Ostrogothic Kingdom

to him. Justinian indeed sent an able agent of his, Peter of Thessalonica (Peter the Patrician), to carry out the negotiations, but before he had even crossed into Italy, Athalaric had died (on 2 October 534), Amalasuntha had crowned Theodahad as king in an effort to secure his support, and he had deposed and imprisoned her. Theodahad, who was of a peaceful disposition, immediately sent envoys to announce his ascension to Justinian and to reassure him of Amalasuntha's safety. Bury (1923

of the Ostrogothic Kingdom *Theoderic the Great (''Thiudoric'') 489-526 *Athalaric (''Atthalaric'') 526-534 *Theodahad (''Thiudahad'') 534-536 *Witiges (''Wittigeis'') 536-540 *Ildibad (''Hildibad'') 540-541 *Eraric the Rugian (Eraric) (''Heraric'', ''Ariaric'') 541 *Totila (''Baduila'') 541-552 *Teia (''Theia'', ''Teja'') 552-553 Cultural Architecture File:Palazzo.jpg thumb 300px The Palace of Theoderic

. **Theuderic I, King of Rheims (List of Frankish Kings) (511–534) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Athalaric (526–534) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - Theudis (531–548) **Theuderic I, King of Rheims (List of Frankish Kings) (511–534) *'''Ostrogothic Kingdom''' - Athalaric (526–534) *'''Visigothic Kingdom''' - **Theuderic I, King of Rheims (List of Frankish Kings) (511–534) *''' Ostrogothic Kingdom


Northern Qi

frontier, changed hands many times, being controlled at various points in history by the Later Zhao, Former Yan, Former Qin, and Later Yan. The Northern Wei reunified northern China in 440, but split in half in 534, with Hebei coming under the eastern half (first the Eastern Wei; then the Northern Qi), which had its capital at Ye (鄴), near modern Linzhang, Hebei. The Sui Dynasty again unified China in 589. -align "center" Northern Qi Ye

his own puppet ruler to maintain authority. As conflict swelled in the north between successive leaders, Gao Huan took control of the east and Luoyang (holding Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei as a puppet ruler) by 534, while his rival Yuwen Tai took control of the west and the traditional Chinese capital of Chang'an by 535. Eventually, Gao Huan's son Gao Yang forced the Eastern Wei emperor to abdicate in favor of his claim to the throne, establishing the Northern Qi

Yang forced Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei to yield the throne to him, ending Eastern Wei and establishing the Northern Qi. Similarly, in 557, Yuwen Tai's nephew Yuwen Hu forced Emperor Gong of Western Wei to yield the throne to Yuwen Tai's son Yuwen Jue (Emperor Xiaomin of Northern Zhou), ending the Western Wei and establishing the Northern Zhou, finally extinguishing Northern Wei's imperial rule. In 534, the Northern Wei split into an Eastern Wei (534-550


Northern Wei

Shengle (386-398, capital of former Dai (Dai (Sixteen Kingdoms)), near modern Huhhot) Pingcheng (Datong) (398-493) Luoyang (493-534) Chang'an (534-535) capital_exile latd latm latNS longd longm longEW national_motto national_anthem

魏 p Běi Wèi ), also known as the '''Tuoba Wei''' (拓跋魏), '''Later Wei''' (後魏), or '''Yuan Wei''' (元魏), was a dynasty founded by the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei, which ruled northern China from 386 to 534 (''de jure'' until 535). Described as "part of an era of political turbulence and intense social and cultural change", Katherine R. Tsiang, p. 222 the Northern Wei Dynasty is particularly noted for unifying northern China in 439: this was also a period

from the Northern Wei period, build in the early 6th century. Breakup and division thumb left 250px Stone Statue in front of tomb. Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534 CE)in the Luoyang Museum (File:Stone Statue in front of tomb. Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534 CE).jpg) The heavy Chinese influence that had come into the Northern Wei state which went on throughout the 5th century had mainly affected the courts and the upper ranks of the Tuoba aristocracy. ref name "ReferenceA


Northern Zhou

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of their administrative organization was very similar to the previous Southern and Northern Dynasties. The Northern Zhou (557–581) divisional militia (fubing (Fubing system)) was continued by the Tang government, along with farmer-soldiers serving in rotation from the capital or frontier in order to receive appropriated farmland. The equal-field system of the Northern Wei Dynasty (Northern Wei) (386–534) was also kept, although there were a few

Yuwen Jue (Emperor Xiaomin of Northern Zhou) Yuwen Yan (Emperor Jing of Northern Zhou) 557 AD 581 AD - The Northern Dynasties thumb right Northern Zhou (Image:Northern Zhou stele.PNG) Daoist stele made of limestone. In the first half of the Northern Wei Dynasty (386–534 AD), the Xianbei steppe tribesmen who dominated northern China kept a policy of strict social distinction between them and their Chinese subjects


