Places Known For

political character


Varberg

in many National and International vintage racing events with great success. In September 2001, the Swedish king Carl XVI Gustaf was visiting Varberg when he suddenly got pied by a 16-year old boy. Such an attack could possibly have counted as high treason under Swedish law, which would have warranted a long prison sentence. However, the perpetrator was merely convicted for assault as it could not be proven that his motive was of political character. He was therefore sentenced to no more than hefty day-fines (day-fine). Two other boys, who had helped to prepare the attack by making the cake, were also fined. http: www.aftonbladet.se nyheter article10246204.ab During a visit to Varberg Varberg, Halland A 16-year old boy The band is mostly known for their energetic live performances. They have done numerous festival gigs and have also toured together with The Soundtrack of Our Lives. Lead singer Simon Ohlsson is usually very wild and erratic on stage and several performances have gone awry. For example, early in the band's career, a gig in Varberg ended with Simon being dragged away by police who thought he was on drugs (it is said that he had only had one beer); and at Rookiefestivalen 2004 he jumped out into the sparse crowd and was thrown out from the venue by a security guard, while the rest of the band kept playing. - '''41 (Swedish national road 41)''' Varberg Borås align "right" 83 km - birth_date WikiPedia:Varberg Dmoz:Regional Europe Sweden Halland County Localities Varberg


Zeila

Zeila, finally capturing the city and killing Sultan Sa'ad ad-Din. Early Islamic States in Western Somaliland With the introduction of Islam in the 7th century in what are now the Afar (Afar people)-inhabited parts of Eritrea and Djibouti, the region began to assume a political character independent of Ethiopia. Three Islamic sultanates were founded in and around the area named Shewa (a Semitic-speaking sultanate in eastern Ethiopia, modern Shewa province and ruled by the Mahzumi dynasty, related to Muslim Amhara (Amhara people)s and Argobbas), Ifat (Kingdom of Ifat) (another Semitic-speaking Pankhurst, Richard. ''The Ethiopian Borderlands: Essays in Regional History from Ancient Times to the End of the 18th century'' (Asmara, Eritrea: The Red Sea, Inc., 1997) sultanate located in eastern Ethiopia in what is now eastern Shewa) and Adal and Mora (Gadabursi Clan, Somali, and Harari vassal sultanate of Ifat by 1288, centered around Dakkar and later Harar, with Zeila as its main port and second city, in eastern Ethiopia and in Somaliland's Awdal region; Mora was located in what is now the southern Afar Region of Ethiopia and was subservient to Adal). Ottoman Somaliland In 1548 CE, the port city of Zeila was annexed by the Ottoman Empire. The reason for this was that Zeila is situated in a stragetic location on the Red Sea because it is near the Bab el Mandeb strait; a key area for trade with the East. For 300 years, Zeila enjoyed trade with other countries and was home to Arab, Persian (Persian people) and even Indian merchants. On 1884, when the empire was on the brink of collapse; Egypt, an Ottoman vassal at that time, occupied western parts of Somaliland, the other regions being controlled by Somali clans. Then, During the Scramble for Africa era, the region now claimed by Somaliland was the British Somaliland Protectorate. Biography While little is known of his life, according to Franz Steiner, al-Jabarti was born in the village of Tell el Gabarti in the northern Delta province of Beheira, al-Jabarti, 'Abd al-Rahman. History of Egypt: 'Aja'ib al-Athar fi 'l-Tarajim wa'l-Akhbar. vol.1. Franz Steiner Verlag Stuttgart. 1994. while Abdulkader Saleh states that al-Jabarti was born in Cairo. Abdulkader Saleh, "Ǧäbärti," in von Uhlig, Siegbert, ed., ''Encyclopaedia Aethiopica: D-Ha''. Wiesbaden:Harrassowitz Verlag, 2005, p.597. According to al-Jabarti's writings, his name comes from his "seventh-degree grandfather," Abd al-Rahman, who was the earliest member of his family known to him. David Ayalon, "The Historian al-Jabartī and His Background," ''Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London'', 1960, p.238 The older Abd al-Rahman was from the al-Jabart region in Zeila, modern Somalia A history of Arabic literature‎ pg 423 by Clément Huart and visited the ''Riwaqs'' of the Jabarti communities in Mecca and Medina before making it to Egypt where he became Sheikh of the ''Riwaq'' there and head of the Jabarti community. - Salal (Salal, Somalia) Zeila Awdal - It took until 1897 before the necessary permission from French authorities was received, by which time significant opposition in Ethiopia had materialised. Elements of the traditional nobility were opposed to the construction, and there were popular demonstrations against it. There was also opposition from the British (United Kingdom) legation in Addis Ababa, which feared a reduction in traffic to the port of Zeila in British Somaliland. The 9th-century Islamic writers Al-Masudi and Yaqub Ibn Abudllah Al-Hamawi wrote in their book ''Aqeeliyoon'' (which describes the lives and lineages of the descendants of the prophet Mohammed's young cousin, Aqeel Ibn Abu Talib) that several Quraysh (Quraysh (tribe)) sub-clans moved to the city of Zeila in present day Somalia, around the ninth century A.D. Wikipedia:Zeila Commons:Category:Zeila


