Jingnan

(908–923); Emperor of Later Tang (Table of Chinese monarchs) (923–926) ** ''Jingnan'' – Gao Jixing, Jingnan Jiedushi (907–924); King of Nanping (Jingnan) (924–928) ** '''Nanhai (Southern Han)''' – Liu Yin (Liu Yin (Southern Han)), King of Nanhai (Southern Han) (907–911) **#Li Cunxu, King of Jin (Jin (Five Dynasties)) (908–923); Emperor of Later Tang (Table of Chinese monarchs) (923–926) ** ''Jingnan'' – Gao Jixing, Jingnan Jiedushi (907–924

); King of Nanping (Jingnan) (924–928) ** '''Nanhai (Southern Han)''' – Liu Yin (Liu Yin (Southern Han)), King of Nanhai (Southern Han) (907–911) ** '''Jin (Jin (Five Dynasties))''' – Li Cunxu, King of Jin (Jin (Five Dynasties)) (908–923); Emperor of Later Tang (Table of Chinese monarchs) (923–926) ** ''Jingnan'' – Gao Jixing, Jingnan Jiedushi (907–924); King of Nanping (Jingnan) (924–928) ** '''Min (Min (Ten Kingdoms))''' – Wang Shenzhi, Min (Ten Kingdoms

) King of Min (909–925) ** '''Jin (Jin (Five Dynasties))''' – Li Cunxu, King of Jin (Jin (Five Dynasties)) (908–923); Emperor of Later Tang (Table of Chinese monarchs) (923–926) ** ''Jingnan'' – Gao Jixing, Jingnan Jiedushi (907–924); King of Nanping (Jingnan) (924–928) ** '''Min (Min (Ten Kingdoms))''' – Wang Shenzhi, King of Min (Min (Ten Kingdoms)) (909–925) ** '''Jin (Jin (Five Dynasties))''' – Li Cunxu, King of Jin (Jin (Five Dynasties)) (908–923


Liao dynasty

common_languages Khitan (Khitan language), Middle Chinese religion Buddhism Influences from: Taoism Zodiac (Chinese zodiac) Zoroastrianism currency leader1 Taizu (Abaoji) (Emperor Taizu of Liao) year_leader1 907–926 leader2

Taizong (Emperor Taizong of Liao) year_leader2 926–947 leader3 Shizong (Emperor Shizong of Liao) year_leader3 947–951 leader4 Muzong (Emperor Muzong of Liao) year_leader4 951–969 leader5 Jingzong (Emperor Jingzong of Liao) year_leader5 969–982 leader6 Shengzong (Emperor Shengzong of Liao) year_leader6 982–1031 leader7 Emperor

to the model of governance used by the Chinese dynasties. He assumed the title of Celestial Emperor and designated an era name (Chinese era name), named his oldest son Yelü Bei as his successor, and commissioned the construction of a Confucian temple. Two years later he established a capital city, Shangjing (上京), which imitated the model of a Chinese capital city. Mote (1999), 41. and Wittfogel and Feng (1946), 401. Before his death in 926, Abaoji greatly expanded


Mudanjiang

University,Dalian,Liaoning,116029,China) year 2006 accessdate 2012-08-18 During Tang Dynasty, Balhae established their permanent capital Sanggyeong near Lake Jingpo in the south of today's Mudanjiang city around 755 AD. On January 14, 926, Sanggyeong was fallen while Balhae was defeated by the Khitans. http

to Lushunkou, Liaoning Province. It is 1,964 kilometres in length and runs southeast from Hegang towards the border with Russia before turning southwest, going via Mudanjiang, Heilongjiang Province and Dandong, Liaoning Province. After conquering the Dan Gur (Balhae in Khitan language) in 926, the Khitan crown prince Yelü Bei (Prince Bei) ascended to the throne of it at the Holhan fortress, the capital of Balhae, today's Mudanjiang, Heilongjiang Province


West Vancouver

Depot, Old Navy, Whole Foods. Eat * *

exit 10 on the Trans-Canada highway en-route to Whistler. * *

address 2229 Folkestone Way lat long directions Exit #10 off Hwy #1 in West Vancouver phone +1 604-926-3212 tollfree fax hours price Mains $25-$35, appetizers $8-$15 (the restaurant will also offer periodic specials where you can get a three course dinner for $30-$35, it's usually advertised in local papers) content Set on a hill overlooking the entrance to Vancouver harbour, you can enjoy both your food and your view while you eat. Salmon (in various styles


Primorsky Krai

, Zabaykalsky Krai Chita . The Far Eastern Republic occupied the territory of modern Zabaykalsky Krai, Amur Oblast, Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Khabarovsk Krai, and Primorsky Krai of Russia (the former Transbaikal (Transbaikal oblast) and Amur (Amur Oblast) oblasts and Primorsky (Primorsky Krai) krai). Initially, its capital was Verkhneudinsk (now Ulan-Ude), but from October 1920 it was moved to Chita (Chita, Zabaykalsky Krai). Balhae Balhae (698–926

) and Primorsky Krai, and the northern part of the Korean peninsula. It was defeated by the Khitans (Khitan people) in 926, and most of its northern territories were absorbed into the Liao Dynasty while the southern parts were absorbed into Goryeo. The tenth King Seon (Seon of Balhae) reign (r. 818-830), Balhae controlled northern Korea, Northeastern Manchuria and now Primorsky Krai of Russia. King Seon led campaigns that resulted in the absorbing of many northern Mohe

-Rybolov''' ( From 698 to 926, the kingdom of Balhae occupied


Goryeo

as a successor state to Goguryeo. During its height, Balhae controlled most of Manchuria and parts of Russian Far East. It fell to the Khitan (History of the Khitans) in 926. The peninsula was united by Emperor Taejo (Taejo of Goryeo) of Goryeo in 936. Like Silla, Goryeo was a highly cultural state and created the Jikji in 1377, using the world's oldest movable metal type printing press.

, poetry and art was encouraged, and Buddhist culture thrived. Relationships between Korea and China remained relatively peaceful during this time. However, Unified Silla weakened under internal strife, and surrendered to Goryeo in 935. Balhae, Silla's neighbor to the north, was formed as a successor state to Goguryeo. During its height, Balhae controlled most of Manchuria and parts of Russian Far East. It fell to the Khitan (History of the Khitans) in 926. The peninsula was united

to Suwon in 1413. Eventually, Balhae would succumb to the Khitans, an emerging power in the Liaoxi area (east of the current Beijing area). After destroying Balhae in 926, the Khitan established the puppet Dongdan Kingdom, which was soon annexed


Nin, Croatia

Assembly in 926, according to traditional Croatian historiography. Until that time, services were held only in Latin (Latin language), not being understandable to the majority of the population. Not only was this important for Croatian language and culture but it also made the religion stronger within the Croatian kingdom (Kingdom of Croatia (Medieval)). Dragutin Pavličević, Povijest Hrvatske, naklada Pavičić, Zagreb 2007. godine, ISBN 978-953-6308-71-2 The statue


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017