Places Known For

small culture


Cuernavaca

Category:Municipalities of Morelos left thumb A 1628 relief map of Acapulco bay (File:Puerto de Acapulco Boot 1628.png) By the eighth century, there was a small culture in the Acapulco area, which would first be dominated by the Olmecs, then by a number of others during the pre-Hispanic period. In Acapulco bay itself, there were two Olmec sites, one by Playa Larga and the other on a hill known as El Guitarrón. Olmec influence caused the small spread-out villages here to coalesce into larger entities and build ceremonial centers. Later, Teotihuacan influence made its way here via Cuernavaca and Chilpancingo. Then Mayan (Maya civilization) influence arrived from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and through what is now Oaxaca. This history is known through the archeological artifacts that have been found here, especially at Playa Hornos, Pie de la Cuesta and Tambuco. In the 11th century, new waves of migration of Nahuas (Nahua peoples) and Coixas came through here. These people were the antecedents of the Aztecs. Acapulco formally became part of the Aztec Empire in 1486 during the reign of Ahuizotl. It was part of a tributary province called Tepecuacuilco, but control here was relatively unorganized. Mingus did not complete his final project of an album named after him (Mingus (album)) with singer Joni Mitchell, which included lyrics added by Mitchell to Mingus compositions, including "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat", among Mitchell originals and short, spoken word duets and home recordings of Mitchell and Mingus. The album featured the talents of Wayne Shorter, Herbie Hancock, and another influential bassist and composer, Jaco Pastorius. Mingus died aged 56 in Cuernavaca, Mexico, where he had traveled for treatment and convalescence. His ashes were scattered in the Ganges River. DATE OF DEATH 1979-01-05 PLACE OF DEATH Cuernavaca, Mexico thumb left 150px Francisco León de la Barra (Image:Francisco Leon de la Barra.jpg) (1863–1939), whose interim presidency in 1911 gave Madero's enemies time to organize. Madero now called for the disbanding of all revolutionary forces, arguing that the revolutionaries should henceforth proceed solely by peaceful means. In the south, revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata was skeptical about disbanding his troops, but Madero traveled south to meet with Zapata at Cuernavaca and Cuautla, Morelos. Madero assured Zapata that the land redistribution promised in the Plan of San Luis Potosí would be carried out when Madero became president. After reasserting his position and reestablishing some sort of order, Cortés retired to his estates at Cuernavaca, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Mexico City. There he concentrated on the building of his palace and on Pacific exploration. Remaining in Mexico between 1530 and 1541, Cortés quarreled with Nuño Beltrán de Guzmán and disputed the right to explore the territory that is today California with Antonio de Mendoza, the first viceroy. In 1536, Cortés explored the northwestern part of Mexico and discovered the Baja California peninsula. Cortés also spent time exploring the Pacific coast of Mexico. The Gulf of California was originally named the ''Sea of Cortes'' by its discoverer Francisco de Ulloa in 1539. This was the last major expedition by Cortés. *''doña'' Catalina Cortés de Zúñiga, born in Cuernavaca in 1531 and died shortly after her birth. *''don'' Martín Cortés (Martín Cortés, 2nd Marqués del Valle de Oaxaca) y Ramírez de Arellano, 2nd Marquis of the Valley of Oaxaca, born in Cuernavaca in 1532, married at Nalda on February 24, 1548 his twice cousin once removed ''doña'' Ana Ramírez de Arellano y Ramírez de Arellano and had issue, currently extinct in male line *''doña'' María Cortés de Zúñiga, born in Cuernavaca between 1533 and 1536, married to ''don'' Luis de Quiñones y Pimentel, 5th Count of Luna *''doña'' María Cortés de Zúñiga, born in Cuernavaca between 1533 and 1536, married to ''don'' Luis de Quiñones y Pimentel, 5th Count of Luna *''doña'' Catalina Cortés de Zúñiga, born in Cuernavaca between 1533 and 1536, died unmarried in Sevilla after the funeral of her father *''doña'' Juana Cortés de Zúñiga, born in Cuernavaca between 1533 and 1536, married Don (Don (honorific)) Fernando Enríquez de Ribera y Portocarrero, 2nd Duke of Alcalá de los Gazules, 3rd Marquess of Tarifa and 6th Count of Los Molares, and had issue *''doña'' Catalina Cortés de Zúñiga, born in Cuernavaca between 1533 and 1536, died unmarried in Sevilla after the funeral of her father *''doña'' Juana Cortés de Zúñiga, born in Cuernavaca between 1533 and 1536, married Don (Don (honorific)) Fernando Enríquez de Ribera y Portocarrero, 2nd Duke of Alcalá de los Gazules, 3rd Marquess of Tarifa and 6th Count of Los Molares, and had issue Mexico City is served by Mexico City International Airport (IATA Airport Code (International Air Transport Association airport code): MEX). This airport is Latin America's busiest and largest in traffic, with daily flights to United States and Canadá , mainland Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, South America, Europe and Asia. Aeroméxico (Skyteam (SkyTeam)) and Mexicana (Mexicana de Aviación) (Oneworld) are based at this airport, and provide codeshare agreements with non-Mexican airlines that span the entire globe. It is used by over 26 million passengers per year. Aeropuertos Mexico WikiPedia:Cuernavaca Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Morelos Localities Cuernavaca Commons:Category:Cuernavaca


Acapulco

(1806–1872). The seal for the city shows broken reeds or cane. History left thumb A 1628 relief atlas of Acapulco bay (File:Puerto de Acapulco Boot 1628.png) By the eighth century in the Acapulco area, there was a small culture which would first be dominated by the Olmecs, then by a number of others during the pre-Hispanic period. In Acapulco bay itself, there were two Olmec sites, one by Playa Larga and the other on a hill known as El


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