Tuva

wikipedia:Tuva commons:Category:Tuva


Harar

parts of Eritrea and Djibouti, the region began to assume a political character independent of Ethiopia. Three Islamic sultanates were founded in and around the area named Shewa (a Semitic-speaking sultanate in eastern Ethiopia, modern Shewa province and ruled by the Mahzumi dynasty, related to Muslim Amhara (Amhara people)s and Argobbas), Ifat (Kingdom of Ifat) (another Semitic-speaking Pankhurst, Richard. ''The Ethiopian Borderlands: Essays in Regional History from


Brandenburg

WikiPedia:Brandenburg Dmoz:Regional Europe Germany States Brandenburg Commons:Category:Brandenburg


Mongolia

Qing rule (Mongolia during Qing rule) and was renamed into ''Öbür Monggol'' in 1947, ''öbür'' meaning the southern side of a mountain, while the Chinese term ''nei menggu'' was retained. Some Mongolians use the name "Southern Mongolia" in English (English language) as well. Huhbator Borjigin. 2004. The history and political character of the name of 'Nei Menggu' (Inner Mongolia). Inner Asia 6: 61-80. * "Outer Mongolia": This region corresponds to the modern state of Mongolia, plus the Russian-administered region of Tannu Uriankhai, and a part of northern Xinjiang. It includes the four leagues (''aimag'') of the Khalkha Mongols north of Gobi (Gobi desert), as well as the Tannu Uriankhai and Khovd (Khovd Province) regions in northwestern Mongolia, which were overseen by the General of Uliastai at the city of Uliastai. * "Inner Mongolia": This region corresponds to most of modern Inner Mongolia and some neighbouring areas in Liaoning and Jilin provinces. The banners (banner (Inner Mongolia)) and tribes in this region came under six leagues (league (Inner Mongolia)) (''chuulghan''): Jirim , Juuuda, Josutu, Xilingol, Ulanqab, and Yekejuu. * Miyake, Marc (Marc Hideo Miyake) (United States, 1971–), historical linguistics, Old Japanese, Tangut language * Mönkh-Amgalan, Yümjiriin (Yümjiriin Mönkh-Amgalan) (Mongolia), pragmatics, semantics, syntax, Mongolian language, dialectology * Mori Hiromichi (Hiromichi Mori) (Japan, 1949–), Japanese language '''Inuit throat singing''' or '''katajjaq''', also known as (and commonly confused with) the generic term overtone singing Commons:Category:Mongolia WikiPedia:Mongolia Dmoz:Regional Asia Mongolia


East Germany

such as ''Schwarz auf Weiss'' (Black on White, 1996) or ''Die Wiederholung'' (The Repetition, 1997). His interest in Heiner Müller can partly be explained by the political character of Müller's texts, as may be the case with his interest in Bertolt Brecht and Hanns Eisler, works by the latter he used in composing his staged concert


Cairo

; - valign "top" During the 1960s, the Eritrean independence struggle was led by the Eritrean Liberation Front (ELF). In 1960 Eritrean exiles in Cairo founded the Eritrean Liberation Front. In contrast to the ELM, from the outset the ELF was bent on waging armed struggle on behalf of Eritrean independence. The ELF was composed mainly of Eritrean Muslims from the rural lowlands on the western edge of the territory. In 1961 the ELF's political character was vague, but radical Arab


Liverpool

liberal policy of the channel in that period. The soap was also heavily politicised. Bobby Grant (Ricky Tomlinson), a militant trade-unionist anti-hero, was the most overtly political character. Storylines were often more sensationalist than on other soaps (in the soaps history there were two armed sieges on the street) and were staged more graphically with violence (particularly, rape) being often used. Until the late nineteenth century sugar was purchased in sugarloaf loaves


Syria

, the Eritrean independence struggle was led by the Eritrean Liberation Front (ELF). In 1960 Eritrean exiles in Cairo founded the Eritrean Liberation Front. In contrast to the ELM, from the outset the ELF was bent on waging armed struggle on behalf of Eritrean independence. The ELF was composed mainly of Eritrean Muslims from the rural lowlands on the western edge of the territory. In 1961 the ELF's political character was vague, but radical Arab states such as Syria and Iraq sympathized


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017