along with it and laugh at the situation. It can be very frustrating at times but also appreciate their "enjoy life" attitude. They do take politics and soccer very seriously. '''Dress codes''' for churches sometimes include covered shoulders for women and knees covered for both sexes, but generally they don't mind about your clothes as long as they are not very provocative. This tends to be lightly enforced during the height of the summer tourist season, simply due to sheer volume! In any case, appropriate clothing is usually available at the entrance of churches and monasteries, especially the ones receiving most tourist traffic. Just pick it up going in and drop it off on the way out. Sensitive Topics Do not say that Greece is part of '''Eastern Europe;''' Greece was the only openly pro-Western country in a shore of Communist neighbors, both pro-Soviet and neutral. It is not geographically correct either. Greeks dislike Greece to be labelled as a '''Balkan country''', due to the negative image of the region, even though as the southernmost tip of the Balkan peninsula, Greece lies inside the Balkans. As Greece is part of '''Southern Europe''', it is almost exclusively considered and described by Greeks and foreigners alike as a Southern European country anyway. The '''Macedonian issue''' is considered a very sensitive topic: Greeks consider that the name "Macedonia" is stolen from them and used by Tito's partisans in southern Yugoslavia to address the country created after World War II as a new constituent republic within Yugoslavia by Tito. The Greeks refer to it as "FYRoM" or the "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" when dealing with foreigners and as Skopia (The Greek name of the Macedonian capital Skopje) among themselves. Also, be very careful when talking about '''Ancient Greece''' and the '''Byzantine Empire,''' which are the symbols of their national pride and splendor; however,most will say the polar opposite when talking about the military junta of the late 1960s-mid 1970s. Many Greeks—not just Communists and other left-wing groups—have suffered severe repression and view its leaders with utter resentment. Many Greeks take pride of their '''ancient history''', since '''Ancient Greece''' is a well known civilization to first develop the concept of democracy and western philosophy, as well as its art, architecture, literature, theater and sciences which is regarded as the cradle of European civilization. Likewise, be polite when asking about their relationship with the '''Turks, the Turkish occupation and the Cyprus civil war of 1974,''' as these create passionate, sometimes aggressive, debates, given the past turmoil between the two nations. Relations have improved over recent years though. Rude gestures To "swear" at someone using their hands, Greeks put out their entire hand, palm open, five fingers extended out, like signalling someone to stop. This is called "''mountza''". Sometimes they will do this by saying "na" (''here'') as well. It is basically telling someone to screw off or that they did something totally ridiculous. "''Mountza''" is known to come from a gesture used in the Byzantine era, where the guilty person were applied with ash on his her face by the judge's hand to be ridiculed. Be careful when refusing something in Greece: when refusing the offer of a drink, it's best to put your palm over your glass (or any other refusing gesture that limits the showing of the palm). The ubiquitous middle finger salute will also be understood. There is some regional variation on the use of the 'okay' sign (thumb and index finger in a circle, the 3 other fingers up), as is signalling to a waiter by miming signing a receipt. Smoking Greeks smoke tremendously, and they see cigarettes as a birthright. While smoking is technically prohibited by law in all public places like restaurants and cafeterias since September 2010, however some establishments and most Greeks just ignore this, but nevertheless it is best to follow the smoking ban and either ask if you can light a cigarette or simply see if anybody else is already smoking. Remember that Greece is subject to frequent '''forest fires''' during the dry summer season, so '''definitely avoid''' smoking in forested areas! Connect News You can have an update from various news agencies that provide Greek news in English like the official Athens news agency and Reuters or Kathimerini English Edition (a daily newspaper published in Athens and distributed exclusively with the International New York Times in Greece and Cyprus) but it's always safer to keep in touch with locals (for example in the case of a fire in a nearby location that you planned to visit). Telephone The cheapest way to call someone abroad – and this is really cheap – is to use a pre-paid calling card and call from a land line anywhere (also from your hotel room). Pre-paid calling cards are sold in many shops and kiosks. The calling card is not much more than a phone number and a pin code, which you dial prior to dialling the usual phone number. If you want to call internationally, ask for an ''international'' calling card. For one euro you can call for about 45 minutes, so buy a card in the cheapest value (which is about €3). Calling someone for half an hour is cheaper than sending one email from an internet café. Cards expire usually 90 days after first use. You can also use this pre-paid calling card at public phone boxes, which are widely available. Mobile phones are prevalent in Greek's communication, and if you need to talk with your fellow travellers it is advised that you buy a local prepaid plan instead of using roaming, as it is far cheaper. There are at least three mobile carriers, Cosmote, Wind and Vodafone all of which require by law presenting some form of identification in order to activate your prepaid plan. Choose whichever has better reception in your area, keeping in mind that GSM 900, GSM 1800 and UMTS 2100 bands are supported. Data usage is cheap, costing about €3 per 100 MB. Ask the mobile carrier for more information. Internet Internet access is widely available throughout the country. Almost all hotels provide internet access, either free or paid. Local coffee shops usually offer free Wi-Fi access, as many other public places do. Feel free to ask for the password, if the network is locked. Internet cafes however tend to be expensive, about €1.5-2 per hour. Mobile phone carriers support data roaming with 2G, 3G, 4G and LTE technologies. Commons:Category:Greece Wikipedia:Greece Dmoz:Regional Europe Greece


Boston

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