Places Known For

traditional influence


Gao

is the tindé drum which is played by women at festive occasions. Another important traditional influence is the lute known as the teherdent, which is played by the griots of the Gao and Timbuktu regions. In the late 1970s, when the founding members of Tinariwen started playing acoustic guitars, they played a traditional repertoire adapted to the western guitar.


French Fifth Republic

by giving leave to students for important holidays of their specific religions, and food menus served in secondary schools (Education in France) pay particular attention to ensuring that each religious observer may respect his religion's specific restrictions concerning diets. To counter the traditional influence of Christian festivals educationalists in line with market forces have often promoted references to Santa Claus, Valentines and Halloween, particularly at primary school level. - 1959


Timbuktu

at festive occasions. Another important traditional influence is the lute known as the teherdent, which is played by the griots of the Gao and Timbuktu regions. In the late 1970s, when the founding members of Tinariwen started playing acoustic guitars, they played a traditional repertoire adapted to the western guitar. *Tongchuan (Tongchuan, Shaanxi) (China) — Licantén (Chile) *Suva (Fiji) — Timbuktu (Mali) *Jaisalmer (India)— Easter Island Commons:Category:Timbuktu WikiPedia:Timbuktu


Hebron

masonry is that dating from the time of Herod the Great, in the tower of David and the walls of the ''Haram'' in Jerusalem, and at Hebron. In the castles built by the Crusaders (Crusader states), the adze has been worked in a diagonal direction instead of vertically. In all these examples the size of the stones employed is sometimes enormous, so that the traditional influence of the Phoenician stonemasons seems to have lasted till the 12th century. Upon his return to Israel, the Rabash continued to study and to teach. He did not want to become publicly known as a Kabbalist; hence, as did his father, he declined any offers for official posts. After the end of the 1960s, he changed his ways and began teaching Kabbalah in broader circles. He would travel to wherever there was even the smallest demand to hear about Kabbalah. Among the cities he frequented were Hebron, Tiberias, and Jerusalem. Rabbi Abraham M. Gotlieb, Ha Sulam, p. 260; F. Ashlag, A Prayer of a Kabbalist, p. 10 In 1976, he expanded his seminary, and his humble home in Bnei Brak became a spacious synagogue. He himself moved to the second floor of the building. Rabbi Abraham M. Gotlieb, Ha Sulam, p. 260 He would occasionally travel to Tiberias for purposes of seclusion. * Israel's migration * Hanoch, Phallu Pallu (List of minor Biblical figures), Hezron, Carmi, Jemuel, Jamin, Ohad, Boaz and Jachin, Zohar, Shaul, Libni, Shimi, Kohath, Amram, Izhar, Korah (again), Assir, Elkanah (husband of Hannah), Putiel, Phinehas, Nepheg, Zichri, Hebron, Elzaphan, Naashon, WikiPedia:Hebron


Jerusalem

, in the tower of David and the walls of the ''Haram'' in Jerusalem, and at Hebron. In the castles built by the Crusaders (Crusader states), the adze has been worked in a diagonal direction instead of vertically. In all these examples the size of the stones employed is sometimes enormous, so that the traditional influence of the Phoenician stonemasons seems to have lasted till the 12th century. Dosetai b. Jannai Tanna of the latter half of the 2nd century, known especially as having handed down sentences of the tannaim Meïr, Jose b. Ḥalafta, and Eleazer ben Shammua. On a journey to Babylon he was ill-treated at Nehardea by the Jewish-Persian (Persian Jews) authorities, and took revenge by giving a satirical description of the latter. The account of the affair is preserved in two different versions (Giṭ. 14a, b; Yer. Giṭ. i. 43d; Yer. Ḳid. iii. 64a). Examples of Dosetai's humor are to be found in his answers to his pupils' questions on the differences between man and woman (Niddah 31b), and in his reply to the question why Jerusalem did not have thermæ like Tiberias: "If Jerusalem had warm springs," he answered, "the pilgrims coming up for the feasts would have dwelt on the pleasures of the baths offered them, instead of considering how best to fulfil the regulations for the pilgrimage" (Pes. 8b). The words of Eccl. xi. 6 ("In the morning sow thy seed," etc.) he explained as a reminder to the farmer to be diligent in his sowing and planting (Ab. R. N. iii.). In another sentence (ib. xi.) he showed how the person who does not work during the six week-days will soon find himself compelled to work on the Sabbath (Shabbat). One of Dosetai's sermons praises almsgiving, interpreting Ps. xvii. 15 thus: "Through charity (Charity (virtue)) shall I see thy face, and enjoy thy sight on awakening" (B. B. 10a). Commons:Category:Jerusalem Wikipedia:Jerusalem Dmoz:Regional Middle East Israel Localities Jerusalem


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017