Western Yan

(1124–1218). The Shiwei tribe, like the Tuoba, were originally located to the north of the Murong and Khitan. While the Tuoba migrated south and established the State of Dai (310-376) and Northern Wei dynasty (386-534) the Shiwei remained in the north but eventually paid tribute to the Northern Wei (for example the Wuluohu sub-tribe started paying tribute in 444). Known also as the Tatars the Shiwei would later establish the Khamag Mongol Khanate (Khamag Mongol) (1125–1206), the Mongol

History 鮮卑史論. Taibei 台北 , Nan tian shu ju Nantian Press 南天書局. Wang, Zhongluo 王仲荦 (2007). Wei jin nan bei chao shi History of Wei, Jin, Southern and Northern Dynasties 魏晋南北朝史. Beijing 北京 , Zhonghua shu ju China Press 中华书局. In 534, the Northern Wei split into an Eastern Wei (534-550) and a Western Wei (535-556). The former evolved into the Northern Qi (550-577), and the latter into the Northern Zhou (557-581), while the Southern


Wuhan

;"

x 675 y 1220 scale 534 1780 text '''4''' (Hanyang District)

: black;" '''Hongshan'''


Merrill, Wisconsin

region:US_type:city latd 45 latm 10 lats 57 latNS N longd 89 longm 41 longs 44 longEW W elevation_m 401 elevation_ft 1316 postal_code_type Zipcode postal_code 54452 area_code 715 & 534 (Area codes 715 and 534) website www.ci.merrill.wi.us footnotes '''Merrill''' is a city in and the county seat of Lincoln County (Lincoln County, Wisconsin), Wisconsin


Southern Yan

bei chao shi History of Wei, Jin, Southern and Northern Dynasties 魏晋南北朝史. Beijing 北京 , Zhonghua shu ju China Press 中华书局. In 534, the Northern Wei split into an Eastern Wei (534-550) and a Western Wei (535-556). The former evolved into the Northern Qi (550-577), and the latter into the Northern Zhou (557-581), while the Southern Dynasties were pushed to the south of the Yangtze River. In 581, the Prime Minister of Northern Zhou, Emperor Wen of Sui Yang


Later Yan

of the Western Jin Dynasty, the chaos of the Sixteen Kingdoms and the Northern and Southern Dynasties ensued. Hebei, firmly in North China and right at the northern frontier, changed hands many times, being controlled at various points in history by the Later Zhao, Former Yan, Former Qin, and Later Yan. The Northern Wei reunified northern China in 440, but split in half in 534, with Hebei coming under the eastern half (first the Eastern Wei

Shanxi. They were followed by Northern Wei (Northern Wei Dynasty) (386 - 534), a Xianbei kingdom, which had one of its earlier capitals at present-day Datong in northern Shanxi, and which went on to rule nearly all of northern China. Initially Northern Wei was a vassal of Later Yan, but by 395 had rebelled and by 398 had conquered most of Later Yan territory north of the Yellow River. In 399 Tuoba Gui he declared himself Emperor Daowu, and that title was used by Northern

). The Shiwei tribe, like the Tuoba, were originally located to the north of the Murong and Khitan. While the Tuoba migrated south and established the State of Dai (310-376) and Northern Wei dynasty (386-534) the Shiwei remained in the north but eventually paid tribute to the Northern Wei (for example the Wuluohu sub-tribe started paying tribute in 444). Known also as the Tatars the Shiwei would later establish the Khamag Mongol Khanate (Khamag Mongol) (1125–1206), the Mongol Empire (1206


Francia

to create equal-sized fiscs. The discrepancy in size reveals the concentration of Roman fiscal lands. Clovis's sons made their capitals near the Frankish heartland in northeastern Gaul. Theuderic I made his capital at Reims, Chlodomer at Orléans, Childebert I at Paris, and Chlothar I at Soissons. During their reigns, the Thuringii (532), Burgundes (534), and Saxons and Frisians (c. 560) were incorporated into the Frankish kingdom. The outlying trans

intermittent signs of friendship and were often in rivalry. On the early death of Chlodomer, his brother Chlothar had his young sons murdered in order to take a share of his kingdom, which was, in accordance with custom, divided between the surviving brothers. Theuderic died in 534, but his adult son Theudebert I was capable of defending his inheritance, which formed the largest of the Frankish subkingdoms and the kernel of the later kingdom of Austrasia. Theudebert was the first Frankish king

heavy plough and the growing use of the three-field system. Currency Byzantine coinage was in use in Francia before Theudebert I began minting his own money at the start of his reign. The solidus (solidus (coin)) and triens were minted in Francia between 534 and 679. The denarius (or denier (French denier)) appeared later, in the name of Childeric II and various non-royals around 673–675. A Carolingian denarius replaced the Merovingian one, and the Frisian


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