Places Known For

speaking white


Namibia

, ''Anglo-South African'' is used for predominantly British-descended, English-speaking white people, who are contrasted with the Dutch (Dutch people)-descended Afrikaners. Use of ''Anglo'' occurs elsewhere in former British colonies (British Empire) in Africa which have sizeable British communities, including Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. However, the term "Anglo" is more heavily used in South Africa than

the white voters of South West Africa, now Namibia, on the electoral roll. Afrikaners, who were more likely to favour a republic than English-speaking white South Africans, were also on average younger than them, with a higher birth rate. Similarly in South West Africa, the Afrikaners and German (German language)-speaking whites outnumbered English-speaking members. '''Bushmanland''' (Boesmanland in Afrikaans) is a name applied to two different territories; one in Namibia and one


Providence, Rhode Island

Little Italies were, to a considerable extent, the product of Italophobia (Anti-Italianism) by the English-speaking, WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant) society. Ethnocentrism and anti-Catholicism by Protestant English-speakers helped to create an ideological foundation for fixing foreignness on urban spaces occupied by immigrants, who seemed racially different from the earlier Anglo-Celtic and northern European settlers. Donna R. Gabaccia, "Global Geography of 'Little Italy


Madagascar

the White and slave unions were absorbed into the local proto-Afrikaans speaking White population. With this additional labour, the areas occupied by the VOC expanded further to the north and east, with inevitable clashes with the Khoikhoi. The newcomers drove the Khoikhoi from their traditional lands, decimated them with introduced diseases, and destroyed them with superior weapons when they fought back, which they did in a number of major wars and with guerrilla warfare guerrilla


Zimbabwe

an ultimatum (British Ultimatum) demanding that the Portuguese withdraw from the disputed area. is used for predominantly British-descended, English-speaking white people, who are contrasted with the Dutch (Dutch people)-descended Afrikaners. Use of ''Anglo'' occurs elsewhere in former British colonies (British Empire) in Africa which have sizeable British communities, including Namibia


Kansas City, Missouri

Little Italies were, to a considerable extent, the product of Italophobia (Anti-Italianism) by the English-speaking, WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant) society. Ethnocentrism and anti-Catholicism by Protestant English-speakers helped to create an ideological foundation for fixing foreignness on urban spaces occupied by immigrants, who seemed racially different from the earlier Anglo-Celtic and northern European settlers. Donna R. Gabaccia, "Global Geography of 'Little Italy


Baltimore

were, to a considerable extent, the product of Italophobia (Anti-Italianism) by the English-speaking, WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant) society. Ethnocentrism and anti-Catholicism by Protestant English-speakers helped to create an ideological foundation for fixing foreignness on urban spaces occupied by immigrants, who seemed racially different from the earlier Anglo-Celtic and northern European settlers. Donna R. Gabaccia, "Global Geography of 'Little Italy': Italian


Pittsburgh

of Italophobia (Anti-Italianism) by the English-speaking, WASP (White Anglo-Saxon Protestant) society. Ethnocentrism and anti-Catholicism by Protestant English-speakers helped to create an ideological foundation for fixing foreignness on urban spaces occupied by immigrants, who seemed racially different from the earlier Anglo-Celtic and northern European settlers. Donna R. Gabaccia, "Global Geography of 'Little Italy': Italian Neighbourhoods in Comparative Perspective", ''Modern


Kenya

In South Africa, ''Anglo-South African'' is used for predominantly British-descended, English-speaking white people, who are contrasted with the Dutch (Dutch people)-descended Afrikaners. Use of ''Anglo'' occurs elsewhere in former British colonies (British Empire) in Africa which have sizeable British communities, including Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. However, the term "Anglo" is more heavily used in South


Indonesia

into the local proto-Afrikaans speaking White population. With this additional labour, the areas occupied by the VOC expanded further to the north and east, with inevitable clashes with the Khoikhoi. The newcomers drove the Khoikhoi from their traditional lands, decimated them with introduced diseases, and destroyed them with superior weapons when they fought back, which they did in a number of major wars and with guerrilla (guerrilla warfare) resistance movements that continued into the 19th century. Most survivors were left with no option but to work for the Europeans in an exploitative arrangement that differed little from slavery. Over time, the Khoisan, their European overseers, and the imported slaves mixed, with the offspring of these unions forming the basis for today's Coloured population. Dmoz:Regional Asia Indonesia Commons:Category:Indonesia Wikipedia:Indonesia


South Africa

British-descended, English-speaking white people, who are contrasted with the Dutch (Dutch people)-descended Afrikaners. Use of ''Anglo'' occurs elsewhere in former British colonies (British Empire) in Africa which have sizeable British communities, including Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. However, the term "Anglo" is more heavily used in South Africa than in these other countries because of the need to distinguish between two sizable yet distinct

government as a university for Coloured people only. Other universities near Cape Town are the University of Cape Town, (UCT, originally for English speaking whites (White (people))) and the Stellenbosch University (originally for Afrikaans speaking (Afrikaans) whites). The establishing of UWC was a direct effect of the Separate University Education Bill of 1957. This law accomplished the segregation of higher education in South Africa. Coloured students were only allowed


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