Southern Tang

939 event2 Became a vassal of Later Zhou date_event2 958 event3 Renamed from "Tang" to "Jiangnan" date_event3 971 event4 date_event4 event_pre date_pre event_post date_post p1 Wu (Ten Kingdoms) s1 Song Dynasty image_flag flag

squabbles. The Southern Tang sent in an army in 951 and removed the ruling family to their own capital in Nanjing, and absorbed the territory. However, Li Jing suffered a setback from the Later Zhou between 956 and 958, and ceded away all of its land north of the Yangtze River. Li Jing became a vassal of the Later Zhou. The Last Ruler Li Yu (Li Houzhu) took over the state upon the death of his father in 961. The Song dynasty had conquered the northern part of the state located

tedious thus not used when referring to this sovereign Li Jing 961-975 (Under Li Yu


Kingdom of Iberia

;ndash;953) **'''Kingdom of Iberia''' - David II (David II of Iberia) (923–937) **'''Principality of Kakheti (Kakheti)''' - Kvirike II (Kvirike II of Kakheti), Prince of Kakheti (List of sovereigns of Kakheti) (929–976) **'''Kingdom of Armenia (Bagratuni Kingdom of Armenia)''' - Abas I (Abas I of Armenia) (928–953) **'''Kingdom of Iberia''' - Sumbat I (Sumbat I of Iberia) (937–958) **'''Principality of Kakheti (Kakheti)''' - Kvirike

II of Kakheti Kvirike II , Prince of Kakheti (List of sovereigns of Kakheti) (929–976) **'''Kingdom of Armenia (Bagratuni Kingdom of Armenia)''' - Abas I (Abas I of Armenia) (928–953) **'''Kingdom of Iberia''' - Sumbat I (Sumbat I of Iberia) (937–958) **'''Principality of Kakheti (Kakheti)''' - Kvirike II (Kvirike II of Kakheti), Prince of Kakheti (List of sovereigns of Kakheti) (929–976) **''' Bagratuni Kingdom of Armenia Kingdom

of Armenia ''' - Abas I (Abas I of Armenia) (928–953) **'''Kingdom of Iberia''' - Sumbat I (Sumbat I of Iberia) (937–958) **'''Principality of Kakheti (Kakheti)''' - Kvirike II (Kvirike II of Kakheti), Prince of Kakheti (List of sovereigns of Kakheti) (929–976) **'''Bagratuni Kingdom of Armenia''' - Gagik I (Gagik I of Armenia) (989–1020) **'''Kingdom of Iberia''' - Bagrat II (Bagrat II of Iberia) (958–994


Duchy of Amalfi

) was a ''de facto'' independent state centred on the Southern Italian (Southern Italy) city of Amalfi during the 10th and 11th centuries. The city and its territory were originally part of the larger ''ducatus Neapolitanus'', governed by a patrician (Patrician (post-Roman Europe)), but it extracted itself from Byzantine (Byzantine Empire) vassalage and first elected a duke (dux) (or doge) in 958. It rose to become an economic powerhouse, a commercial centre whose merchants

-governing republic, still nominally tied to the Byzantine empire, was defeated in a war with Sorrento (Duchy of Sorrento), supported by Naples (Duchy of Naples), in which her prefect was captured, later ransomed. In 914, the prefect Mastalus I (Mastalus I of Amalfi) was appointed first judge. In 958, Mastalus II (Mastalus II of Amalfi) was assassinated and Sergius I (Sergius I of Amalfi) was elected first duke (dux) (or doge). From 981 to 983, Amalfi ruled the Principality


Duchy of Aquitaine

) **#Fulk III (Fulk III, Count of Anjou) (987–1040) **'''Duchy of Aquitaine''' - William IV (William IV, Duke of Aquitaine) (963–995) **'''County of Blois''' - Odo I (Odo I, Count of Blois) (975–995) **'''County of Anjou''' - Geoffrey I (Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou) (958–987) **'''Duchy of Aquitaine''' - William IV (William IV, Duke of Aquitaine) (963–995) **'''County of Blois''' - Odo I (Odo I, Count of Blois) (975

–995) **'''County of Anjou''' - Geoffrey I (Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou) (958–987) **'''Duchy of Aquitaine''' - William IV (William IV, Duke of Aquitaine) (963–995) **'''County of Blois''' - Odo I (Odo I, Count of Blois) (975–995) **'''County of Anjou''' - Geoffrey I (Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou) (958–987) **'''Duchy of Aquitaine''' - William IV (William IV, Duke of Aquitaine) (963–995) **''' County of Blois

''' - Odo I (Odo I, Count of Blois) (975–995) **'''County of Anjou''' - Geoffrey I (Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou) (958–987) **'''Duchy of Aquitaine''' - William IV (William IV, Duke of Aquitaine) (963–995) **'''County of Blois''' - Odo I (Odo I, Count of Blois) (975–995) **'''County of Anjou''' - Geoffrey I (Geoffrey I, Count of Anjou) (958–987) **'''Duchy of Aquitaine''' - William IV, Duke of Aquitaine William IV


Sisak

800–822 Son of Višeslav I. He or his son ruled during the uprisings (819–822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs somewhere in western Bosnia (History of Bosnia and Herzegovina (until 958)) who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)). At this time, there was peace with Bulgaria (First Bulgarian Empire). center>

and Herzegovina (until 958) western Bosnia who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Roman province). http: books.google.se books?id YIAYMNOOe0YC Some Croatian historians (f.e. Nada Klaić) claim that the place Ljudevit fled to was Srb on the mouth of Una (Una (Sava)) (in Lika, Croatia) but other historians dispute this as unfounded. Another array of historians reject the possibility that Ljudevit went to the Serbs at all - but to the actual city

supreme ruler. He was succeeded by his son Radoslav (Radoslav of Serbia), who was the ruler of Serbia during the uprisings (819–822) of Ljudevit Posavski against the Franks. According to the Royal Frankish Annals, in 822, Ljudevit went from his seat in Sisak to the Serbs somewhere in western Bosnia (History of Bosnia and Herzegovina (until 958)) who controlled a great part of Dalmatia (Dalmatia (Roman province)) ("''Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem


Shaoguan

personalities of his time." pg 230, Dumoulin 1994. Chinese (China) Zen master in Tang (Tang Dynasty)-era China. He founded one of the five major schools of Chan (Zen) (Chinese Zen), the "Yunmen school", after succeeding his famous master, Xuefeng Yicun (or Hsueh-feng I-ts'un; another famous disciple of Yicun would be Fa-yen Wen-i (885-958) pg 233


Igbuzo

accessdate 2008-12-18 Some Igbo subgroups, such as the Ikwerre (Ikwerre people), started disassociating themselves with the larger Igbo population after the war. The post-war era saw the changing of names


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