Ston

, the ban of Bosnia, who then annexed most of Hum. Fine 1994, p. 266 Ston and Pelješac were officially handed over to the Ragusans in 1333. Blagojević 2001, p. 20: "Поуздано се зна да је приликом уступања Стона и Пељешца Дубровчанима 1333. године био присутан и казнац Балдовин. 20 " Vukosav Nikolić was buried in Ston after his death in the Bosnian-Ragusan War (1403). Ston is also known for its saltworks which were run by the Republic

Milutin took one of Mladen's brother captive, and to get him back Mladen Šubić had to agree to restore a part of Hum to Milutin. After this agreement in 1313 the Neretva again became the border between eastern and western Hum. By 1325, the Branivojević family had emerged as strongest in Hum. Fine (The Late Medieval Balkans – 1994), pp. 266. Probably

at their highest point they ruled from Cetina River to the town of Kotor. Though nominal vassals of Serbia, the Branivojević family attacked Serbian interests and other local nobles of Hum, who in 1526 turned against Serbia and Branivojević family. The Hum nobles approached to Stjepan Kotromanić II (Stephen II, Ban of Bosnia), the ban of Bosnia, who then annexed most of Hum. ref name "Fine 266" >


Omiš

of Croatia County subdivision_name1 Split-Dalmatia County subdivision_type3 subdivision_name3 subdivision_type4 subdivision_name4 government_footnotes government_type leader_title leader_name established_title established_date area_magnitude unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_total_km2 266 area_land_km2 population_as_of

( . Name It is supposed that the name of this city, ''Omiš'', developed from the Slavic ''Holm'', ''Hum'' as a translation from the Illyrian (Illyrian language) - Greek (Greek language) word ''Onaion'', ''Oneon'', meaning "hill" or "place on the hill", but there is also the possibility that the name


New Finland, Saskatchewan

an area which was still wooded and had historically escaped the many grass fires which blanketed the great plains. The homesteaders found an area which resembled the homeland both in geography and climate.


Kotor

(The Early Medieval Balkans – 1991), p. 258. By 1325, the Branivojević family had emerged as strongest in Hum. Fine (The Late Medieval Balkans – 1994), pp. 266. Probably at their highest point they ruled from Cetina River to the town of Kotor. Though nominal vassals of Serbia, the Branivojević family attacked Serbian interests and other local nobles of Hum, who in 1526 turned

against Serbia and Branivojević family. The Hum nobles approached to Stjepan Kotromanić II (Stephen II, Ban of Bosnia), the ban of Bosnia, who then annexed most of Hum. The Draživojevići of Nevesinje as vassals of Bosnian Ban, become the leading family of Hum in 1330s. Fine (The Late Medieval Balkans – 1994), pp. 267. Because of the war in 1327-1328 between


Makhachkala

Squadron RAF No. 221 Squadron Royal Air Force based themselves at Petrovsk. In March they were joined by No. 266 Squadron (No. 266 Squadron RAF) and both squadrons were involved in bombing operations against Bolshevik forces in Astrakhan and elsewhere. In August 1919 both squadrons were withdrawn from Petrovsk. ref


Phitsanulok

was at that time seventy two years of age, while his opponent was only thirty nine. Any doubt about Azaewunky's stratagem to sow discord between King Taksin and Chao Phraya Chakri should be dismissed, since they collaborated closely in subsequent military expeditions. W.A.R.Wood, pp. 265-266 Damrong Rajanubhab, pp. 493-495 *Nonthaburi: Probably comes from '''Nuanwulifu''' in Chinese (


Shaizar

defenses, the river protects it on one side and the city on the other, so that it is entirely inaccessible." William of Tyre, ''A History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea'', trans. E.A. Babcock and A.C. Krey, Columbia University Press, 1943, bk. 18, ch. 18, pp. 266-267. Fulcher of Chartres, an eyewitness to the siege in 1111, did not know the classical Roman or Greek name for the site, and noted that the Turks called it "Sisara", "


Tequila, Jalisco

drink. After the Spanish arrived, they took this fermented beverage and distilled it, producing the tequila known today. The popularity of the drink and the history behind it has made the town and the area surrounding it a World Heritage Site.


Perm Krai

(Perm Krai) Vishera River — 415 km (258 mi) *Yayva River — 403 km (250 mi) *Kosva River — 283 km (176 mi) *Kosa River — 267 km (165 mi) *Veslyana River — 266 km (165 mi) *Inva River — 257 km (159 mi) *Obva River — 247 km (153 mi) There are also many small rivers, but some of them have historical significance, for example Yegoshikha River

24,651 366 455 14.85 18.46 -0.36% ---- Permsky 87,342 1,275 1,383 14.60 15.83 -0.12% ---- Sivinsky 16,797 297 266 17.68 15.84 0.18% ---- Solikamsky 17,637 203 265 11.51 15.03 -0.35% ---- Suksunsky 20,925 294 349 14.05 16.68 -0.26% ---- Uynsky 12,631 180 212 14.25 16.78 -0.25% ---- Usolsky 13,788 176 299 12.76 21.69 -0.88% ---- Chastinsky 14,450 207 254 14.33 17.58 -0.33% ---- Cherdynsky 32,522 342 542 10.52 16.67 -0.61


Bilhorod-Dnistrovskyi

was returned ownership of Brăila, Giurgiu (both of which soon developed into major trading cities on the Danube), and Turnu Măgurele. Giurescu, p.122, 127 The treaty also allowed Moldavia and Wallachia to freely trade with countries other than the Ottoman Empire, which signalled substantial economic and urban growth, as well as improving the peasant situation. Djuvara, p.262, 324; Giurescu, p.127, 266 Many of the provisions had been


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